KING SOLOMON, (Eagle’s Nest, Fairy Prince, Fairy Queen, Hector, King Solomon, Magpie, Miranda, Rocket, Wasp), aka NORTH RAND SILVER MINING CO., SAN FRANCISCO GOLD, and SHIPSEY MINING & MILLING CO.

Survey number:      Owner:      Date of discovery: 1896?

Headframe, Hoist Shed, Seven Miners, 1897 - Deric English Collection

September 15, 1896: “ASHFORD MINES (QUARTZ) —This group is 1 ½ miles E. of Randsburg at 3,800’ elevation, and comprise the Eagle’s Nest, Fairy Prince, Fairy Queen, Hector, King Solomon, Magpie, Miranda, Pinmore, Rocket and Wasp. The veins are small, 6” to 12” wide, and have a general course of S. E. and N. W. Only surface work is done on any of them. Ashford Bros. of Randsburg, owners.” - California State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of the State Mineralogist for the two years ending September 15, 1896

October 31, 1896: “RAMEY, STEPHENSON and company are working the King Solomon, an extension of the Butte, which is clearing them $130 to the ton. Ashford Bros. have struck the same lead, which they think will go at least $100.” – The Bakersfield Californian

December 17, 1896: “A BIG INCORPORATION—THE ASHFORD MINING COMPANY FORMED WITH A CAPITAL OF $200,000.—The Ashford Mining Company has recently been formed with a capital of $200,000. The directors are: Thomas Bull of Santa Clara, W. C. Andrews of San Jose, H. J. Ashford of Randsburg, L. R. Ashford of Randsburg, Harold Ashford of Randsburg. The following mines in the Randsburg Camp have been purchased: The King Solomon, Hector, Desert Queen, Kootena, and Magpie. Some 600 feet of shaft and drift work has been done on these claims. The King Solomon at a depth of 150 feet shows a two-foot ledge of rich ore with well-defined walls. The ledge has been opened on half a dozen places, and can be clearly traced the full length of the claim. In drifting on this ledge thorough six feet of ore a two foot vein was found in the foot wall that will average from $600 to $1000 per ton. The last clean-up of mixed ore runs $100 per ton. The extension of both the Butte and Kenyon leads have been opened on this property, these being two of the best paying claims in the district. The Kenyon has milled ore averaging $700 to the tone, while the Butte, which employs about thirty men, is having a steady output of ore running from $50 to $150 per ton .In addition to these defined leads, the company’s property is covered with an immense number of very good rich stringers that are expected to pay good dividends from the surface.” – San Francisco Cal

December 21, 1896: “KING SOLOMON’S MINE – SAN JOSEANS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN GOLD DIGGINGS – FIVE QUARTZ LEDGES FROM WHICH FINE ORE HAS BEEN SECURED AND MORE IN SIGHT—A company of San Joseans is interested in some mining property near the Randsburg diggings in Kern County that have recently attracted so much attention. The operations are under the Ashford Mining Company, named from three brothers who left San Jose on a prospection trip about a year ago with nothing but a “grub-stake.” They discovered the ledges of gold-bearing ore, and the company to develop them has since been organized in Kern County with the following directors: Thomas Bull and W. C. Andrews of San Jose, H. J. Ashford, and L. R. Ashford and Harold Ashford. This company now has control of five mines on as many different quartz ledged, located close together. The Mines have been named as follows: King Solomon, Desert Queen, Hector, Magpie, Kootenai. King Solomon’s mine is much the richest, ore from it being assayed as high as $300 to $1,000 to the ton. Dr. Fred Plank, a mining expert and assayer of this city, during the past week made a test of some ore that was sent from this mine and it assayed $918 to the ton. The ore from these mines does not show much free gold, but this is said to be the best test of a permanent ledge. The location of the mines of the Ashford Company is in one of the most desolate regions imaginable. It is a desert whose only resources before gold was discovered were sagebrush and rattlesnakes. It is at an elevation of 4,000 feet, however, and is not so hot as might be imagined. The air is so pure that miners continue right along with their work when it is 110 in the shade. The chief difficulty and expense is in securing water. There is not a drop to be obtained at Bull’s camp where these mines are located. Water must be hauled for five miles and costs $2 per barrel. The deepest shaft in the King Solomon mine is now down 130 feet, where there is a ledge two feet in wi(d)th of $300 ore. The gold that was secured from quartz in sinking this shaft had paid all the expenses thus far incurred in prospecting and operating the mines.It is believed that the experience gained in prospecting in Kern County will be of value to the San Joseans, as it may lead to rich gold discoveries that undoubtedly exist in Santa Clara County. With the superior advantages that exist in this section a ledge that would assay $50 per ton would be of more value than a $300 ledge in a region where machinery, water, provisions, and other supplies must be hauled for miles over a barren desert.” –San Jose Daily Mercury

December 29, 1896: “East of the Wedge are the Butte mine and the King Solomon, both heavy producers. A considerable amount of development Work has been done on these mines, shafts being down 125 feet, and large quantities of rich ore have been milled.” – The Herald

April 30, 1897: “SOME TIME AGO the Ashford boys and Bull leased the Hector mine of J. F. Kelly, Al Lester and Charles and Frank Adams. The lease permitted them to sink the shaft fifty feet deeper and drift twenty-five feet each way, and if they encountered good ore on either side , gave them the additional privilege of going 100 feet and up raising at the end to the surface for the purpose of creating an air-shaft. A second lease gave them substantially the same privilege at another fifty-foot level deeper. The young men have pushed the work vigor sly, and while the ore vein is not very thick, it is very good, and the prospects are that will do very well, both in developing the property for the owners and in pay for the work done. A few days ago they had four and one-half tons milled at Smith’s mill at Garlock and this morning got a return of forty ounces of bullion worth at least $16 per ounce, or $640 for the four and one-half tons. This mine is located on the divide between Randsburg and Johannesburg.” – The Los Angeles Daily Times

May 1897: “LISTED IN THE OVERLAND as one of the producing mines of the Rand District in March of 1897. It was discovered April 6, 1896 and had produced $8,000 out of a shaft 138 feet deep. The owners were listed as the Ashford Bros., and Tom Bull.” – Overland Magazine

July 11, 1897: “THIS MINE lies between Randsburg and Johannesburg, but nearer to the latter, it is owned by the Ashford brothers, who located the Alameda and Jolly Girl mines. They also own four other claims: The Hector, Kootenai, Magpie, and the Desert Queen. Last January they incorporated these properties under the name of the Ashford Mining Co. with a capital of $200,000. They have sunk three shafts on the King Solomon ground, the first one being down 250 feet, the second 100 feet and the third forty-five feet. They have also ran a drift 320 feet and made a cross cut of sixty feet. On the Magpie ground they have got one shaft down 40 feet, and have just started another, which is now down about twenty feet. They have also done a considerable amount of work on their other properties. On the King Solomon there is a six horsepower gasoline engine and hoist. They are working ten men at present, and taking out about 100 tons of good rock which has averaged, so far $103 to the ton. The general direction of the veins are northwest and southwest and the dip of the vein is 80 degrees toward the north. The formation is granite porphyry.” - The Los Angeles Daily Times

July 31, 1897: “J. R. PARKER, formerly of Riverside County, last week leased ground on the King Solomon claim. He is now down about twenty feet on a ledge about twelve inches wide. Tests of ore from different parts of the ledge average about $25 per ton, though some parts of the ledge, where the ore apparently lies in bunches, runs as high as $100 to the ton. The owners of the King Solomon own quite a number of claims in this vicinity and have been particularly unfortunate in selecting good ones. The Alameda was bonded by them to the present owners and the Plnmore, situated about half a mile northeast of Johannesburg, gives every indication of being a rich claim.” – The Herald

August 29, 1897: “ON MONDAY A RICH POCKET was struck in the King Solomon mine, the ore running from $1200 to $1100 per ton. The extent of the pocket could not be learned beyond the fact that they had not reached the bottom yet. The English boys have been taking out very good ore from this second shaft, and were particularly pleased at making a rich strike at the depth of 197 feet as it tends to disprove the theory of many that the mines of the desert all pinch out before reaching any great depth. Just over the brow of the hill they have another promising mine, the Hector, from which they are taking very rich rock. At a depth of 60 feet hornings were made which ran as high as $1200 per ton. The ledge is from six to fourteen inches wide and will assay from $100 up. The King Solomon is one of the oldest mines in the district and at one time was down the greatest depth. The “English boys” have worked hard and faithfully and deserve success.” – The Herald

September 17, 1897: “A RICH POCKET HAS BEEN FOUND at a depth of 200 feet in the King Solomon mine at Johannesburg.” – The Herald

September 17, 1897: “ON THURSDAY THE KING SOLOMON sent a large shipment of ore to the mill at Cuddyback Lake.” – The Herald

October 31, 1897: “ANOTHER SHAFT IS NOW BEING SUNK on the King Solomon 270 feet deep, and one on the Magpie 60 feet deep at this writing; another 25 feet deep so far on the Hector. There are also tunnels 127 and 240 feet long on these claims. The ore is hauled up by a gasoline engine hoist, and is milled at Cuddeback Lake mill.” – The Herald

November 23, 1897: “Jno.  Jas.  Miller of Santa Clara is registered at Hotel Johannesburg and is looking into the mining question. ” – San Francisco Call

November 29, 1897: “THOMAS BULL OF THE KING SOLOMON mine spent Thanksgiving in Los Angeles.” – The Herald

December 6, 1897: “THOMAS BULL, GENERAL MANAGER of the Ashford Mining company, leaves for the Panamint country this week. While gone he will make the final arrangements for the purchase of a stamp mill located there. This will be brought to Johannesburg and be used for the milling of the ore from the company’s mines, the most prominent of which at the present time is the Pinmore. A gasoline hoist is being put in place at the Pinmore mine this week. This will greatly increase the output of ore.” – The Herald

King Solomon Tug-Of-War Team, 1897 - Tug of were a popular means of entertainment, and were also held to raise funds for such things as equipment for the Volunteer Fire Department. -- Ruth Bull DeMuth Collection

January 3, 1898: “THE ENGLISH BOYS at the King Solomon mine celebrated Christmas by a dinner which reminded them of old English days. They had the dining room beautifully decorated with pepper and holly and their guests were served with all the good things the land supplies. A minstrel show was given at the hotel Christmas night by local talent and was followed by dancing. Altogether the evening proved to be one of the most enjoyable of the season.” — San Francisco Cal

January 09, 1898: “WORK WILL BE RESUMED at the King Solomon mine on Monday. Work was temporarily stopped at this mine a few weeks ago to enable the entire force to be put to work opening up the Plnmore. Their efforts were so successful that, besides the large quantity of ore milled, there are thousands of tons in sight.” – The Herald

January 28, 1898: “JOHANNESBURG. Jan. 27.—Regular Correspondence. The King Solomon mine, at a depth of 315 feet, is producing free milling ore showing $1000 to the ton. – The Herald

February 06, 1898: “IT IS REPORTED THAT the King Solomon mine at Johannesburg is turning out $1000 ore at a depth of 315 feet.” – San Francisco Call

February 07, 1898: “A VERY GOOD STRIKE of high-grade ore was made last Monday on the King Solomon mine, at the 316-foot level, a large body being uncovered, much of which will go fully $1000 per ton. The ore is free milling and runs quite uniformly high grade.” – The Herald

February 07, 1898: “JOHANNESBURG, Feb. 6.—(Regular Correspondence.) The Ashford Company is making Improvements and developments at the King Solomon mine, which is forcing itself to the front as one of the leaders of the camp. The main shaft is now down about 340 feet and the last forty feet has been pushed through a body of ore from eight to thirty Inches wide that runs nearly $1000 to the ton. The company has recently ordered a 600–foot cable and will sink to that depth in an endeavor to reach water, which many people, familiar with the desert formation, claim will be tapped at that depth. Should the company’s efforts be successful, a stamp mill will at once be erected to handle the ore. ” The Herald

February 20, 1898:  “THE KING SOLOMON is another of Randsburg’s deepest mines which shows improvement as depth is attained. Its main shaft is down 425 feet and the recent strike at the 413 foot level continues rich in free gold. ” –San Francisco Call

March 14, 1898: “CLAIMS AT JOHANNESBURG: “The main shaft of the King Solomon less now the deepest in the district. Although down but 390 feet much of the way is almost perpendicular. .The Wedge shaft is 420 feet, but an Incline.—California Rand” – The Herald

April 06, 1898: “JOHANNESBURG, April 4.—Last week the Johannesburg Reduction works handled ore from the W. J. Bryan and King Solomon mines.” – The Herald

April 16, 1898: “IN A DRIFT near the lower level in the King Solomon mine a very rich body of ore has been encountered. The ledge is between three and four feet wide and has a pay streak running through it which will assay up in the thousands.” - The Bakersfield Californian

May 09, 1898: “AT THE HECTOR MINE a gasoline engine and hoist has been put in place this week and from now on work will be pushed vigorously. The shaft is about 120 feet deep and contains some very rich ore.”– The Herald

October 21, 1899: “THE ASHFORD BOYS ARE DRIFTING both ways from the main shaft on the King Solomon mine.” –Randsburg Miner

October 21, 1899: “THE BUTTE MINE IS DOWN thirty five feet in a new shaft four hundred feet from west end of the claim and in good ore.  They are also drawing all stops at the extreme east end.” –Randsburg Miner

October 21, 1899: “MR. AND MRS. PARKER has returned to Randsburg from a visit out.  Mr. Parker and Harris are now putting in a gasoline hoist on the Hector on a portion of which they hold a lease.” –Randsburg Miner

October 21, 1899: “FRANK ROSE AND COMPANY are still sinking on  the Hector and are now down one-hundred and sixty feet in ore.” –Randsburg Miner

December 29, 1899: “ASHFORD ALLEGES FRAUD. Wants the Sale of the Mining Company’s Property Stopped. SAN JOSE. Pec. i:s.— Action that promises many sensations and at the same time will interest mining men was commenced here to-day by H. J. Ashford, one of the first prospectors who found gold at Randsburg, Kern county, against the Ashford Mining: Company to have a judgment by default for $689.00 and the sale of the company’s property under execution stopped. The suit charges Thomas A Hull, president of the company, and Charles A. bull, his son. who brought the suit, with conspiring to obtain Judgment against the Ashford Mining Company with the ultimate purpose of purchasing the property ol the corporation. Ashford charges that the summons was served on Thomas A. Bull as president, by Attorney C. L. Wittell. after Bull had disposed of his interest in the company, and that he had no right to confess judgment and that the stockholders had no notice of the matter until the property was advertised for sale by notice being posted on the grounds. The affidavit of J. J. Miller shows that Bull bad transferred on February 3, 1897 all his interest in the company to him, and that Bull’s son at that time had no claim against the corporation Ashford claims that be has examined the account of Charles A. Hull and finds it to be only $228 instead of $687.” – San Francisco Call

January 30, 1900: “The King Solomon mines, owned by an incorporated company, are turning out good ore. It lies between Johannesburg and Randsburg, and its main shaft is nearly 500 feet deep.” – Los Angeles Herald

January, 1904: “ASHFORD GROUP — A patented mine reported as consisting of the Desert Queen, King Solomon, Hector, Magpie, and Kootenai. The King Solomon was developed by three shafts from 100 to 350 feet deep and 400 feet of drifts. It had a gasoline hoist, but no mill. J. J. Miller of San Jose was the President. The Kootenai was developed by a 50 foot shaft, with 30 feet of drifts. The Desert Queen was developed by a 50 foot incline shaft. The Hector was reported to have two incline shafts of 135 and 140 feet, a 350 foot tunnel and 100 feet of drifts.” - Aubrey

March 5, 1904: “CHARLES BULL will leave Saturday for his home in San Jose. He will return soon.” – Randsburg Miner

March 19, 1904: “J. J. MILLER, president of the Ashford Mining Company arrived from Santa Clara Tuesday and is attending to matters pertaining to his mining interests.” – Randsburg Miner

March 19. 1904: “HAROLD ASHFORD, a well known Randsburger and a brother of Henry Ashford arrived in town this week. He had made a trip to his old home in England since leaving Randsburg”. – Randsburg Miner

March 26, 1904: “MAGPIE LEASED—W.H. Nelson and Geo. Phillips have leased the Magpie. They began work this week.” – Randsburg Miner

March 26, 1904: “MESSERS. JAMES AND SUMMERS will begin work next week on the King Solomon, they having signed a lease on this property from the Ashford Mining Company.” – Randsburg Miner

April 16, 1904: “JONES AND SUMMERS who are leasing on the King Solomon milled this week at Snow’s mill.” – Randsburg Miner

June ?, 1904: “THE SNOW MILL reports a milling of sixteen tons which gave an average of $26.50. They also report a milling of five tons from the Magpie which made an average of $100 per ton. The Hector being leased by James Montgomery and Ed Shipsey, reports a run of three tons of ore Thursday with a return of $65 per ton.“ - Randsburg Miner

July 23, 1904: “A RUN OF 16 TONS at the Snow Mill, from the King Solomon group, gave and average $16.50 per ton. Five tons from the Magpie averaged over $100 per ton.” – Randsburg Miner

September 12, 1904: “MR. MILLER, of the King Solomon, received an addition to his camp Monday in the shape of Mrs. Miller, who came down from Santa Cruz.” – Randsburg Miner

May 18, 1905: “J. J. MILLER, BALSH & JONES are taking a rest. They have encountered some good ore in the West workings of the King Solomon mine and the chances are they will strike the same rich vein worked so profitably in the Butte mine.” - Randsburg Miner

June 1, 1905: “J. J. MILLER of the Ashford Mining Company left Monday evening for a visit to his family at Santa Clara. Mr. Miller has been suffering recently with a lameness in one of his knees.” – Randsburg Miner

June 8, 1905: “SHOOTING SCRAPE—A quarrel between O. E. Cheesebrough and John Witmore, who were leasers on the Magpie Mine, resulted in a shooting scrape yesterday morning. It appears that the parties had some difficulty and Cheesebrough went to the mine to get his tools. They met there and had some words, both being armed. Cheesebrough went down the ladder into mine to the 100 foot level. Witmore following after and before he reached the bottom Cheesebrough shot, the bullet going through Witmore’s right arm below the elbow, severing an artery and shattering one bone.”

Witmore says he had his pistol but did not have it out of the scabbard. The probability is that he will lose his arm.
Mr. Cheesebrough says he saw him coming down the ladder with his pistol in his hand and fired in self-defense.” – Randsburg Miner

September 03, 1905: “Among the gold producing centers of Southern California Kern county is the leader, followed by San Diego and San Bernardino. The Randsburg and Mojave camps are In Kern County, with the Yellow Aster as the heaviest producing mine. The Butte Lode, Hector, King Solomon and Monte Cristo mines are in the group.” – Los Angeles Herald

May 31, 1906: “HAROLD AND RHODY ASHFORD have leased the King Solomon for a year from J. J. Miller and have gone to work” – Randsburg Miner.

February 2, 1911: “FIFTY FOOT OF THE SHAFT on the SS foot level Watchman and Tait struck a ledge of $60 ore recently while cross cutting on their lease on a part of the grounds of the King Solomon group of mines. Ore extraction has commenced and a tonnage of ore large enough for a milling will soon be on the dump.—Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

March 05, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES – BUTTE LODE– E. M, Shipsey has sublet a number of leases In various parts of the Butte Lode mine of which he became lessee February 1, these subleases being In active demand since the discovery of the new vein at this property. Jim Rice has sold his lease on the King Solomon extension of the new vein to W. Halladay and bus secured a lease in the west shaft on the old Butte vein, which produced over $750,000. The star of luck which has followed Rice of late has not forsaken him, for he had been at work on the 150 foot level of the west shaft but a few days when he discovered a foot of ore, which pans between $50 and $60 per ton. Farther up the hill, southeast of the west shaft. Henry Zachry has been at work prospecting on the surface, and his efforts have been rewarded by the discovery of a four inch seam of ore panning about $100 per ton. The discovery is being prospected to determine its extent. The Butte Hill promises to enjoy one of the most prosperous years in its history during 1911. The success of leasers on the new vein has stimulated activity which has’ extended into the old workings and has resulted in the discovery of new ore there. The adjoining King Solomon mine has the extension of the vein, and several sets of leasers are taking out good ore.” – San Francisco Call

March 12, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES – WATCHMAN BROTHERS are milling 16 tons of high grade rock from the King Solomon mine, which adjoins the Butte on the east. The shoot from which this ore was mined is the extension of the new Butte vein and is proving Just as rich. When the Butte strike was made last fall prospecting immediately commenced on both sides of the discovery. The extension was discovered on the King Solomon ground and five or six sets of leasers have since been taking out ore. Up to the Watchman strike the ore has run between $25 and $100 per ton. From the wav the ore is plating at the Red Dog mill, where it is being treated, it is thought that it will be equally as good as the last milling made by Jim Rice on the Butte Lode which gave a recovery of about $150 per ton. Several other leasers are working on different exposures of the ore body. J. B. Walker has taken out 10 tons of good grade rock and will mill at the Red Dog mill as soon as his turn comes. Ore is being produced in such quantities now that the custom mills have more than they can do. Milling is also crippled by the cracking of a mortar at the Red Dog mill. Only five of its ten stamps can be run until a new mortar is received. Superintendent Chrlstensen states that there is more ore in sight for custom treatment than there has been for over a year. If the present rate of production-continues during the rest of the year and there is every reason to believe that it will not only continue to increase, the production of gold in the Rand district for 1911 will reach nearly $1.000,000 Tungsten included the product, on win probably be $1,246,000.”– San Francisco Call

May 07, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES CONTINUE TO KEEP UP their record for the production of high grade ore. This week we learn of more rich ore being taken out from ore bodies hitherto unknown. For several years the King Solomon has been operated feebly. Stimulated into action by the success of renewed efforts on every side, there has been found within 50 feet of the surface richer ore than has been mined in 12 years of operation. If mining in this district continues to be as productive as it has been during the last three months, with new discoveries adding figures to the bullion sheet, it will be hard to estimate what limit we may place-on our record of wealth for 1911. Four and a half tons of ore recently cleaned up at the Red Dog mill of the Stanford Mining and Reduction company at Johannesburg, Thursday, giving the operators of the. King Solomon mine a pleasant surprise. The ore plated $240 per ton, which was nearly twice as much as had been expected. This ore was taken from the shaft and dirt at a depth of about 50 feet. The vein at this depth is somewhat irregular, varying in width from 5 inches to 15 Inches. While it was realized that the ore being mined was high
grade rock, it was little thought that such large returns would be realized. This is the second milling of high grade rock taken from this mine In the last two months. Early in March 10 tons of ore were milled by Miller & Watchman Brothers, from which a plate recovery of about $170 per ton was made. Besides this the tailings assay between $26 and $40 per ton. The tailings from custom mill runs are purchased by the Stanford mining and Reduction Company and are cyanided when a sufficient amount of sands have accumulated to start the cyanide plant. Assays -of tailings from, this run have not yet been made, but it is thought that they will carry more than $25 per ton. This will result in a total saving of about $265 per ton. The vein being opened up is a continuation of the rich ore body, found on the Butte Lode Mining Company’s property last fall, from which thousands of dollars have already been produced. Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

May 21, 1911: “SINKING ON KING SOLOMON – Sinking has been resumed at the new shaft at the King Solomon mine, and will he continued until the 100 foot level is reached. On the 50 foot level the west drift has reached the boundary of the claim and the mining of ore has been suspended, on that level. As the strike of the vein is away from the west boundary, more extensive workings will be had west of the shafton the 100 foot level. Ten tons of ore have been taken out and are available for milling. Much of this material shows free gold. The last milling of four and a half tons netted $240 per ton on the places, beside $25 in the tailings, making a total recovery of $1,132.60. J. J. Miller, owner of the King Solomon mine, is directing this work. The vein being worked by him is an extension of the rich ore body being mined by Ed Shipsey lessee of the Butte Lode mining company, who owns the adjoining property. — Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

May 21, 1911: “SINKING ON KING SOLOMON – Sinking has been resumed at the new shaft at the King Solomon mine, and will he continued until the 100 foot level is reached. On the 50 foot level the west drift has reached the boundary of the claim and the mining of ore has been suspended, on that level. As the strike of the vein is away from the west boundary, more extensive workings will be had west of the shaft on the 100 foot level. Ten tons of ore have been taken out and are available for milling. Much of this material shows free gold. The last milling of four and a half tons netted $240 per ton on the places, beside $25 in the tailings, making a total recovery of $1,132.60. J. J. Miller, owner of the King Solomon mine, is directing this work. The vein being worked by him is an extension of the rich ore body being mined by Ed Shipsey lessee of the Butte Lode mining company, who owns the adjoining property. — Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

June 03, 1911: “KING SOLOMON SINKING. Sinking has been resumed at the new shaft at the King Solomon Mine, and will be continued until the one hundred foot level is reached. On the fifty foot level the west drift has reached the boundary of the claim, and the mining of ore has been suspended on that level. As the strike of the vein is away from the west boundary, more extensive workings will he had west of the shaft on the hundred foot level. Ten tons of ore have been taken out and are available for milling. Much of this material shows free gold. The last milling of four and a half tons netted two hundred and forty dollars per ton on the plates, beside twenty-five dollars in the tailings, making a total recovery of $1192.50. Randsburg Miner.” – Mohave County Miner

July 09, 1911: KING SOLOMON —The Miller & Watchman lease continues to produce steadily. The shaft has reached a depth of 100 feet. The vein is 18 inches wide and pans $50 per ton in gold. Frank Buy is preparing to sink the Zachry shaft another 50 feet. Several tons of ore extracted from the 100 foot level will be milled in the near future. The ore is of good grade and will probably mill between $40 and $50 per ton. ” – San Francisco Call

July 23, 1911: “KING SOLOMON— and Buys cleaned up five tons of $18 rock at the Red Dog mill this week. Miller and Watchman are milling 30 tons of medium grade ore at the Red Dog mill. The ore was extracted principally from the east drift on the-100 foot level.” – San Francisco Call

July 30, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINING DISTRICT– The Miller &. Watchman lease continues to produce steadily. The shaft has reached a depth of 100 feet. The vein is 18 inches wide and pans $50 per ton in gold.” – San Francisco Call

February 2, 1911: “Fifty feet south of the shaft on the SS foot level Watchman and Tait struck a ledge of $60 ore recently while cross cutting on their lease on a part of the grounds of the King Solomon group of mines. Ore extraction has commenced and a tonnage of ore large enough for a milling will soon be on the dump.—Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

March 05, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES – BUTTE LODE– E. M, Shipsey has sublet a number of leases In various parts of the Butte Lode mine of which he became lessee February 1, these subleases being In active demand since the discovery of the new vein at this property. Jim Rice has sold his lease on the King Solomon extension of the new vein to W. Halladay and bus secured a lease in the west shaft on the old Butte vein, which produced over $750,000. The star of luck which has followed Rice of late has not forsaken him, for he had been at work on the 150 foot level of the west shaft but a few days when he discovered a foot of ore, which pans between $50 and $60 per ton. Farther up the hill, southeast of the west shaft. Henry Zachry has been at work prospecting on the surface, and his efforts have been rewarded by the discovery of a four inch seam of ore panning about $100 per ton. The discovery is being prospected to determine its extent. The Butte Hill promises to enjoy one of the most prosperous years in its history during 1911. The success of leasers on the new vein has stimulated activity which has’ extended into the old workings and has resulted in the discovery of new ore there. The adjoining King Solomon mine has the extension of the vein, and several sets of leasers are taking out good ore.” – San Francisco Call

March 12, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES – WATCHMAN BROTHERS are milling 16 tons of high grade rock from the King Solomon mine, which adjoins the Butte on the east. The shoot from which this ore was mined is the extension of the new Butte vein and is proving Just as rich. When the Butte strike was made last fall prospecting immediately commenced on both sides of the discovery. The extension was discovered on the King Solomon ground and five or six sets of leasers have since been taking out ore. Up to the Watchman strike the ore has run between $25 and $100 per ton. From the wav the ore is plating at the Red Dog mill, where it is being treated, it is thought that it will be equally as good as the last milling made by Jim Rice on the Butte Lode which gave a recovery of about $150 per ton. Several other leasers are working on different exposures of the ore body. J. B. Walker has taken out 10 tons of good grade rock and will mill at the Red Dog mill as soon as his turn comes. Ore is being produced in such quantities now that the custom mills have more than they can do. Milling is also crippled by the cracking of a mortar at the Red Dog mill. Only five of its ten stamps can be run until a new mortar is received. Superintendent Chrlstensen states that there is more ore in sight for custom treatment than there has been for over a year. If the present rate of production-continues during the rest of the year and there is every reason to believe that it will not only continue to increase, the production of gold in the Rand district for 1911 will reach nearly $1.000,000 Tungsten included the product, on win probably be $1,246,000.”– San Francisco Call

May 07, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINES CONTINUE TO KEEP UP their record for the production of high grade ore. This week we learn of more rich ore being taken out from ore bodies hitherto unknown. For several years the King Solomon has been operated feebly. Stimulated into action by the success of renewed efforts on every side, there has been found within 50 feet of the surface richer ore than has been mined in 12 years of operation. If mining in this district continues to be as productive as it has been during the last three months, with new discoveries adding figures to the bullion sheet, it will be hard to estimate what limit we may place-on our record of wealth for 1911.

Four and a half tons of ore recently cleaned up at the Red Dog mill of the Stanford Mining and Reduction Company at Johannesburg, Thursday, giving the operators of the King Solomon mine a pleasant surprise. The ore plated $240 per ton, which was nearly twice as much as had been expected. This ore was taken from the shaft and dirt at a depth of about 50 feet. The vein at this depth is somewhat irregular, varying in width from 5 inches to 15 Inches. While it was realized that the ore being mined was high grade rock, it was little thought that such large returns would be realized. This is the second milling of high grade rock taken from this mine in the last two months. Early in March 10 tons of ore were milled by Miller & Watchman Brothers, from which a plate recovery of about $170 per ton was made. Besides this the tailings assay between $26 and $40 per ton. The tailings from custom mill runs are purchased by the Stanford mining and Reduction Company and are cyanided when a sufficient amount of sands have accumulated to start the cyanide plant. Assays -of tailings from, this run have not yet been made, but it is thought that they will carry more than $25 per ton. This will result in a total saving of about $265 per ton. The vein being opened up is a continuation of the rich ore body, found on the Butte Lode Mining Company’s property last fall, from which thousands of dollars have already been produced. Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

May 21, 1911: “SINKING ON KING SOLOMON – Sinking has been resumed at the new shaft at the King Solomon mine, and will he continued until the 100 foot level is reached. On the 50 foot level the west drift has reached the boundary of the claim and the mining of ore has been suspended, on that level. As the strike of the vein is away from the west boundary, more extensive workings will be had west of the shaft on the 100 foot level. Ten tons of ore have been taken out and are available for milling. Much of this material shows free gold. The last milling of four and a half tons netted $240 per ton on the places, beside $25 in the tailings, making a total recovery of
$1,132.60. J. J. Miller, owner of the King Solomon mine, is directing this work. The vein being worked by him is an extension of the rich ore body being mined by Ed Shipsey lessee of the Butte Lode mining company, who owns the adjoining property. — Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

June 03, 1911: “KING SOLOMON SINKING. Sinking has been resumed at the new shaft at the King Solomon Mine, and will be continued until the one hundred foot level is reached. On the fifty foot level the west drift has reached the boundary of the claim, and the mining of ore has been suspended on that level. As the strike of the vein is away from the west boundary, more extensive workings will he had west of the shaft on the hundred foot level. Ten tons of ore have been taken out and are available for milling. Much of this material shows free gold. The last milling of four and a half tons netted two hundred and forty dollars per ton on the plates, beside twenty-five dollars in the tailings, making a total recovery of $1192.50. Randsburg Miner.” – Mohave County Miner

July 09, 1911: “KING SOLOMON —The Miller & Watchman lease continues to produce steadily. The shaft has reached a depth of 100 feet. The vein is 18 inches wide and pans $50 per ton in gold. Frank Buy is preparing to sink the Zachry shaft another 50 feet. Several tons of ore extracted from the 100 foot level will be milled in the near future. The ore is of good grade and will probably mill between $40 and $50 per ton. ” – San Francisco Call

July 30, 1911: “RANDSBURG MINING DISTRICT– The Miller &. Watchman lease continues to produce steadily. The shaft has reached a depth of 100 feet. The vein is 18 inches wide and pans $50 per ton in gold.” – San Francisco Call

November 10, 1912: “A CLEAN UP WAS MADE recently at the Red Dog mill at Johannesburg from a run of 25 tons of ore extracted from the Teagle-Lamberson lease on the King Solomon. The ore plated more than $40 per ton and yielded a brick of $1,100 This ore was extracted from the 75 and 125 foot levels. The ore shoots are holding out well and a large production can be expected from this lease. —Randsburg Miner. ” — San Francisco Call

August 13, 1911: “KING SOLOMON & WATCHMAN report a good showing of ore on the King Solomon. This ore is a continuation of the rich ore shoot which was discovered on the Butte a few months ago. Ten tons of high grade ore has been stoped from the 100 foot level during the last week. —Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

Ed. Shipsey Formed the Shipsey Mining Co. in 1912. The Corporation is now owned Primarily by Karl Dresselhouse.

December 15, 1912: “C. J. LEHMAN OF LOS ANGELES secured a half interest from Ed Shipsey in the King Solomon. The purchase price could not be learned, but is said to be a large figure. Since buying the King Solomon about six months ago, Shipsey has realized a handsome profit from the property. The ore that has been extracted from the mine in the last six months has netted more than the purchase price alone.—Randsburg Miner.” – San Francisco Call

March 09, 1913: “GOOD DESERT CLEANUPS AT THE RED DOG MILL, the Johannesburg- custom plant, a cleanup was made this week from 35 tons of ore from the King Solomon. The ore averaged $70 a ton, yielding a $2,450 gold brick.” – San Francisco Call

March 09, 1913: “A CLEANUP WAS MADE this week at the same mill (Red Dog) from 32 tons of ore which was extracted from the 85 foot level of the Wicker-Drennen-Walton-Jensen lease on the King Solomon grounds during the month. The ore averaged $45 per ton the recovery resulting in a $1,425 gold brick. Five tons of ore was extracted since then.” – San Francisco Call

March 22, 1913: “FIVE AND ONE-QUARTER TONS of ore from the Hector, one of the claims of the King Solomon group, is being milled at the Red Dog mill at Johannesburg. Al. Sanderson has been leasing on this property for some time. A clean-up will be made today.” – Randsburg Miner

July 06, 1913: “IN THE RANDSBURG DISTRICT the Consolidated Mines Company is displaying much activity and the new plant recently installed is handling an excellent grade of ore. The famous Yellow Aster Company is maintaining a heavy output and the present year promises to be one of the most prosperous in the history of the corporation. Considerable new equipment has been recently installed and an immense quantity of commercial quartz is being mined by the quarry process. A dividend of $25,000 was declared May 28, bringing the total profit disbursements of this company to $1,161,789. The King Solomon, Butte and several other Randsburg mines are shipping steadily. The: Red Dog custom mill at Johannesburg is handling large consignments of ore for lessees: – San Francisco Call

July 12, 1913: “A FINAL CLEANUP OF FORTY THREE TONS of ore from the Teagle- Lamberson lease on a block of the King Solomon group resulted in a gold brick to the value of $2,100 or approximately $49 a ton The ore was treated at the Red Dog Mill at Johannesburg This is the last milling from the lease which expired June 15th and which netted thousands of dollars to the leasers. A milling of forty one tons of ore from the lease on a block of the King Solomon group yielded $2,100 at the Red Dog mill of
Johannesburg, The ore averaged 51 a ton This lease also expired on the 15th of this month Randsburg Miner,” – Mojave County Miner

August 2, 1913: “SEVERAL CLEAN-UPS FROM KING SOLOMON GROUP—This camp is certainly coming into its own this summer as seen by the present activity. The King Solomon group of mines continues to attract the most attention. A clean-up was made Thursday at the Red Dog Mill from a milling of 45 tons of ore from this mine. The ore averaged $80 a ton, the recovery being a gold brick valued at $2,700. This ore was extracted from a block of ground operated by Ed Shipsey. Both hoists are now running and considerable ore is being extracted from the Lamberson shaft. Another clean-up was made Thursday at the Red Dog from 10 ½ tons of ore which were extracted from a block of ground operated under lease by Jack Nosser, John Appadoca, and Thos. Murphy. $1,140 was the result of the clean-up. The average being $110 per ton. This lease is looking good and stoping will be continued as soon as the shaft is completed to the 250 foot level.” – Randsburg Miner

King Solomon Mine/Mill, Ten Miners & Boy, ca 1915 -According to the late Betty Hadley, who so kindly let us copy this photo for our use, this photo which included her father was taken circa 1915. Hadley Collection

1915: “KING SOLOMON CONSOLIDATED MINES COMPANY, consists of 90 acres, in Sec. 35, T. 29 S., R. 40 E., M. D. M., ¾ of a mile west of Johannesburg in the Rand district. Owners, King Solomon Consolidated Mines Company of Los Angeles. E. Shipsey, president; J. Shipsey, superintendent. Elevation 3900 feet. Vein is a 3 feet wide, granite foot wall and porphyry hanging. Pay shoot said to be 1400 feet long, free milling. Workings consist of a shaft 520 feet deep, levels every 50 feet, 1400-foot drift and stopes. Mine equipment consist s of a 20 h. p. West Coast hoist, cars, and ore bin. Ore is reduced at Red Dog Custom mill. Ten men are employed. Adjoining mines, Butte and Gold Consolidated.” – G. Chester Brown

Then & Now Composite, 1915-2011 – William J. Warren © 2012

April 23, 1915: “THE KING SOLOMON GROUP OF MINES, comprising seven claims, were located in 1896 by the three Ashford brothers, Rhoda, Henry, and Harold, and are situated just east of the town, on the main road to Johannesburg. Having no money of their own to spend in developing the property they took in a Mr. Bull as partner. After three years of legal entanglements the Bull interests were taken over by Miller.

This was during the summer of 1912, and the new combination was known as the Ashford Mining Company. Under the new firm a big force of men were put as work and the mine, which for a long time had been idle, now took on an air of prosperity. From now on the King Solomon group began to take lead as one of the richest producers in the district. Many leases on this property were also taken, and large milling returns attested the value of these claims. In 1908 another change in ownership occurred, in which Mr. Miller remained as sole proprietor, who in June of 1912 sold out to Mr. Edward Shipsey. February of 1914 say this group of mines turned into a stock company, now known as the Shipsey Mining Company, with a capital of $500,000.The present company, under the direction of Mr. Shipsey, is doing very extensive development work, and the richness of the ore taken out during the past twelve months fully warranting the outlay. Besides the main shaft there are five other leasers. The ore from this property since its discovery has averaged $50 per ton and up to the present over $1, 500,000- has been taken out.” – Randsburg Miner

November 20, 1917: “THE SHIPSEY MINING COMPANY is successfully operating the King Solomon group.” — Bakersfield Californian

February 16, 1923: “Randsburg, Feb. 16, — OWING TO THE SHORTNESS OF SUFFIECIENT WATER for mining or mill purposes, most everyone is adding tankage to their properties.  The latest acquisition has been made by the King Solomon mill.  They have just brought in a standard railroad oil tank, capacity 10,000 gallons, which has been trucked up on the hill above their mill.  General Manager McDonald believes that there will be no more shutdowns for him this winter.” – Bakersfield Californian

May 26, 1923: The King Solomon is now in good milling ore. ”—Bakersfield Californian

May 26, 1923:  “Among the old timers of Randsburg, can be found a number of successful leasers, the king that back up their belief with many long days of hard work in prospecting and development.  As in lease of Mattingly and Drain, where it cost them four months hard work, besides the powder, steel, etc. following a small seam before they found the quartz with the free gold running through it in the King Solomon mine.” – Bakersfield Californian

December 25, 1923: “Development on the 300 of the King Solomon is satisfactory.  They still have the gold vein picked up a month ago for the 15 feet that they have drifted on it.  The width holds from 6 inches to 12 inches.  At 25 feet from the shaft, they have opened a chute that may give them a good block of milling ore.  All of the development under way is of a prospecting nature.  Supt. Ray Drain is confident that when they commence taking out the ore that they will keep the company’s five stamps dropping continuously.” – Bakersfield Californian

February 22, 1924: “ 10-DAY MILL RUN AMOUNTS TO $1500.—President Shipsey Visits King Solomon Mine to See Cleanup—Randsburg, Feb. 22.—President Ed Shipsey of the King Solomon mine arrived Sunday from his home at Pasadena in time to see the company’s cleanup of 41 tons in a 10-day run.  The amalgam sent to the United States mint was valued at $1500.  This ore was taken out in developing an advancement on the 300 level of a cross-cut of 150 feet to catch the Magpie vein.  It is still some 40 feet from the face of the crosscut.  The miners have picked up a new lead in the advancement that looks very encouraging.  It pans all right, but not opened enough for the officials to at this time make any statement.

Now that the company’s ore has been run off, the leasers on the 450 level will soon have their 100-ton milling finished.

The leasers have broken into very good milling ore that is expected to average $50 to the ton.  Leasers need no assays to warrant them as to what the ore will run.  The panning process in the Randsburg and “stringer” fields never fails, besides, leasers never let their imagination interfere with what it ought to go to.

The King Solomon has an abundance of water, pumping from the Consolidated Mines in Fiddler gulch.

President Shipsey is one of the pioneers of the Rand mining district, being one of the fortunate leasers that could find it when the other fellow got tired.”—Bakersfield Californian

February 27, 1924: “KING SOLOMON IS GETTING GOOD ORE—Miners Hit Likely Looking Rock in Crosscut of 300-Foot Level.—What may prove to be a strike worth while has been brought in this week at the King Solomon mine, located over the eastern hill, one-half mile from Randsburg.  In the crosscut on the 300 level, at 540 feet, the miners hit into a likely looking lead last Sunday, that panned a little.  Monday they still had it for eight feet.  Breaking four feet a day brought the end of the vein, showing 15 feet, all in ore, Thursday afternoon.  They state that all of 15 feet will go as good as $10 or better.  With their own milling plant receiving the extraction from the shaft into the bin even at $10, the management has no fear of another shutdown from now on.

The company is not in the market selling stock.  True, the mine has been on the market at a very reasonable figure and was tied up by a local company that spent a lot of money through its engineers, in trying to make millings from what was left in the developed laterals.  At 40 feet in the present advancement, they cut through nearly a three-foot vein, 35 tons of that pickup milled them $1500, but the advancement on towards the Magpie vein continued on with the above result.  According to surveys it is another 30 feet to the Goal.  Superintendent Ray Drain believes that there is a chance to pick up another vein before they reach their destination; surface showing indicate the possibility of one, and they are now going after results with the crosscuts.

The King Solomon mill is running on ore from the leasers’ output on the 500 level.  Pannings call for as good as free milling gold ore at about $25.  A hundred tons is the estimate of the present run, the leasers still being in as good if not better value.  President Edward Shipsey is very conservative.  Like the successful seeker after the yellow stuff, it is better to wait a day and be sure, as in the present hard digging of Elder and Stokes.  For many weeks they have and are putting in a lot of time and work carrying out a lease on a gold prospect.  After a careful prospecting on the surface they picked up a small stringer, rich but not large enough to extract.  They decided to sink on it and are now down better than 30 feet and the little seam still stands up coaxing them along.  In both these cases one can readily understand that as far as the gold mining industry of this district is concerned, that it is always found at the surface or grass roots, but it requires grit, experience and hare work to bring it home.”–Bakersfield Californian

January 28, 1924:  “Still doing a lot of developing on the 300 of the King Solomon mine.  Leasers are on the 450 of this old producer are in nice ore, already for milling.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 5, 1924: “Bob Gunderson, owner of the Minnesota group of claims, and Emil and Fred T. Culbert, owners of the Josephine group, have agreed to work together and bring in a good gold producing property.  They have a gas hoist in, plenty of steel, and powder, besides the grub and everything that a bunch of hard rocks require to go ahead.

Gunderson, in prospecting this particular part of the Minnesota holdings, one of the oldest in the “stringer” portion of the Rand gold zone, put down the prospect shafts within a distance of 100 feet, all showing the vein two feet in place.  In doing this work he milled $2800.

The Culbert brothers have a well proved property.  One of their development shows a wall that cannot be equaled in the entire district with ore that would pay if a mill was on the ground.  They believe it will improve with development.

There are many shallow shafts and adits on both the groups, that have made handsome returns, but like the early-day mining, when they hit the sulphides or breaks they tried another promising site.

Without any question, a geologist that is interested in his calling would find this particular part of the gold fields a study for many days.  Adits, generally called, and known as tunnels on a hillside, have produced many thousands of dollars.  When the pickings quit, it was decided to run a long tunnel.  Under the best pay a 300-foot tunnel brought no results.  A 150-run-in as a crosscut, found ore but not in place.  Float can be found on any part of the hill.

Hundreds of claims in the “stringer” show shallow workings that have paid and paid good but no developing followed after the ore ceased.  It is hoped that in the joining of interests and hitting the drills will bring the results of the trio’s good judgment.”—Bakersfield Californian

August 15, 1924: “WORK ON THE KING SOLOMON has commenced again after the month of July taken as a vacation, and the particular line will be a continuation of the east drift on the big 15-foor vein, for possibly 300 feet. It is the desire of the present management to decide as to where the new vertical shaft will be located, and with this new improvement another unit of five stamps will be added. And in the meantime the work on the upraise for the purpose of making a connection with the old workings on the Magpie, for ventilation will progress as usual.” – Randsburg Times

February 18, 1925: “ARIZONA CAPITAL INVADING RAND—San Francisco Gold Mining Company to Expend $25,000 in Work.  Representatives of the San Francisco Gold Mining Company, operating in the Oatman, Arizona district, have decided to enter active operations in the Randsburg gold belt and from the wonderful showing made by Ray Drain in the King Solomon Mine, are convinced that with an expenditure of $25,000 in development work they can bring in one of the sensational gold producers of by-gone days.  It is the intention to raise from the 300 on a new shaft up the hill from the old one and sink 200 feet from the third level a total of 500 feet; adding another unit of five stamps to the plant now connecting with the old shat; the ore from the new or main shaft would be trammed to the mill.  Drifting and cross-cutting of some 100 feet each would also be in order.

Amongst the San Francisco Company people that came up from Los Angeles, Pasadena, and San Diego, was Clyde E. Miller, J. N. Knight, J. H. Thomas and Cap. Hessler.  Edward Shipsey, president of the Shipsey Company, this company being the owners of the King Solomon group.

DRAINS DEVELOPMENT—During Mr. Drains’ activities on his lease he has run 400 feet of drifting, 200 feet ease and the same west on the 300 level.  When they first hit into the vein from the 300 it showed some 10 feet of ledge and widened out to 15 feet, at some 80 feet it began to pinch back to the 10-foot and after the 130 feet is narrowed down in some places as low as a foot, but the value of the ore held good.  A remarkable milling showed near to $25 a ton.  The best mill returns show $24.97 and the others will run about $24.50 a ton.  The ore is simply a free milling gold ore.

The development and advance work now being done on the King Solomon 300 is cross cutting with the hopes of encountering two new ledges with an opportunity of picking up the Hector vein, a vein that has in its day given up many thousands of dollars in gold ore that the space writer likes to class as “jewelry rock.”

BIG BUTTE INTERESTED – Right on the heels of the Oatman crowd comes a bunch of the Big Butte heavy stockholders to size up the situation from a mining view.  Last Sunday’s investigation of the local strikes in the silver field, the steady and continuous work with good results on the many leases in the old gold producers soon convinced the Big Butte interests that now is the time to get together and finance the mine that really called the mining world’s attention to the greatest gold surface showing in the world.  Bar none.

The glad word from the Southern Sierras Power Company is that the Silver Basin Mining Company will have their plant in readiness for the juice to resume active operations.  It is in the proven gold belt side lining of the old Black Hawk mine, on which property local leasers are making splendid returns.” – Bakersfield Californian

March 3, 1925:  “Superintendent Ray Drain reports everything going along nicely in the advancement of the 300-foot level of the King Solomon.  He states that in another month they will have a crosscut on the third level out 100 feet, at which point they will start a raise of 50 feet to connect with the workings of the Magpie shaft.  With this opening the under workings will have an abundance of good air and the real mining operations will follow.  Another shift of “hard rocks” will be added in the new working shaft.  After all of this development and advancement is well under way, say two months, the mine and mill will be going at their best.Prominent officials of the San Francisco Gold are coming up from Los Angeles next Saturday to have a look over their new holdings—the King Solomon mine and mill, on Gold Hill overlooking the camp of Randsburg.”—Bakersfield Californian

MARCH 1925: “THE KING SOLOMON MINE comprising five and a fraction claims, is owned by the North Rand Silver Mining Company. The property located just southwest of Johannesburg, is developed by several shafts, the main shaft being 2 compartment, inclined, and 480 feet deep measured on the incline. There are seven mine levels, the deepest being 480 feet, and approximately 9000 feet of workings. Three winzes extend below the 480 level. The values in the veins are quite erratic. In general they cling close to the hanging wall of the veins in connected but more or less irregular bunches. The best ore which has been mined occurred adjacent to the main shaft between the 300 level and the surface.

The present daily mine production is about five tons, or enough to keep the 5-stamp amalgamation mill operating one shift each day. No concentrators are used in the mill since the ore contains almost no sulfides, being completely oxidized and free milling.

The average grade of the ore mined is such that approximately $25.00 is caught on the plates for each ton milled. The gold produced is worth about $15.00 according to the mine superintendent. Mine returns indicate a fineness of about 780.

The total production of the property is not definitely known due to the methods of keeping accounts in the early life of the property, but it is estimated to be between $300,000 and $500,000. The production for the three months ending July 19, 1923, amounted to 659.5 ounces of gold.” – Hulin

May 13, 1925:  “GOLD STRIKE REPORTED FROM RANDSBURG MINE—Officers of the San Francisco Gold Mines Company, operating the King Solomon group in the Randsburg district, reported today the discovery of two feet of high-grade gold ore on the 300-foot level of the Magpie vein.  Assays from an average sample showed returns of $82.40 and $180. 40.  The mine superintendent reported later that the vein continues to show the same value, and is expected to shoot upward for 200 feet to connect with the old Magpie shaft.

The management stated that the same vein was worked several years ago by lessors who took a large tonnage of high-grade ore to a depth of 114 feet in the vein.

The San Francisco Company formerly operated in the Oatman district in Arizona.  Its stock is listed on the Los Angeles Stock Exchange.”—Bakersfield Californian

May 15, 1925: “SAN FRANCISCO GOLD, now operating the King Solomon mine, Randsburg, is a popular listed stock on the Los Angeles Exchange. With commencement of drifting on the Magpie vein, work hereafter will be done alternately on this vein and the crosscut heading south. Better footage is looked for with this plan. The crosscut is going through a softer formation and hopes of encountering the contact are very bright. Two stopes, the east and west, are now supplying the mill with a good grade of free milling ore that will run along $20 to the ton. What may prove a high grade milling ore has been encountered in Magpie vein of the King Solomon.” – Randsburg Times

June 9, 1925: “OLD KING SOLOMON MINE IS WORKED- Vigorous development of the King Solomon group of gold claims, located in the heart of the Randsburg district, has been started by the San Francisco Gold Mines Company.  From the 200-foot level of the shaft on the Magpie claim, where excellent ore was opened several months ago, a 200-foot winze is being sunk, and a crosscut extended to cut the noted Butte ledge.  The property has been a consistent producer for over 15 years, and is equipped with mining machinery, a stamp mill, and several buildings.

The King Solomon is credited with a yield of $500,000, and the new work is figured to extend the production zone, open veins demonstrated in the adjoining Butte mine and other noted properties, and recover rich shoots worked by leasers in the early days of the mine.  The San Francisco Gold Mines Company, for several years worked holdings in the Oatman, Ariz. District with good results.  R. A. Drain is superintendent.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 5, 1925: “HAS AGAIN PICKED UP VEIN—Following the lines of practical experience as a hard rock miner and leaser and chloride, Ray Drain, superintendent of the King Solomon mine, is certainly making history for the gold end of the California Rand Mining district.  As a leaser of this old reliable gold producer he succeeded in finding the ore by taking the only chance –crosscutting.  So, when the principals of the San Francisco Gold Mining Co., took over the property they had a well developed gold producing mine.

His latest success in the work, as planned, is the picking up of a lost vein on the 800 level, which had faulted at about 20 feet west of the of the vein crosscut south.  Drifting was resumed on the fault for a distance of 72 feet, at which point they found the vein again and it shows 4 and a half feet of milling ore.

General Manager Miller, and four others, spent Decoration Day underground in the King Solomon looking at the workings below the surface.

Three of those visitors were prospective owners, but the fourth was only Old Man Times, but he enjoyed the trip in the dark as well as any of them.

The clean-up for the month of May, by the San Francisco Gold, in its five-stamp mill at the King Solomon mine, shows returns of 90 ounces from the 84 tons milled.” – Randsburg Times

August 2, 1925: “SAN FRANCISCO GOLD—STRIKE – A visit to the forty-foot winze from the 300 foot level in the King Solomon mine, found a remarkable showing in places as they went down.  The vein measured six feet, and for the first forty feet it will do better than five feet, and both walls are showing good and strong.

Superintendent Ray Drain finds that better time and efficiency can be made by running all of the ore and breakdown to the six by eight winze through the screener into the mill bins.  With two shifts in the winze, the extraction of ore can keep the bins filled for the three shifts in charge of their dumps.  They are using only 18 ounces of quick and at that rate the mill returns on this bunch of high-grade milling ore could run along $30.00 per ton.

At the bottom of the shaft the vein is as strong and rich as any part of the forty feet passed through.

PRESENT REPUTATION IN THE WORLD—In addition to great silver producer of California, also the greatest tungsten mine in the world, the Rand mining district is now in line for the bringing in of another gold mine, a fact that will do much toward the bringing back of the good name of Rand district and Randsburg into the lists of producing mines.

As it has been told through the Mining Congress of the West, never a dollar of mining capital has found its way into this district.

All of the great finds of the past, gold, silver, or tungsten, have been found on top or the ground—in any other district they would call if from the “grass roots,” but where is the grass?

When the faults appeared, or in some cases, one will hear when the sulphides appeared, further dead work was out of the question for the         that there was nothing like reserve funds on hand.  With the exception of a limited number of         given on some of the larger mines, little or no development has been made in the gold district for years.

Some two years ago, Ray Drain and Walter Mattingly secured a working lease on the King Solomon mine, a twelve-months lease and for the best part of a year they found the going pretty rough, but coming on to the close of the lease, the small fissure that they had picked up, began to widen and their returns were about to repay them for their hard work.  In the meantime, a company had an option on the mine, and an engineer, ran a cross cut to meet the leasers drift.  When that lease ended the company proceeded to get the rich ore, some $10,000, of which they went to prospecting in an opposite part of the mine.  After floundering about, mostly in trying to see if there was a possibility that something in their favor might have been overlooked by the previous leasers, the company ceased their operations and pulled their equipment.  After a reasonable wait, Mr. Drain made a proposition to the principals of the Shipsey Mining Company owners of the King Solomon Mine and mill, which was accepted.  Upon  his return to Randsburg with an option-lease, the cleaning up of the lower workings for safety was the first work to be done, the next being the continuation of the cross-cut left off by the previous workers at their departure.  In the first twenty feet they cut the vein—the same vien that today is showing all the marks of making a gold mine.  Owing to a number of provisions called for in the lease, this find could not be opened.  For instance, one crosscut of 200 feet, an upraise of 160 feet and other advancements.  At that, Drain ran into ore the kept his work going, and with only four other workers-millman, topman, and two hardrock miners.

SELLS HIS OPTION—During a visit of Los Angeles from his summer vacation camp above Bishop, last season, Drain met with the principals of the San Francisco Gold Mining Company of Oatman, Arizona, listed on the Los Angeles Exchange, who, after examining the property and a favorable report from their experts, immedaitly closed a deal for the taking over of the King Solomon group, accepting the conditions of development called for.  Now that all of the provisions are completed, the extracting of the ore and the running of the mill on three regular shifts is a regular routing business.

The plans of the San Francisco Gold management are for the sinking of the present winze to a depth of 200 feet should the values continue down, or if formation is favorable at depth, another 200 feet will be sunk.  It is the intention of the S. F. Gold to sing a vertical or main shaft of at least one thousand feet, with favorable showing in the present sinkings, an upraise of 300 feet will follow.

George R. Colton is a practical mining man, acquiring his knowledge greatly at Searchlight.  Before investing his good money, he made several trips to the district, and being convinced that the King Solomon, like the Rand district, were only just scratched on the surface, he took over a large interest and later became the presiding officer.

C. E. Miller, of the Firm of C. E. Miller & Co., a member of the Los Angeles stock exchange, accompanied Mr. Colton in his week end visit.  From a number of specimens and the bundle of Randsburg Times, that crowded their car on their return trip home Sunday, Mr. Miller will be apt to stop proceedings at the Monday meet of the Exchange.”—Randsburg Times

October 12, 1925: “GOOD RESULTS SHOWN IN RANDSBURG MINE—Favorable results, following closely one after the other, have recently attended work being performed in the development of the property of the San Francisco Gold Mines Company in the Randsburg district, according to President George R. Colton of Los Angeles, who has just returned from a visit to the mine.

In the No. 4 winze on the Magpie vein, the bottom is now in a body of high-grade sulphide ore, and Mr. Colton states that on the five-foot face in the east drift on the 100-foot level, there is an occurrence of two feet of ore, consisting of hard quartz, spotted with manganese, which should run from $50 to $500 in gold to the ton, judging from pannings, some of the gold being free and coarse.

From this new source of supply a few tons of ore will be taken daily and added to the regular run of mill ore.  This, Mr. Colton says, will “sweeten” the heads, with a proportionately greater increase in the value of clean-ups.”—Bakersfield Californian

April 1926: “NEW EQUIPMENT PLANNED—Crusher and Concentrator for King Solomon Mine.  Because of the steadily increasing content of its ores on the 500-foot level, the San Francisco Gold Mines Co. of Randsburg, Kern County, is planning the addition of crusher and concentrating tables to its milling plant at King Solomon mine, according to George R. Colton, of Los Angeles, president.  The vein on the 500 -foot level east of the shaft, is reported by Supt. R. A. Drain to have widened to six feet of solid quartz, three feet of which is said to show values of from $20 to $25 to the ton.  On the 500-foot level west drift chutes are being placed in raises preparatory to ore extraction.  The plant has been temporarily closed down after having turned out $25,000 in gold bullion in 1925.  With the addition of the crusher and concentrating table, however milling operations will be resumed.”—Southwest Mining News Service

December 15, 1930: “Carwymac, Inc., of Los Angeles, George H. Wyman, Manager, 305 Hibernian Building, Los Angeles, is sampling the tailings at the King Solomon Gold Mine, near Randsburg, California. They are now handling the great hill of tailings at the Yellow Aster Mine.”—The Mining Journal

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