ALAMEDA MINE (Alameda & Jolly Girl)

Survey number:      Owner:      Date of discovery:
"Rich Ore Struck In Digging an Outhouse."

Alameda-Jolly Girl Site, (looking SW), 2011. Foundations mark the location of the hoisting equipment and probably a compressor, the collar of a shaft and waste dump behind. Joburg is visible in the distance, as well as the Yellow Aster Mine. - William J. Warren © 2011

April 1, 1897:“THOMAS BULL, president of the Ashford Mining Company, has bonded to William McEwan for the sum of $3500 the Alameda and Jolly Girl claims, adjoining the townsite of Johannesburg and extensions of the Val Verde.  The bond runs one year, but McEwen agrees to go to work at once and do a certain amount of work each month and give a royalty on all ore milled.  These mines have not been extensively worked, yet they have been pretty thoroughly prospected their entire length and a shaft has been sunk one to a depth of 20 feet.  The vein of ore is large running from six to seven feet and assays from $16 to $20 per ton.  Some money was paid down when the bond was made.

The building for the dry concentrator (See Wood’s Mill) now being built on the Alameda mine is nearly completed, and the machinery is all on the ground.  It is expected that it will ready for operation in about two days.” -  The Los Angeles Daily Times

April 28, 1897:“BETWEEN THESE MINES (Gotham, Algonquin, Eclipse, and W. J. Bryan) and Johannesburg and almost in the town limits lie the Jolly Girl and Alameda which William McClure and others bonded recently from the Ashford boys and Bull.  These mines are both being worked  and both prospect well. Two shafts have been started on the Alameda, the ore showing a vein on the surface of two feet or more, the other at a depth of fifteen feet of six feet.  From the latter some of the coarsest gold yet found in the district has been horned out , some of the particles being nearly as large as a grain of wheat.  Some of the gold from the largest ledge prospects as high as $70 while a careful average taken from the entire width of the ledge show $16.” -  The Los Angeles Daily Times

May 12, 1897:“THE RICHEST STRIKE YET made in this district is now absorbing everybody’s attention and a continuous line of people passing to and from the since yesterday (Friday morning).  The strike is in the Alameda mine just beyond Johannesburg, and east of the Val Verde and is marvelously rich in coarse gold many single hornings yielding from 50 cents to $1.  Some one is continually manipulating the hornspoon, while many spectators crowd around and watch the result.  The gold is very coarse, single specimens being equal in size to small grains of wheat.  This is remarkable for quartz gold, as it is usually very fine, sometimes requiring many hundreds of small colors to make the same bulk.  The ledge matter is a dark-looking mass of decomposed quartz, granite, schist, and slate, resembling anything rather that rich gold-bearing mineral, but when pounded and washed out showing the richest prospect, old miners say, of anything ever found in this fabulously rich district.

The find is on the Alameda, one of the two mines recently bonded from the Ashford  boys, and Bull, by William McEwen and others for $3500.  At the time the bond was given there was a shaft on the claim twenty feet in depth, showing a well-defined ledge some three feet in thickness, prospecting $25 per ton or more.  This was all that was visible, except that it was in a good locality and could be traced for some distance on the surface.  McEwen sold a one-fourth interest in the bond to W. B. McConnel and another fourth to H. F. Parker, an eighth to G. W. McPherson and an eighth to William Sim, retaining one-fourth himself in this and the Jolly Girl Mine, the two covered by the bond.

In digging for an outhouse shortly afterward, the ledge was struck in a new place a short distance east of the shaft mentioned, and the proved to be much richer ore.  A new shaft was sunk on this spot, which is now down twenty odd feet, showing a ledge at least three feet wide, prospecting $50 of more to the ton.  Ten tons from this shaft were recently sent to Koehn’s Springs Mill, but no return has yet been made of it.

These men are all workers, an, have no surplus capital, have been doing their own development work, and in order to get their mines developed have offered to give 80 per cent, of the proceeds of all ore taken out to any parties who would sink a shaft 4×6 feet 100 feet in depth.  Young Arthur Finch accepted this proposal and began prospecting nearly on top of the low hill west of the former workings and distant from the first shaft 200 feet or more,and it was there he was fortunate enough to make the rich find.  In one day’s time he took out forty-three sacks of this rich ore and sent it off this morning to the Sampling Works close by.

It was estimated that the visitors carried away $50 worth of gold in the specimens which each one begged for Friday, never seeming to realize that they were asking for dollars and half-dollars in the value of the specimens they craved.

The coarseness of the gold is the most surprising thing to old miners.  The hole is only down three or four feet, but young Finch could make a nice thing and save himself much hard labor in sinking the 100 foot shaft, by selling out and letting some one else do the work, yet he may make much more by holding onto his contract.

A number of persons will go to work with dry washers on the surface tomorrow, each agreeing to pay McEven and his partners 50 per cent of all money taken out over and above wages.

A few days ago H. J. Woollacott, I. L. Lowman, Polaski Bros., and one or two other parties of Los Angeles wanted to re-bond the above properties for $10,000, but the agreement failed on account of McEven and his partners insisting on the payment to them of the cash advanced by them at the time of making the bond.

The Jolly Girl Mine lies just alongside the Alameda, and looks good.  Should further development by sinking a shaft of tunnel bring forth anything she may indeed prove a very “Jolly Girl” to hold.” -The Los Angeles Daily Times

April 14, 1897:“THE EXCITEMENT still keeps up over the new strike on the Alameda .  People were passing to and from the mine all day yesterday and today.  George W. Fugard and a man named Place have taken a contract to sink another shaft a little distance from the strike on the same terms as Finch and began work today.” -  The Los Angeles Daily Times

2011: Mill, Cyanide Pond Foundations & Tailings

May 16, 1897: “THE NEW STRIKE on the Alameda still absorbs much attention, and people have not yet lost interest in it.  So far as known it continues rich as ever.  A few days ago a party of Ladies visited the mine.  With the party was beautiful little girl about 6 years of age, the daughter of Mrs. Frame of San Diego.  Mr. Finch, the lucky finder of the lead, saw the little girl and immediately went to work and took out enough gold in a very few minutes for a ring.  This ore he presented to the child, as she was the first child to visit the mine.  Two assays from the mine yielded respectively $238 and $1503 .  The lower ore was made from a mixture of soil and ore without selection, the other from more solid rock.  Specimens could be selected which would run much higher in value.’ – The Los Angeles Daily Times

May 26, 1897: “THE ALAMEDA still holds out good as ever, some extraordinary rich ore having been found in the shaft some distance east of the late find.” -  The Los Angeles Daily Times

May 26, 1897: “Experts are in route from Boston and will arrive this week to examine the Alameda mine in the interest of an eastern syndicate, and it is probable that a deal will be made. It is said the price to be paid is well up in the five figures. “Lucky” Baldwin, when here, tried to bond the mine, but failed.” – The  Herald

May 29, 1897:“A SOLID PIECE OF QUARTZ was taken from the shaft in the Alameda mine a few days ago at a depth of thirty feet, which contains more than two cubic feet of ore worth, from prospects broken from the edge, something like $100 per ton.  The shaft is about two hundred feet east of where the shaft is being sunk by the young man Finch, where fabulously rich rock is being found. The ledge in the shaft above referred to is three feet in width and getting richer with each shot.  Several parties have been trying to buy the property, but so far without success.  Oliver P. Posey, of Denver, owner of the Tom Boy mine, and formerly of the Yankee Girl, two famous Colorado properties, visited the Alameda yesterday, but it is not known that he made an offer, although very favorably impressed.

J. W. Ragsdale, has bought a one-sixteenth interest in the Alameda mine, consideration not being made public.” - The Los Angeles Daily Times

June 12, 1897:  “THE ALAMEDA The is still maintaining its high standard, drifts being run in each direction at the fifty foot level.  Another piece of rock almost as large as the one taken out before, and which was  mentioned in the Times, was taken out Monday morning, free gold being visible in many places, and the piece not weighing less than 125 pounds.  An assay from the first and larger piece showed $208 per ton.” -  The Los Angeles Daily Times

June 27, 1897: “THE ALAMEDA, beyond Johannesburg, is down sixty feet, with a drift to the east of twenty-seven  feet in a solid vein four feet of high-grade ore. This company is not milling anything and has almost a hundred tons piled up on the dump.’

Young Arthur Finch, who made the first rich strike on the Alameda, has a shaft down twenty feet now has a small vein of rock equally as rich at at the surface.  The chances are that he will yet make a good stake in sinking the 100 feet called for by his contract with the owners. “  - The Los Angeles Daily Times

July 11, 1897:“ABOUT ONE-HALF MILE SOUTH of the Val Verde Group, and about the same distance east of Johannesburg, is the Alameda, which, together with Jolly Girl mine, was located in July 1896, by the Ashford brothers, who now own the King Solomon mines, lying to the west of Johannesburg.  The Alameda  lies 1500 feet northwesterly and southeasterly, and the Jolly Girl adjoins it to the north at right angles.  The two mines form a T and give a total length of line of 2100 feet.  The properties are in the charge of Superintendent William H. McEwen who has given me some facts in relation to them.  The Ashford boys, who located the claims put down a shaft on each of them.  The ore through which they went showed up low-grade, but to offset that there was any quantity of it.  It was that fact that induced Mr. McEwen to bond and take a lease of the two properties, which he did on March 30 last.  The bond is for $3500, running for one year, he having the privilege of prospecting and taking out ore, paying the Ashfords a percentage of all taken out.  Since then Mr. McEwen has sold his interest in the bond and lease to other parties, who are now working it.

Work was began on the Alameda last April, and it was soon discovered that there were parallel leads on the claim.  In leveling the ground for a vault, a good prospect was discovered, and a shaft waa at once begun, which is now down seventy-five feet in a good body of ore, with smooth walls on either side.  The foot wall is slate, while the hanging wall is schist.  The vein, which near the surface was only about twelve inches wide has widened out as it went down, until at a depth of seventy-five feet, it is over five feet wide, with the vein slanting up as it gets deeper.  A mill test of the surface ore on this vein was made when first discovered, and it showed $25 to the ton.  A few days ago another mill test was made of the ore taken ou at seventy feet, and it was found to run about $60 to the ton.  Work is being pushed on all three of the parallel veins, all of which show free gold in the rock. They are about twenty feet apart, and the belief is expressed that it will be found they unite in one strong vein when a lower level is reached. Superintendent McEwen further tells me that a ten-stamp mill will be erected on the Alameda as soon as they get lower in the shaft they are lower in the shaft they are now sinking, or within the next sixty days.” - The Los Angeles Daily Times

July 31, 1897: “J. R. Parker, formerly of Riverside County, last week leased ground on the King Solomon claim. He is now down about twenty feet on a ledge about twelve inches wide. Tests of ore from different parts of the ledge average about $25 per ton, though some parts of the ledge, where the ore apparently lies in bunches, runs as high as $100 to the ton. The owners of the King Solomon own quite a number of claims in this vicinity and have been particularly unfortunate in selecting good ones. The Alameda was bonded by them to the present owners and the Plnmore, situated about half a mile northeast of Johannesburg, gives every indication of being a rich claim.” – The Herald

August 25, 1897: “The Alameda Company is pushing work on their mine and have forces of men at work in four shafts, the deepest of which is down nearly 100 feet. They will increase their working force this coming week and begin drifting in twoof the shafts. ” – The Herald

September 11, 1897; “ONE OF THE LEADING PROPERTIES of this camp and one which has marked attention, by reason of discoveries of ore of phenomenal richness, is the Alameda mine. It adjoins on the east the town site of Johannesburg, already one of the most active sections of the Rand district and which it is confidently expected will be the metropolis of it when the railway from Kramer, now being constructed, is completed.

It is upon the property of the Alameda mine that the big reductions works are now being erected, at a cost exceeding, $20,000., and which, it is believed, will work a revolution in gold mining throughout the country.

This plant is known as the Woods Automatic Dry Concentrator, and for the past month a large force of men have been engaged in its erection. The starting up of this plant will, it is expected, take place about the middle of this month, and its first run of gold will be witnessed by prominent men from different part of the country, who are anxious to see how it works, when operated on a large scale. While the plant has been erected for reducing the ores of the Alameda mine, it is the intention of the owners, to make test runs of other ores when desired. The capacity of the plant is thirty tons per twenty-four hours. The Alameda company is at present working a large force of men day and night in developing the property, preparatory to taking out ore in large quantities. The Alameda and the Jolly Girl are the two mines owned by this company. They were located in 1896 by the Ashford brothers, the present owners of the well known King Solomon mine. The two claims were purchased by them on March 30, last, by William H. McEwan, one of the pioneer miners of the Rand district. Since then Mr. McEwan has sold his interests in both properties to J. W. Ragsdale of Fresno, William Sim, and K. Hamilton Sim of Tulare, and George W. McPherson of San Francisco, and who are now the owners of a property which has a bright a future as any in the camp.

Work was commenced on the Alameda on April 10 last, when it was soon demonstrated that there were at least four parallel leads on it. Four shafts are being sunk at the present time, the deepest of which is over one hundred feet down, and all of them in good bodies of ore.

These parallel veins are from twenty to forty feet apart, and will, it is believed, unite in one strong vein of great size when a greater depth has been reached. The leads run the entire length of the two claims. The ore bodies are from three to six feet in width, and the ore is free milling.

Since development work was commenced upward of one hundred tons of ore have been milled, the net returns from which ranged from $9 to $100 per ton. It was upon the Alameda that the record breaking strike was made, when on man alone took out $312 in one day. He took the ore to the Johannesburg Sampling Works and got that money for it. A large proportion of the Alameda ore shows the gold in the quartz, and samples carrying away up into the thousands are easily obtainable. The gold is mostly course, and very pure, having a value of $18 per ounce.

In addition to the smaller rich veins, there are other large leads of ore running from $8 to $15 per ton, and it is upon these large bodies that the management rely for permanency, although there is in the richer, smaller veins, nothing to indicate that they are not of a permanent character, only their phenomenal richness, which is really not an impeachment of their lasting qualities.

The owners of this property are making arrangement for working this mine on a large scale. Hoisting works are being erected, tramways built, etc. for the purpose of handling large quantities of ore with dispatch and economy. The property has recently been incorporated under the laws of California, with a capital of $500,000. No stock is being offered for sale, nor are individual members of the company offering any or their holdings.” - The Los Angeles Daily Times

September 27, 1897: ”The Alameda has made another rich strike In shaft No. 3, where they, found two feet of $250 ore at a depth of seventy five feet.” – The Herald

October 16, 1897: “The Alameda grows better daily as work progresses. No. 5 shaft is down 100 feet and is just as rich as ever. In No. 4 there is a five foot vein of rock that mills $30 per ton, and runs very evenly. Last Monday a drift was started to connect shafts 4 and 5. The concentrator has been in operation part of the time this week doing good work. It is expected that all will be in readiness soon to start in on a steady run.” – The Herald

The Drawing Provided With the Adjoining Article on the Alameda Mine Gives a Good Visual Perspective of the Extent of Development on The Alameda/Jolly Girl Mines. In Comparison With the Drawing of the Val Verde This Mine Appears to Be A Much Better Investment. This View is Looking Easterly from Johannesburg. The Woods Dry Concentrator is On the Left, With the Alameda and Jolly Girl Mines on the Right.

October 31, 1897: “THE ALAMEDA MINES — This valuable property, comprising the Alameda and the Jolly Girl, adjoins the townsite of Johannesburg on the east. It is upon this property that the big Wood automatic dry concentrator plant and ore crusher is situated, and which it is confidently believed will work a revolution in gold mining throughout the country. It is reported that the Alameda Company contemplates purchasing the above plant when fully convinced of its adaptability to their needs. The above two claims were located in 1896 by the Ashford brothers, present owners of the King Solomon group. The present company was incorporated Sept. 1, 1897, with a capital stock of $500,000, divided into 500,000 shares of $1 each, all of which was taken up by the partners. The officers of the company are as follows: J. W. Ragsdale, president; K. Hamilton Sim, vice-president; William Sim, treasurer; George W. McPherson, secretary, and William H. McEwen, superintendent. The principal work now being done is on shaft No. 3, which runs on an incline to a depth of 130 feet, where the ledge straightens up thence 15 feet, on an angle of 45 degrees. The ledge is 34 feet wide at the 145-foot depth, has well denned walls of porphyry and syenite, and good talc gouge. The ore mills on an average $20 to the ton. From the 80 foot level there is a drift of 25 feet in length (running easterly toward shaft No. 1), which has similar walls and an 18-inch ledge of high grade ore, milling $75. The bulk of the ore taken out of this shaft and drift is stock plied (about 180 tons) on the dump awaiting completion of the above mentioned Wood concentrator. Ten tons of ore from this shaft was just being shipped to Cuddeback lake mill, when the writer went through the mines, and about the same quantity will be shipped each week until the dry concentrator and crusher are in operation. Shaft No. 1, where a rich strike was made some months ago, is down 100 feet by incline shaft at an angle of 45 degrees. This shaft is now being worked, although in a large body of medium quality ore the company deeming it best to push development in shafts Nos. 2 and 3. Shaft No. 2 is about 60 feet west of shaft No. 3, is down 90 feet, and is in good ore, similar to that of shaft No. 3, above described. The Jolly Girl, adjoining the Alameda mine on the north, has a 50-foot shaft just completed and promises, from present indications, to become as good a property as the Alameda. The company contemplates adding a gasoline hoist engine to their plant in a short time, and to reduce the ores from the various shafts and drifts in the Wood concentrator and crusher. These two claims are unquestionably destined to become great gold producers.” – The Herald

November 23, 1897: “Some very rich ore was taken out of the Alameda mine this week. It is said this company will purchase the dry concentrator plant recently erected here and use it for the reduction of the Alameda ore alone. ”San Francisco Call

May 09, 1898: “K. Hamilton Sim of Hanford and J. W. Ragsdale of Madera were in camp this week looking after the interests of the Alameda mine, in which they are both, heavily interested.”– The Herald

September 18, 1898:  “The meeting of the stockholders of the Alameda mine, advertised to be held In Randsburg on the 7th inst., has been postponed until the first of this month. — The Herald

October 03, 1898:  “The Alameda Company elected officers Wednesday to serve for the ensuing year, and they are now arranging matters to commence work on their property.” – The Herald

October 31, 1897: “THE ALAMEDA MINES — This valuable property, comprising the Alameda and the Jolly Girl, adjoins the townsite of Johannesburg on the east. It is upon this property that the big Wood automatic dry concentrator plant and ore crusher is situated, and which it is confidently believed will work a revolution in gold mining throughout the country. It is reported that the Alameda Company contemplates purchasing the above plant when fully convinced of its adaptability to their needs. The above two claims were located in 1896 by the Ashford brothers, present owners of the King Solomon group. The present company was incorporated Sept. 1, 1897, with a capital stock of $500,000, divided into 500,000 shares of $1 each, all of which was taken up by the partners. The officers of the company are as follows: J. W. Ragsdale, president; K. Hamilton Sim, vice-president; William Sim, treasurer; George W. McPherson, secretary, and William H. McEwen, superintendent. The principal work now being done is on shaft No. 3, which runs on an incline to a depth of 130 feet, where the ledge straightens up thence 15 feet, on an angle of 45 degrees. The ledge is 34 feet wide at the 145-foot depth, has well denned walls of porphyry and syenite, and good talc gouge. The ore mills on an average $20 to the ton. From the 80 foot level there is a drift of 25 feet in length (running easterly toward shaft No. 1), which has similar walls and an 18-inch ledge of high grade ore, milling $75. The bulk of the ore taken out of this shaft and drift is stock plied (about 180 tons) on the dump awaiting completion of the above mentioned Wood concentrator. Ten tons of ore from this shaft was just being shipped to Cuddeback lake mill, when the writer went through the mines, and about the same quantity will be shipped each week until the dry concentrator and crusher are in operation. Shaft No. 1, where a rich strike was made some months ago, is down 100 feet by incline shaft at an angle of 45 degrees. This shaft is now being worked, although in a large body of medium quality ore the company deeming it best to push development in shafts Nos. 2 and 3. Shaft No. 2 is about 60 feet west of shaft No. 3, is down 90 feet, and is in good ore, similar to that of shaft No. 3, above described. The Jolly Girl, adjoining the Alameda mine on the north, has a 50-foot shaft just completed and promises, from present indications, to become as good a property as the Alameda. The company contemplates adding a gasoline hoist engine to their plant in a short time, and to reduce the ores from the various shafts and drifts in the Wood concentrator and crusher. These two claims are unquestionably destined to become great gold producers.” – The Herald

November 22, 1897: “The main shaft of the Alameda mine is now down nearly 200 feet, and the company is now taking out good ore. This is one of the most promising mining properties in the Rand district, and, although incorporated, is a close corporation as the stock is owned entirely by five persons. The writer learned this week that in order to purchase general machinery, and especially to purchase the Wood’s Automatic Dry Concentrator and Crusher, now, on their ground, when the crusher is working satisfactorily—the company contemplate offering 60,000 shares of stock at 10 cents per share. The secretary of the company, George W. McPherson, leaves tomorrow for San Francisco, where he will doubt less place the stock among his friends if the company desires him to do so.”  – The Herald

November 23, 1897: “Some very rich ore was taken out ot the Alameda mine this week. It Is said this company will purchase the dry concentrator plant recently erected here and use it for the reduction of the Alameda ore alone. ” – San Francisco Call

May 09, 1898: “K. Hamilton Sim of Hanford and J. W. Ragsdale of Madera were in camp this week looking after the interests of the Alameda mine, in which they are both, heavily interested.”– The Herald

September 18, 1898: “The meeting of the stockholders of the Alameda mine, advertised to be held In Randsburg on the 7th inst., has been postponed until the first of this month. — The Herald

October 03, 1898: “The Alameda Company elected officers Wednesday to serve for the ensuing year, and they are now arranging matters to commence work on their property.” – The Herald

July 31, 1925: “RICH, VIRGIN GOLD STRIKE MADE IN ALAMEDA MINE—Gold!  Virgin gold, clean and bright as it came from the granulated quartz fifty feet below the surface of the Norman and Holohan lease on the Alameda claim, one-half mile east of the King Solomon mine and across the county road of Johannesburg, can be seen in every panning, whether from the high grade streak of better than two feet, or from the remainder of the five feet of exposed vein matter.  As the prospecting shaft is only five feet in width at its best, with only the foot wall exposed from below the 40-foot depth where the rich dirt was struck.

At this time it may be well to state than it is strictly a lease granted to Charles Norman and D. J. Holohan, and in no way is an apple sauce story to boost the property of probable sale of the Alameda.

For many weeks, yes, over a long, long month has this story been kept under cover, even now The Times is not at liberty to state what the values of the rich streak or even of what the ore in sight will break at.  As, the mine is close in and of easy access, it is worth a long trip to have a sight of the prospectors’ method of testing gold rock by panning.

The story as far as we are at liberty to unfold:  Some four years ago, Charlie Norman was one of the owners of the Alameda, a one-time sensational gold producer of the Rand District gold mines.  While as an owner, he prospected much of the surface, but at no time could he much to go on until he found a little showing north and south.  Further work gave him in an opposite direction, east and west, what looked like a fracture.  Circumstances coming out that caused Norman to lose his interest, not more was done in the prospecting.

Many months ago Norman and Holohan started in quietly to secure a lease of the Alameda, and one year was good enough with them and they did not ask any further time.  The lease was granted and a prospect shaft was started.  For forty feet nothing but the country rock and formation was found.  Norman was tuned up that there must be ore.  “Dinny,” having nothing to measure going thru that kind of much, but did have a lot of faith and confidence in his “pard, so it was a case of pulling their belts tighter.  Not a prospector’s sign to gladden their hearts that they were anywhere near it, when, lo and behold! They were smack into a good vein, a hidden vein, the sort that the wise guy will be heard telling of, as found by a couple of lucky ginks.  In the true miner sense it will be the result of what digging can and will bring this gold district to.

To any practical mining man, prospector, leaser, chloride or man about camp the sight of the five feet of vein matter lying snugly to the foot wall, and this wall so well defined and its natural smooth, shiny, face is something seldom seen in these days of prospectors who  follow the game from  the roadside.

All in all such finds there is little use in trying to keep it from the festive locator, little by little they caught on, which meant that after hours the dump would find one of more sampling and panning the dump; when it got to the visits climbing the ladder that was too much for the hard working pair of leasers, they were then forced to place a special watchman thereon besides a heavy padlocked door over the shaft.

Only the other Sunday, a former owner of the Alameda and his wife drove up from Los Angeles to “congratulate” Mr. Holohan on their good luck, on getting out of their car and walking toward the boundary lines of the Alameda claims, the cry of “Halt!” went out with the warning not to come any nearer, which was heeded all right; the lady stopping and the man replying, spoke to Mr. Holohan, “I want to speak to you,” no attention was paid to the man and a second warning given in a broader sense was promptly considered and heeded.

Months ago when the lease was being sought, a few hundred dollars would have secured a tidy interest in the lease, but today the same portion of their interest will go into five figures.  Los Angeles people have now asked for a refusal to come and look at it with a proposition of cutting in.  In the mean time to raise money for grub and powder they are installing a one-ton sampling mill and if the  milling comes anywhere near their estimate of the pannings they then and there will install a five stamp mill they own but have not set up.

In the success of this find, in positively pure rock and muck, it means that Randsburg and the gold zone of the Rand district, will bring hundreds of leasing miners that will put their time and money in securing available ground, that cam be leased and will be just as confident as was Charles Norman in his venture, that is, they will dig and dig some more.  As in the great game of baseball, “it takes one to hit it” and the one is here.” – Randsburg Times

1925—TWO STAMP MILL FOR ALAMEDA MINE TO HANDLE THE RICH ROCK OF THE LEASE – In the securing of a good two-stamp mill by Norman and Holohan, leasers of the Alameda, the little one stamp mill will have to be dismantled, and the foundation for the larger one is now being set.  It is their intention and desire that several tons of the highest grade shall be at first handled, for the purpose of bringing quick money into the treasury to enable them to finance further mining operations and the extracting of ore from the five foot showing now opened below the find, forty feet below the surface.

After the clear milling that must follow, Norman and Holohan, will then erect a five-stamp mill on the ground and go at the work on a larger scale.

Among the large crowd of weekend and Sunday visitors to the new find, were a number of the officials and principals of the various operating companies of the Rand district.  As the leasers of the Alameda had no objections, everyone had the liberty of making their own pannings.

With rock that any miner could grind and pan out better than the going wastes of the day, there was not likely to be very many “skinks”.”—Randsburg Times

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