RANDSBURG OTHER MINES AND CLAIMS

Survey number:      Owner:      Date of discovery:

While it is the intention of the Rand Desert Museum to have each claim posted in to the CLAIMS portion of each town this may not happen for some time while the mechanics of the Claims section are worked out.  In the mean time we are posting that information here so that is available to you.  When we get the CLAIMS portion of the web site up and working it will be much easier to conduct a search of a specific claim or claim owner.

Thank you for your patience.

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BULLY BOY (LUCKY BOY)

1962: “Located –NW ¼ NE1/4 sec. 11m TS30, R40E, MDM 1 ½ miles south of Randsburg.—Five claims.  Six shafts inclined approximately 55 degrees to north, 3 vertical shafts from 50 to 185 feet in depth with drifts as long as 250 feet. Principal mining done 1899 to 1902, 1928, 1937-1941 and 1946 -1947.  Production reported to be valued at $120,000.”  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Divisions of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

January 24, 1897: “A PARTY CONSISTING OF G. W. Chrisman, Leon Cerf, James Daly, and E. E. S. Hall of Ventura, G. L. Chamberlain, Mr. Forbes and the writer (C. J. McDivitt) of Randsburg, started out southwest yesterday to see the mines. The first one visited, was the Mattie, Mr. Wilkinson the owner and three men were at work and had quite a pile of sacks on the dump. Next the Bully Boy was visited, but no one was at work, and no information could be obtained._ _ _ _ “– Los Angeles Times

January 28, 1897: “A RICH STRIKE was made today on the Bully Boy, out toward the Stringer country, and about one and a half miles from town.  This mine has always shown wonderfully rich ore, but a very small vein.  In one place it had apparently pinched out, but in sinking deeper a vein of high grade ore of several feet in thickness was reached.”  – Los Angeles Times

1904:  “LOCATED in section 2, T30, R40, near Randsburg. It was an unpatented claim, developed by three incline shafts of 75 to 190 feet deep, 50 feet of tunnel and 700 feet of drifts. It was owned by T. W. Atkinson, and J. F. Pitt of Randsburg.”  — Aubrey

January 20, 1897:  “JUST WEST OF THE MATTIE lays the Bully Boy, owned by Coulters and Atkinson.  This is an exceptionally rich but small vein, and they have taken out between three and five thousand dollars, some of the ore running as high as $200 per ton.”  Los Angeles Times

August 23, 1897: “MR R. HUNTER of Los Angeles has been here since last Sunday, looking after his mining interests.  Hunter and A. L. Stewart, a capitalist, of Los Angeles, own the Grey Eagle group of mines on the edge of Randsburg.  Hunter and Prof. Inskeet of the Los Angeles Business College own the west extension of the Hard Cash mine, which prospects some.  When the weather becomes a little cooler they propose to get some men to work developing this mine.  Mr. Stewart has recently bonded the Bully Boy mine out in the Stringer district and is sinking a fifty-foot shaft.”  — Los Angeles Daily Times

October 03, 1898:  “After suspending operations for several weeks work on the Napoleon, Winnie and Bully Boy, in the Stringer district, work has been resumed, and some good ores are being taken out. Most of it is being milled at the Eureka mill. ” – The Herald

March 1900:  “The richest run made in the district for a long time was one made a few days ago at the Kinyon mill one a one and one-half ton lot from the Bully Boy claim in the Stringer district, which went over $400 to the ton.  This mill (mine) is being worked under a lease help my Messrs. Huff & Green.” –Corona Courier

June 18, 1904:  “NOTICE OF NON RESPONSIBILITYN filed by T. W. Atkinson as owner for Bully Boy, Hatchet, and Sunshine mines.  – Randsburg Miner

January 28, 1897: “A RICH STRIKE was made today on the Bully Boy, out toward the Stringer country and about one and a half miles from town.  This mine has always shown wonderfully rich ore but a very small vein.  In one place it had apparently pinched out, but on sinking deeper a vein of high grade ore several feet in thickness was reached.”  – Los Angeles Times

May 1897:  ‘THE CALIFORNIA RAND:  Listed in the Overland as one of the producing mines of the Rand District in March of 1897.  It was discovered May 16, 1896.  By March 1897 it had produced $7,000 out of a shaft 60 ft. deep.  The owners listed were A. Coultas, B.M. Atkinson.  – Overland Magazine

August 24, 1912: “JAMES RICE is hauling 23 tons of ore from his Lucky Boy claim in the Stringer district.  He will have a clean-up in a few days.”  — Randsburg Miner

1914: “ON APRIL 3, 1896O, Mr. Atkinson came with a partner and two burros to Randsburg, Kern County, with the intention of going into the mining business.  They prospered for a few months in what is now the Stringer district.  In this district they first located Poor Man’s mine, which is now operation and on June 30, 1896, located sunshine mine which they developed and which is now in a good state of production.  This mine has a stamp mill on it, and Mr. Atkinson also has a cyanide plant there.  He at present holds four claims having bought the Bully Boy and Rose mines, all now in production.”  – Wallace M. Morgan

June 29, 1923: “UNITED MINES ORDERS RESUMPTION OF WORK –Randsburg, June. 29.—The resumption of work on the United Mines, a gold property two miles southwest of Randsburg was ordered this morning and a crew of men placed at work getting things in shape for operations.  The United Mines is controlled by Bakersfield people and in the past has been one of the rich producers of the district, more than $125,000 having been taken from shallow workings.

Officers of the company are:  C. R. Hannaman, oil producer, Kern River field, president;  S. A. Miller, superintendent, Junction Oil Company, vice president; M. C. McVann, gauger, Union Oil Company, secretary:  H. E. Osborn, engineer Pacific Oil Company, Treasurer.

Neighboring properties, all of them gold, have produced their share of the precious metal and it is declared that a number of these rich producing veins cross the seven claims of the United Mines.”  Bakersfield Californian

September 10, 1923: “GOLD ORE WORTH A DOLLAR THE POUND REPORTED IN NEW RANDSBURG STRIKE –Gold ore carrying values exceeding one dollar per pound has been discovered on the property of the United Mines Incorporated, according to an announcement made by S. L. Pearce, consulting engineer, who is in active charge of operations.  The high-grade ore has been found in the stopes of three of the old shafts which were sunk many years ago, in the early days of the stringer district excitement, by leasers.

This latest discovery of rich gold ore will give a great impetus to mining and prospecting in the stringer district, it is believed, and will result in opening up a large number of old workings that have not been touched for many years.  Several leases already have been signed, it is reported, and a number of options are out for claims in that section.

Due to the fact that the old working shafts and stopes of the United Mines caved badly since the ore bodies were worked, it will be necessary for the present management to continue sinking in their main shaft, which is 300 feet away from the high-grade, until a depth is attainted which will permit them to come up under the gold-bearing veins.  This work will be consummated with the greatest haste, however, according to Engineer Pearce.  As the deepest of the old workings is only 120 feet, no great time should elapse before the extent and richness of the pay shoots will be definitely known.

“We will continue to sink our working shaft until we reach the 200-foot level,” said Pearce.  “At this point we will cut a station and drift on the vein matter until we are under the ore deposits now exposed in the old stopes.  We have what has been pronounced the best equipped plant in the district, and it will be our policy to develop the ore bodies we have discovered in the least possible time consistent with economical mining.

“We began work at the United Mines July 1, and since that time we have devoted our entire attention to locating the ore deposits which geology and legendary history told up were there.  But the richness of the discovery has far surpassed our expectations.

“Pioneers of the district claim that ore worth $3 a pound has been taken from the old workings.  From what I have seen in the last few days, I am inclined to believe the reports as being nearly correct.”

The majority of the shareholders in the United Mines Incorporated are oil men located in the Kern River and West Side fields.  Officers of the company are:  C. R. Hannaman, president; S. A. Miller, vice president; M. C. McVann, secretary; H. E. Osborn, treasurer.”—Bakersfield Californian

September 14, 1923:  “RICH ORE IS REPORTED BY MINERS –High grade gold ore worth as high at $2000 a ton, possibly more, was discovered last week on the old Bully Boy claim now operated by the United Incorporated which is a company made up of Kern river and west side oilfields men.

“These recent discoveries are so rich that they overshadow any made in this district for some years past.” said S. L. Pearce, the engineer in charge of operations at the mine.  The United Mines Incorporated will hasten development work and as soon as sufficient ore is blocked out a mill will be erected at the mine.

Tradition says that ore worth $3 a pound has been taken from the old workings.  The discovery last week was somewhat in the nature of a rediscovery as the Bully Boy had previously been worked by itinerant prospectors and $125,000 worth of ore taken from it.  The early workers of the mine had sunk three shafts.  A new impetus will undoubtedly be given to mining in the vicinity of the “fund” (sic).

C. R. Hannaman is president of the United Mines, the other officers being S. A. Miller, vice-president;   M. M. McVann, secretary, and H. E. Osborn, treasurer.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 6, 1924:  “The United Gold is cutting a station on its first level n the new shaft.  Sinking will resume Monday.—Bakersfield Californian

January 16, 1924: “UNITED MINES INC. PLANS OPERATIONS –Propose to Install New Mill at Property Near Randsburg—At a meeting of the board of directors of the United Mines, Inc., held here for the purpose of formulating plans for the operating of the company during the present year, M. D. Griffith, a prominent resident of Hollywood, was elected a member of the board of directors.

Griffith is a member of a pioneer family in the south, being a son of Colonel Griffith, donor to the city of Los Angeles of Griffith park, and well known in the south as a big game hunter.  He is also an expert mining man and assayer and his experience as such is considered a valuable addition to the board.

The board of directors is planning on a policy of greater expansion during the coming year and is negotiating for the acquisition of other property in the Rand district, and plans to commence the immediate construction of a Chilean slow speed roller mill with a capacity of 40 tons per day.

The company has been engaged in active development work for the past year, and while running a drift from the original shaft on the Bully Boy claim disclosed a quantity of free gold ore which assayed $2000 per ton.  Work is now being pushed on a second shaft for the purpose of facilitating the blocking out of the ore, pending the construction of the mill.

The present board of directors consists of C. R. Hannaman, Kern River oil operator: H. E. Osborn of Taft, S. A. Miller and M. J. McVan of Bakersfield and Mr. Griffith.—Bakersfield Californian

January 28, 1924: “The United Gold has resumed sinking from its new 100-foot level.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 5, 1924: “OVER AT THE UNITED GOLD, in the rich “stringer” part of the Rand, the shaft is now down 150 feet.  One of the company’s claims, the Bully Boy, was among the producing mines that called attention to this part of the desert back in the ‘90’s.  This property fully equipped with heavy first-class machinery, mining buildings, mess hall and sleeping quarters for their employees, carries a look of good management.”—Bakersfield Californian

MARCH 1925:  THE BULLY BOY PROPERTY, composing 7 claims totaling 110 acres, is located nearly two miles due south of Randsburg.  The property is operated by the United Mines Company, Inc.  The property is developed by four shafts and over 2,000 feet of old underground openings, most of which are inaccessible.  Of the shafts, two are old and inaccessible, one has recently been deepened to 100 feet, and the 4th vertical, is now down 70 feet and still sinking

Most of the work on the property has been done on a narrow vein which, though narrow, varied considerably in thickness and is said to have carried good values.  Much of the upper part of this vein was stoped years ago.  The vein strikes N. 65 degrees E., dipping 53 degrees N.

The claims held by the United Mines Company are credited with a past production of about $120,000 in gold.  . — Hulin.

YUCCA TREE (Santa Ana Group)

1962: “Located NE ¼ sec 11, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 2 miles south of Randsburg—Napoleon, Santa Ana, and Yucca Tree patented claims.  Total output of several thousand ounces of gold in 1897-1902 valued at $400,000 and 1905 -1918 and few hundred ounces at intermittent intervals between 1926 and 1942. Most of the gold obtained from Napoleon claim which is credited with an output of $100,000.  Very little gold credited to Yucca Tree claim.  Minor amount of lead obtained from concentrates shipped in 1937.  Tungsten output undetermined.  Developed by about 20 shafts from 50 to 150 feet deep and an undetermined amount of drifts. .”  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Divisions of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

December 30, 1896:  “CHARLIE KOEHN is taking some very rich ore from the Yucca mine out in the stringer district, and all that section is being prospected now very closely.” — Los Angeles Daily Times

January 3, 1897: “THE YUCCA TREE located and developed by Hammond, but afterward traded to Charlie Koehn for a stock of goods invoicing $4500 is one of the best producing mines here.  It is located almost due south of Randsburg and about three miles distant.  Work upon it is being pushed night and day, and some wonderfully rich rock is being taken out, many pieces showing free gold in clusters.  This ore is hauled to Koehn Springs for treatment.  Mr. Hammond has just completed the sale of another mine in the same vicinity to a Mr. Conway, the consideration being $1000.”  – Los Angeles Daily Times

January 20, 1897: “LOCATED JUST OVER THE HILL from the Bully Boy was the Yucca Tree owned by Koehn & O’Brien.  Not being worked at this time due to legal problems.”  — Los Angeles Times

January 24, 1897: “A PARTY CONSISTING OF G. W. Chrisman, Leon Cerf, James Daly, and E. E. S. Hall of Ventura, G. L. Chamberlain, Mr. Forbes and the writer (C. J. McDivitt) of Randsburg, started out southwest yesterday to see the mines. The first one visited, was the Mattie, Mr. Wilkinson the owner and three men were at work and had quite a pile of sacks on the dump. Next the Bully Boy was visited, but no one was at work, and no information could be obtained  Just over the hill the Yucca Tree was passed. Here a great deal of work has been done and much rich ore has been taken out.  It is now owned by Koehn and O’Brien and has a shaft down a hundred feet.  It is not now being worked on account of some legal troubles which are in process of adjustment. _ _ _ “– Los Angeles Times

February 24, 1897:  “MR. SAVAGE of San Jose, who bargained for the Winnie and Yucca Tree mines, is now here, and will remain for a week or so until all the arrangements are completed.  He visited the St. Elmo a day or two ago and is loud in his praise of that property, predicting that it will one day be worth millions.”  — Los Angeles Daily Times

May 1897:  “CALIFORNIA RAND” Listed in the Overland as one of the producing mines of the Rand District in March of 1897.  It was discovered February 26, 1896.  Shaft was 60 ft. Owners listed John Gilmore, Chris Matson, and Chas. Koehn.”  – Overland Magazine

January 1904: LOCATED in section 11, T30, R40 near Randsburg. Developed by 150-foot vertical shaft, 1000 feet of open cut and 500 feet of drift.  Owned by F. B. Layton of Los Angeles.”  — Aubrey

MERCED

SUMMARY;

1962: LOCATED IN SE ¼ sec. 11, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 2 miles south of Randsburg.  One patented claim.  The principal mining was in 1905-1908, 1910, -1912, and 1933- 1936.  Total gold output is several hundred ounces from ore that averaged ½ to 2/3 ounces per ton.  Tungsten output undetermined but probably a few hundred units. The mine was developed by 10 shafts on the south part of claim to maximum depth of at least 300 feet and a few thousand feet of horizontal workings.  Stopes extend to surface along large part of the stringers. There are lesser workings on north part of claim.  It has been mined by several lessees and small mining companies.  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Divisions of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

January 20, 1897: “LOCATED JUST BELOW THE Winnie, with rich stringers of the riches quartz running in many directions. Several leasers are at work and doing well.  At every shaft many tons of ore are sacked, waiting to be milled.  This is perhaps as rich as any section around Randsburg, but the veins of ore are small and particularly adapted to be worked by men of small means. Most of the leasers give one-fourth net to the owners, which as all mining men know, is a high rental.”  — Los Angeles Times

January 24, 1897: “A PARTY CONSISTING OF G. W. Chrisman, Leon Cerf, James Daly, and E. E. S. Hall of Ventura, G. L. Chamberlain, Mr. Forbes and the writer (C. J. McDivitt) of Randsburg, started out southwest yesterday to see the mines. The first one visited, was the Mattie, Mr. Wilkinson the owner and three men were at work and had quite a pile of sacks on the dump. Next the Bully Boy was visited, but no one was at work, and no information could be obtained.  Just over the hill the Yucca Tree was passed. Here a great deal of work has been done and much rich ore has been taken out.  It is now owned by Koehn and O’Brien and has a shaft down a hundred feet.  It is not now being worked on account of some legal troubles which are in process of adjustment.

A little beyond is the Winnie Mine, one of the best in the district.  This mine is also owned by Koehn and O’Brien, and here we found Mr. O’Brien superintending operations.  There is a shaft seventy feet deep on this mine and they are now drifting both ways.  The ore at the bottom goes $70 per ton while one place higher up in the shaft four tons of ore were taken out which milled $300.  Mr. O’Brien offered any of the party the privilege of going down into the mine and examining it if they wished.

Just below lies the Merced with stringer of the richest quartz running in many directions.  Upon this property several leasers are at work and all doing well.  At every shaft many tons of ore are sacked, waiting to be milled.  This is perhaps as rich as any section around Randsburg, but the veins of ore are small and particularly adapted to being worked by men of small means.  Most of the leasers give one-fourth net to the owners, which, as all mining men know is a high rental. _ _ _ “– Los Angeles Times

May 1897:  “THE CALIFORNIA RAND; Listed in the Overland as one of the producing mines of the Rand District in March of 1897.  It was discovered May 6, 1896. Shaft was down 60 feet.  Owners were listed as W. W. Green, A. M. Mugler, F. D. Stevens, and R. E. Stevens.  – Overland Magazine

September 11, 1897: “THIS MINE IS ANOTHER OF THE GOOD PROPERTIES in the Stringer district.  It lies a little to the east of the Magganetta, adjoins the Yucca Tree, the Santa Ana, and the Winnie, cornering on its sidelines.  It is owned by J. W. Scott, C. B. Scott, and H. W. Chase of Los Angeles, who purchase the property on the first of last March.  Two shafts have been sunk on it, both of which at the present time are down about one hundred feet, these shafts are separated from each other 128 feet, but are connected by a tunnel at the 50 foot level.  Another tunnel to connect them is being run on the 100 foot level.  No crosscutting has been done.  The ore in this mine has averaged about the same all the way down, and has all been rich enough to work.  It has been averaging from $30 to $40 a ton, although a sample lot of ten tons went as high as $140 to the ton.  J. N. Scott, who, besides being one of the owners, is also superintendent of the mine, is working two shifts a day, employing ten men.  The property is well equipped, having a hoisting whim, and all the other necessary outfit for advantageous working. The ore is sent to the Cuddebach Lake Mill and the concentrates are shipped.  Up to the first of the present month the value of the gold taken from this mine was $8438” — Los Angeles Daily Times

April 9, 1898: “Mr. Chase, proprietor of the Nadeau hotel, Los Angeles, accompanied by his wife, spent several days this week looking over the camp. Mr. Chase is part owner of the Merced mine and is not only pleased with the future prospects for that mine but predicts a bright future for the camp.”—The Herald

April 9, 1898:  “The stamps are now dropping  on a forty-ton run of Merced ore.” – The Herald

April 15, 1898: “THE MILL (Eureka) is now running on a forty-ton lot from the Merced. This is low grade ore and is not expected to go above $40 per ton.”  — Los Angeles Daily Times

April 16, 1898: THE MERCED MINE has just had a run of forty-one tons of second grade ore reduced at the Eureka mill, which cleaned up $1,250.”  — Californian

March 22, 1898: “MR. SCOTT OF THE MERCED in the Stringer district is having forty-four tons worked at the Eureka mill in Randsburg.  This ore will run about $70 to the ton. ” — Los Angeles Daily Times

May 27, 1898:  “THE STRINGER DISTRICT is now proving the richest part of the Rand Mining District, and no portion of it has produced better that the Napoleon, owned by Pridham, Munsons & Layton.  The main shaft is now down 170 feet, with richer rock at the bottom than ever.  In the whole distance the shaft has paid $70 per foot.  The ore is the most absolutely free milling ore in the district Times.

The Merced in the same district, and only a short distance to the southwest, has an almost equally good record, and it is again being worked.  The best miners in the district give it as their opinion that somewhere in the Stringer district will yet be struck the best and richest mine yet discovered.  The whole surface is seamed and crossed with small veins of rich quartz, carrying coarse gold, and there are undoubtedly offshoots from some larger vein as yet undiscovered. .”  — Los Angeles Daily.

October 3, 1903: “THE MERCED MINE, near Randsburg, has been incorporated, and R. L. Owens of Saticoy, Ventura County, is president.  The company will sink a shaft to open the Santa Ana Lead.”  – The Mining and Scientific Press.

May 1904:  LOCATED in section 2, T30, R40, near Randsburg. The mine is developed by an 80-foot vertical shaft, two inclines shafts of 180 and 185 feet, 100 feet of open cut, and 500 feet of drifts. It is owned by Merced Gold Mining Co. of Randsburg, R. W. McCloud superintendent.  – Aubrey

January 2, 1904: “THE SHAFT OF THE MERCED has been sunk to a depth of 83 feet, and we are informed that Superintendent McCloud has received instructions to sink it to a depth of 150 ft.”  — Randsburg Miner

March 26, 1904: “MR OWNES president of the Merced Mining Company spent several days in camp this week inspecting his company’s property.  Mr. Owens is well pleased with the prospects.  He returned to his home in Saticoy Thursday.”  -- Randsburg Miner

April 9, 1904: “MERCED MINING COMPANY will mill next week at the Atkinson Mill.”  -- Randsburg Miner

May 14, 1904: “BARNEY OSDICK has taken a contract to sink 20 feet in the deep shaft of the Merced G. M. company’s property in the stringer district.”  -- Randsburg Miner

June 25, 1904:  “THE MERCED MINING CO., operating in the stringer district, has let a contract to sink an additional 80 feet in their main shaft, it at present being down 180 feet.”  -- Randsburg Miner

June 27, 1907: “BARNEY OSTICK (Osdick) has just had a milling from the Merced mine of $800 worth of Tungsten.”  -- Randsburg Miner

April 23, 1915: “MERCED PROPERTY -Near the Sunshine, has acres of dumps showing considerable underground workings. It has been a steady customer of the Red Dog custom mill at Johannesburg, hauling the high grade and leaving that of lesser value on the dumps.  One of the mines that could contribute hundreds of thousands of tons of low grade ore for a modern custom or individual mill. ” – Randsburg Miner

MARVEL MINE

CHRONOLOGY:

January 20, 1897: “A MILE PAST THE MERCED and about three miles from Randsburg, is the Marvel mine, owned by Mathewson and Faust.  The principal shaft is forty- five feet and they are drifting on both sides.  There is a good ledge with ore that from tests run with a mortar and horn spoon, runs $100 a ton.  This mine has been worked for about two months, and they have 20 or more tons of ore sacked, not having yet milled any of it.”  — Los Angeles Times

January 24, 1897: “A PARTY CONSISTING OF G. W. Chrisman, Leon Cerf, James Daly, and E. E. S. Hall of Ventura, G. L. Chamberlain, Mr. Forbes and the writer (C. J. McDivitt) of Randsburg, started out southwest yesterday to see the mines. The first one visited, was the Mattie, Mr. Wilkinson the owner and three men were at work and had quite a pile of sacks on the dump. Next the Bully Boy was visited, but no one was at work, and no information could be obtained.  Just over the hill the Yucca Tree was passed. Here a great deal of work has been done and much rich ore has been taken out.  It is now owned by Koehn and O’Brien and has a shaft down a hundred feet.  It is not now being worked on account of some legal troubles which are in process of adjustment.

A little beyond is the Winnie Mine, one of the best in the district.  This mine is also owned by Koehn and O’Brien, and here we found Mr. O’Brien superintending operations.  There is a shaft seventy feet deep on this mine and they are now drifting both ways.  The ore at the bottom goes $70 per ton while one place higher up in the shaft four tons of ore were taken out which milled $300.  Mr. O’Brien offered any of the party the privilege of going down into the mine and examining it if they wished.

Just blow lies the Merced with stringer of the richest quartz running in many directions.  Upon this property several leasers are at work and all doing well.  At every shaft many tons of ore are sacked, waiting to be milled.  This is perhaps as rich as any section around Randsburg, but the veins of ore are small and particularly adapted to being worked by men of small means.  Most of the leasers give one-fourth net to the owners, which, as all mining men know is a high rental.

In this immediate vicinity there were perhaps a hundred men at work, a drive of a mile farther and about three miles from Randsburg, is the Marvel mine, owned by Mathewson and Faust, with Mr. Faust in charge. The principal shaft is forty- five feet and they are drifting on either side.  There is a good ledge with ore that from tests run with a mortar and horn spoon, runs $100 a ton.  This mine has been worked for about two months, and they have 20 or more tons of ore sacked, not having yet milled any of it.

Mr. Faust is a young man who was taking a college course at the Occidental College in Los Angeles, and during his vacation and during his vacation thought he would go out on the desert and do a little prospecting, with the luck of finding one of the best mines in the district.  Perhaps a professional career was spoiled, but a good miner might make up for the loss.

Around this mine is a group of five tents all occupied by men engaged in prospecting or developing something already found, and there are all together, at Camp Marvel, as the place is called, about sixteen men.

Beyond about a half mile, lived in a tent, H. E. Ellsworth, but he doesn’t anymore.  He now stops at Camp Marvel.  His story runs something like this.  A few days ago he was working about a hundred yards from his tent, almost on the surface of the ground, when on looking up; to his dismay he saw his tent on fire.  His first impulse was to run and try to extinguish it, but just then he remembered that he had some fifteen pounds of Giant powder, together with some caps, in the tent, so he threw himself on the ground to await developments.  He had not long to wait, and his tent was blown to atoms, and he lost everything he had in the way of clothing, cooking utensils, bedding and provisions to last a month.  Among his possessions were a couple of feather pillows and the boys say feathers came down for several days after.  Fortunately he was not injured, but such was the concussion that miners came from miles around to see what the matter was.”  — Los Angeles Times

February 16, 1897:  “MESSRS. MATHEWSON AND FAUST of the Marvel mine some three miles southwest of town, have had nine tons of ore milled at Harrison & Willard’s mill on Cuddeback Lake.  The ore was very rich, but they do not know yet just what it went per ton.  This was the first ore milled from that mine.”   – Los Angeles Daily Times

April 1, 1897: “SOME VERY RICH Strikes have been made recently, Angus Matheson in the Marvel mine, about three miles south of town, in the Stringer district, struck a very rich pocket of gold on Friday last.  Free gold is visible in all of it and some specimens seem to be half gold.  It is so far the richest rock found in the mine, and the equal of any found in the district.  He has taken nine sacks of it, which he estimates will go $100 to the sack. The vein is small and in saving it some outside matter necessarily is taken with it, or it would go much higher.”   — Los Angeles Daily Times

April 28, 1897: “ANGUS MATHIESON, of the Marvel mine has just milled eight tons of ore at the mill at Mesquite Springs with a return of $100 per ton.”  — Los Angeles Daily Times

September 25, 1897:  “MESSRS, FAUST & MATHESON, owners of the Marvel mine, adjoining the Magganetta in the Stringer district at Randsburg, have ordered an extra 100 feet added to their present shaft of 60 feet.  A late mint return placed $2000 to the credit of the owners.” – Corona Courier

September 30, 1899: “FORFEITURE NOTICE –To W. H. Faust, and all  others who may claim an interest in the Marvel Mine, you and each of you are hereby notified that we have expended during the year, 1898, one hundred (100) dollars in labor and improvements on the above quartz mine, located in the Rand mining district, County of Kern,  State of California, which location certificate is found of record in the Rand mining district records, in book 4, page 83, above county and state, and recorded November 12, 1896, in order to hold said claim under the  provisions of section 2324 of the revised statutes of the United States and the amendments thereto approved January 22, 1880, concerning the annual labor upon quartz claims, being the amount required to hold said claim for the period ending December 31, 1898.  And if within ninety (90) days from the personal services of this of this notice, or within ninety (90) days after the publication thereof, you fail or refuse to contribute your portion of such expenditure as a co-owner, your interest in the said claim will become the property of the subscribers,  your co-owners who have made the required expenditure by the terns of said section.

Dated this 29th day of July 1899.

Charlie Koehn

Ed Hammond, Jr.

Randsburg Miner

September 8, 1900: “GOLDSMITH AND ROBB on the Marvel mine have cleaned out the shaft and are making preparations to take ore exposed in the bottom.”  — Randsburg Times

STANDARD CLAIM

CHRONOLGY

January 28, 1897:  “IT IS ALSO REPORTED TODAY  on good authority that Mr. Harper of the firm of Harper and Reynolds, Los Angeles, had purchased the Standard Mine adjoining the Kengar (sic) on the west and South and covering quite a portion of the town of Randsburg.  The consideration was $12,000” — Los Angeles Times.

March 1899: “HARLEY KERNSH arrived in camp in May, 1895, less than a month after the first discovery of gold by Burcham, Singleton and Mooers.  He immediately made some valuable locations, many of which he still owns, among them the Trilby Extension, and the Standard, the latter of which is on the northern edge of the town, and near the Kinyon and Little Butte mines. There has been some very rich ore found on it very recently, and it is liable to become very valuable.  He located the Wedge mine in April, 1896, on which he had a shaft 65 feet, at which depth some very rich ore was found, some of it going as high as $300 to the ton.  He sold it to J. W. Rodgers, and it is well known that it has since produced over $100,000.  He is also the owner of the Golden Bow mine, near the Yellow Aster Company’s mine, which is liable to prove very valuable”  – McPherson.

June 6, 1900:  “NOTICE OF ASSESSOR’S SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY—to satisfy the taxes on the possessory interest in and to the Standard Mining Claim and the improvements thereon amounting to  $16.65”  — Randsburg Miner

.March 15, 1913:  “THE STANDARD CLAIM, adjoining the Good Hope on the West, has been leased by James Rice.  This property is owned by F. H. Morgan of Redlands.  The big ledge of high-grade ore, which was encountered on the Good Hope, runs east and west and has been traced to the Standard.  The sinking of a shaft has been started back of the Episcopal Church and a crosscut will be driven on the ledge with greater depth.”  — Randsburg Miner

THE ANNEX

SUMMARY:

1962: THE MINE IS LOCATED in sec. 4, T30S, R40W, MDM, Rand dist., 2 miles west of Randsburg, Reported to have 186 feet of shaft and 500 feet of drifts.  No record of production between 1899 and 1962.  –Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

December 31, 1897: “B. McGINNIS AND S. J. MONTGOMERY have struck a good ledge on the Annex and they are now down eighteen feet on a fine ledge that mills $47 per ton.  The Annex is a wedge lying between the Nancy Hawks and Big Horse and this vein is the same as that recently opened on those claims.  It is a good strong ledge and bids fair to make a mine.”  – Daily Californian

June 19, 1900:  “The little 3 stamp mill of Parker’s is pounding away day and night and giving good satisfaction.  Just now they are at work on a 50 ton lot from the Annex mine for Messrs. Montgomery and McGinnis.”  — Randsburg Miner

September 15, 1900: “MONTGOMERY AND SHIPSEY are having forth tons of ore from the Annex milled at the Red Dog mill.  It is of medium grade. “Randsburg Miner

November 17, 1900:  “NOTICE OF NON RESPONSIBILITY for expenses of Annex quartz claim filed by E. B. McGinnis.”  — Randsburg Miner

November 17, 1900: “THE ANNEX as far as can be judged from the amount of work done, promises well for the owners, Mr. S. J. Montgomery and Barney McGinnis.  Two shafts have been sunk on the property, one down 165 feet, and the other about 100 feet.  A tunnel of 100 feet in length connects the two shafts.  Development work is being carried on at present.  The ore milled from the mine shows up well.  About $10,000 has been taken out of the mine to date.”  — Randsburg Miner

January 1904: LOCATED in section 4, T30, R40, near Randsburg, Developed by 186 foot incline shaft and 500 feet of drifts.  Owned by Montgomery & McGinnis of Randsburg.  — Aubrey

TIPTOP MINE

September 14, 1912:  “FOR THE LAST SIXTY DAYS the Tiptop Mining Company, of Buena Vista, has shipped about twenty tons of ore daily, averaging $26 a ton in value.  Three four-horse teams have been loading every day.  Manager Thorndyke’s has not had over five miners at work at any one time

The mine has 1,100 feed of underground development in the levels. Shipping ore has broken from a vein several feet wide.  The ore body on the main level is 29 feet wide; of which eight feet is shipping grade.  The owners, C. Thorndike, who is the manager, and D. McMillan, of Laws, estimate that over a million tons of ore is blocked on two sides.

When Thorndyke took hold of the property there was only a burro between it and the railroad.  He built a wagon road and in sixty days paid this expense and placed a handsome balance to his credit in the Owens Valley Bank, and all this from a mine that has been repeatedly turned down by some of the most eminent mining men of the country. . “– Randsburg Miner

BANNER MINE

SUMMARY:

1962: REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN at sec. 33, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand dist., 1 ½ miles west of Randsburg.  The prospect was developed by 25 foot shaft, 25 foot incline shaft, and 50 foot incline shaft, 100 feet of open cuts, 500 foot of tunnel (crosscuts?) and 50 feet of drifts.”  — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology.

CHRONOLOGY:

October 15, 1897:  “A VERY PROMISING STRIKE was made on the Banner Mine a few days ago, the ore body being of an extent as yet unknown, as no walls have been found.  The ore looks very promising and assays so far are said to run from $150 to $1,100 per ton.  The claim is owned by Messrs. Price & Hopper, Hubbell & Pauly and Martin, and development work to determine the extent and value of the find is now being prosecuted.”  – Daily Californian

1904: REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN at sec. 33, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand dist., 1 ½ miles west of Randsburg.  The mine was developed by 25 foot shaft, 25 foot incline shaft, and 50 foot incline shaft, 100 feet of open cuts, 500 foot of tunnel (crosscuts?) and 50 feet of drifts.  Owned by J. R. Price of Randsburg.”  Aubrey

BELLADONA

September 13, 1897:  “J. H. UNDERHILL bought the Belladonna mine form J. D. McCormick and Clyde Kuffel this week for $500.  The claim lays out on the Kramer road this side of the Black Hawk and is a fine prospect.  A ledge two and a half feet has been discovered on it that horns well throughout and there is about eight inches of it that is very rich, every piece taken out showing free gold.  The work of developing the ledge will be taken up immediately, and all indication point to the opening of a mine.”  — Daily Californian

BURCHAM # 1

April 16, 1898: “GLENNIE AND HARRIS have taken up a lease on a portion of Burcham #1, and have already discovered a good twenty inch ledge that promises to pay them handsomely.  The ledge horns well the entire length and on the foot wall there is a pay streak three inches wide that runs from $300 to $500 per ton.”  — Daily Californian

June 1898: MILLING CHARGES for ore from the Burcham #1 Claim, this was apparently leased to Fisher and Griggs in 1898. The lease did not however appear to be a paying proposition as their return on 62 Tons was only $39.00. – Collection of Rand Desert Museum

BURCHAM # 2

October 7, 1899: “A HUNDRED FOOT CONTRACT—Joe Boone and Jake McKinney have  the contract for sinking the first one hundred feet on the Burcham No. 2.  They start to work Monday.  The company proposes sinking four-hundred feet.” –Randsburg Miner

J.H.L MINE

October 21, 1897:  “J. R. LLOYD, the saloon man here, has an old-time breech-loading shotgun, which was found by him in the old J. H. L. mine.  The gun is a single barrel affair of the Zulu type and one of the first breech loading shotguns made.  Lloyd dug the gun out of the old shaft.  It is quite a relic and is believed have been the property of a former owner of the J. H. L. mine, during the olden days when Randsburg was but a mining camp.  The owner of the gun disappeared and was never heard from again.”  — Randsburg Miner

JAUNITA

April 9, 1898: “JOHANNESBURG, April B.—At the Johannesburg reduction works this week clean-ups have been made of King Solomon, Hector and Juanlta ore. The Hector ore was quite rich; a ten-ton lot of the Juanlta ore going about $20 per ton.” – The Herald

1902;  THE MINE WAS DEVELOPED BY 212 foot shaft, 40 foot of drifts,  and it was owned by J. L. Crowell.” Register of Mines and Minerals, San Bernardino County, 1902. (Editors note: This is the claim upon which the big silver strike was made which became the famous California Rand Silver Company or Kelly Mine.  See San Bernardino Mines for further information. JBP)

DEFENDER

CHRONOLOGY

September 15, 1896:  :DEFENDER MINED (quartz) – This is one of the new discoveries in the Mojave Desert, ¾ mile East of Randsburg, at 4,550’ altitude.  A strong rich vein of rich quartz is exposed in an open cut.  E. B. Maginnes (sic) et al, of Randsburg, owners.”  California State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of the State Mineralogist for the Two Years Ending September 15, 1896.

January 30, 1900:   ”The Defender has men at work on a crosscut from the 100-root level. C. A. Burcham or Los Angeles paid $2,000 for a one-third interest. The daily stage from Mojave to Randsburg is crowded with passengers both ways. A good portion of the travel is to the Panamint country.” — Los Angeles Herald

November 3, 1900: “NOTICE OF NON RESPONSIBILITY issued by C. A. Burcham for the Defender, Little Bonanza, and Single Standard quartz claims.”  — Randsburg Miner

DOS PICANNINI MINE

September 15, 1896:  “DOS PICANNINI (quartz) – It is in Fiddler’s Gulch, 1 mile East of Randsburg, at 3,400’ elevation.  The development consists of a shaft 40’ deep, following the vein on a 40 degree slope.  It is an extension of the Maria and on the same vein.  Benson Bros et al, of Randsburg, owners. ” California State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of The State Mineralogist for The Two Years Ending September 15, 1896.

MARIA

September 15, 1896:  “MARIA MINE (quartz) – It is in Fiddler’s Gulch, 1 mile E. of Randsburg, at 3,400 elevation.  It is a new discovery on a 10” to 24” quartz vein, dipping to 40 degrees S.  The incline shaft is 40’ deep.  Benson Bros. Et al Randsburg, owners. ” California State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of The State Mineralogist for The Two Years Ending September 15, 1896.

.

REPUBLIC

September 15, 1896:  “REPUBLIC MINE (quartz) – It is 2 ½ miles S.E. of Randsburg, at 3150’ altitude.  It is a new discovery on the same vein as the Hawkeye.  P. O. Fifield, of Randsburg, owner. . ” California State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of The State Mineralogist for The Two Years Ending September 15, 1896.

RUSTLER AND SAN DIEGO (quartz)

CHRONOLOGY

September 15, 1896:  RUSTLER AND SAN DIEGO MINES (quartz).  They lie ¾ miles E. of Randsburg, at 4650’ elevation.  They are new locations on the vein of the Olympus which they adjoin.  A 60’ tunnel is run into a mass or vein of gold bearing quartz.  E. B. Maginnis et al, of Randsburg, owners. State Mining Bureau, Thirteenth Report of The State Mineralogist for The Two Years Ending September 15, 1896.

January 30, 1900: “The Rustler group of six claims is showing good ore. One shaft has been sunk over 100 feet, and it is thought the ore is on the same ledge as the Yellow Astor.” — Los Angeles Herald

PLACER GOLD MINING COMPANY

SUMMARY;

1962: A COMPANY THAT RECOVERED PLACER GOLD and sheelite from alluvial material in vicinity of Baltic mine.  Dry placer method of recovery utilized 1898-1913, sluicing methods used about 1916.  Production probably attributed to claims from which material was removed. – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

December 1, 1911: “TUNGSTEN AND GOLD MINING—Work at Placers Near Randsburg Progressing Nicely.—The work at the placer grounds between here and Atolia is progressing satisfactorily.  One machine is in active operation and produces good results.  The concentrates are rich and carry good values in gold and tungsten.  Another machine is on the way and will soon be set up.

E. A. Stevens, of the International Manufacturing & Mining Company, is in charge of the work and cheerfully demonstrates the working of the machine.  Mr. Stevens has arranged to make test runs of several properties to demonstrate the value of his process of extraction.  He has discovered that the grayish black sand found abundantly in this placer ground is an iron formation, carrying very good values in gold.  This and was formerly considered worthless and disregarded.  The amount of tungsten recovered is considerable and the fact that the machine handles both gold and tungsten successfully is a matter of congratulations to the company.  The apparent success of this enterprise means a great deal for many properties in this vicinity which could not be worked particularly by ordinary methods.  The future work of the International Company will be followed with much interest. Randsburg Miner”—Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 12, 1912: “GEO. W. GORDON of Portland Oregon one of the directors of the International Manufacturing and Mining Co., is here in the interest of his company.  This company has been demonstrating their dry washing machine on the placer grounds around Atolia.  The machine has been moved to the Baltic property recently.”—Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 11, 1912:  “J. R. METCALF of Los Angeles, secretary of the Placer Gold Mining Company, is In Randsburg -to superintend the completion of the concentrator, which has been installed on the company’s placer grounds near the Baltic. These placer mines with extensive gravel beds, rich in both sold and tungsten, have been acquired by this corporation from Sidney Coburn. Colonel E. Dunham, proprietor of the King Edward hotel in Los Angeles, Is the president of the Placer Gold Mining Company, and E. Coppock, another Los Angeles capitalist, vice president. Much material and additional machinery has been hauled to the grounds and it is reported that the plant will be ready for a run in a few days.”  — San Francisco Call

August 24, 1912: “AN ENTIRELY NEW PLANT of much larger capacity has been installed by the Placer Gold Mining Company on the Baltic grounds, one of the 18 claims owned by this company.  Operations have been started at once.

This Rube Goldberg Contraption Is Believed To Be the First Dredge To Operate In The Rand Mining District. Collection of Rand Desert Museum

This company will be one of the first to use electric power. About 45 to 60 horsepower will be required to operate the plant.  Water for sluicing purposed is furnished both by the Randsburg Water Company and the Santa Fe railroad.  The pipeline of the Sunshine Mine has been connected with, and it is through this pipe-line that the water hauled in tank cars is pumped from the Santa Fe depot in Johannesburg.”  -- Randsburg Miner

October 22, 1912: “GOLD MINING AT RANDSBURG –Eight men are usually employed in the operation of the plant of the Placer Gold Company in the stringer district.  A sand pump has been installed to remove the slime and sand which accumulated in the settling tanks.  An amalgamating barrel was set up for treating the large amount of concentrate which has been collected.

The operators of this plant had expected to remodel it a long time ago but the iron works in Los Angeles are crowded with orders and unable to fill them on time.  Sluice boxes of steel, five in number, each 22 feet long and equipped with a double wall, will supplant the wooden sluice boxes now in use, and the wooden percolating tank will be removed and three steel tanks put in its place.  The concentrating tables, equipped with cocoa matting will be torn out replaced with three steel tables. This change of equipment will save both water and labor.  Sidney Coburn of Los Angeles will remain here until the plant has been completed.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 1, 1912: “PLACER GOLD COMPANY TESTS—The test runs at the plant of the Placer Gold Company, a little south of Randsburg met with so much success that it was decided to enlarge the plant and to begin concentrating of the gravels on a large scale.  Six-foot steel sluice boxes will be installed and the elevators enlarged to handle the increased tonnage.

The Placer Gold Company owns three contiguous, claims, the White Horse, Fairchild, and Marguerita, all situated in the Rand Mining District.  The gold and scheelite bearing gravels of these claims have a depth of 9 to 22 feet from surface to bedrock.  It has been demonstrated that the gold values alone more than pay for the operating expenses.  The scheelite contained in these gravels is a tungsten ore of high purity and is  found is all sizes from a pure white sand to pieces three pounds in weight.  Owing to the high specific gravity of the scheelite, it settles on the riffles of thee sluice boxes with the gold.  It is __ually separated from the latter

Col. E. Dunham of Los Angeles is president of the company and F. Cappook, secretary.  Sidney Coburn the energetic promoter of the company has been fortunate in the choice of his superintendent, Harmon Wynn.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 15, 1912:  “PLACER CO. ERECTING RESERVOIR FOR DUMPING—Cummings Separator Is Installed to Separate Gold and Sheelite.—Randsburg, Dec. 14.—A reservoir 90×60 feet in size, has been built by the Placer Gold Company south of their plant during the past week, which will be used as a dumping ground for the tailings from the sluice boxes.

Two elevators, 80 feet in height have been erected, which will move the tailings from the plant into steel sluice boxes, 150 feet in length.  Another pump has been installed at the settling tanks to pump water into the tailings sluices.  The tailings are flushed into the reservoir, from where the water is drained back into the settling tanks.

A Cummings separator has been installed to separate the gold, scheelite, and black sand.  An analysis of the black and is worth from $45 to $65 per ton in gold alone.

Development work was commenced this week at the placer grounds southeast of the plant of the Placer Gold Company.  These grounds comprise the Grey Eagle, One Track, Two Track, and Jersey Lily placer claims.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 16, 1912: “ACTIVITY IN PLACER WORK – A reservoir 90×60 feet in size has been built by the Placer Gold Company south of their plant during the past week, which will be used as a dumping ground for the tailings from the sluice boxes.

Two elevator’s thirty feet in height have been erected, which will raise the tailings from the plant into steel sluice boxes 150 feet in length.  Another pump has been installed at the settling tanks to pump water into the tailings sluices.  The tailings are flushed into the reservoir, from where the water is drained back into the settling tanks.

A Cummings separator has been installed to separate the gold, scheelite, and black sand.    An analysis of the black sand brought to light the fact that this sand is worth from $45 to $65 per ton in gold alone. The plant of the Placer Gold Company, will be ready for steady operation in the near future.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 24, 1912:  “PLACER GOLD COMPANY –Many improvements for the more economical handling of gravel and tailings have been installed lately at the plant of the Placer Gold Company, located one mile south of Randsburg.

B.  Coppock of Los Angeles, secretary, was here inspecting the plant of the company.

Many are interested in the outcome of this venture which so radically departs from the customary procedure of concentrator.  If crowned with success this mode of gold extracting will be conducive to revolutionizing completely in this district the methods n usage in placer Mining.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 28, 1912:  “HARMON R. WYNN TO SIDNEY COBURN –$20 White Horse, Lode Claim, Rand District.

Harmon R. Wynn to Sidney Coburn, $10; Fairchild Lode, the Marguerita Lode, both in Rand District.

Chas. A. Phelps, to Placer Gold Company; $10 the White Horse Fairchild, and Marguerita claims.’ –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 5, 1913: “PLACER GOLD COMPANY—The plant of the Placer Gold Company has been enlarged and equipped with many time and labor saving devices.  A Cummings separator was installed last week and the tailings sluice box has been completed.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 12, 1913:  “PLACER GOLD’S NEW MILL – Gravel rapid reduction mill is being installed on the grounds of the Placer Gold Company.

The Mill will be used to pulverize the concentrates, so the sheelite may be separated from the gold by the Cummings concentrator recently installed.  The Braun rapid reduction mill has a capacity of three tons in ten hours and requires only three horsepower.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 12, 1913:  “THE PLANT OF THE PLACER GOLD COMPANY has been enlarged considerably during the last month and equipped with many time and labor .saving devices. Preparations are finished for continuous- operations, the results of which are being watched with interest by many owners of similar placer properties in this district.”  – San Francisco Call

January 13, 1913:  ‘PLACER GOLD COMPANYE. Coppock, of Los Angeles, Secretary of the Placer Gold Company, arrived here Monday in company with Oscar C. Beach, representative of the Braun Corporation of Los Angeles.  Mr. Beach is installing a Braun rapid reduction mill on the grounds of the Placer Gold Company.

This mill will be used to pulverize the concentrates so the scheelite can be separated from the gold by the Cummings concentrator, recently installed.  The Braun rapid reduction mill has a capacity of three tons in ten hours and requires only three horse-power.

The recent unexpected cold spell has retarded operations at the plant of the Placer Gold Company to some extent, but a continuous run is looked for in the near future” –Bakersfield Californian

January 26, 1913:  “ELECTRIC POWER FOR PLACER GOLD MINE –Places Order With Southern Sierras Co.; Mining New of Rand District.—Randsburg, Jan. 26. –Electric power will be used in the operation of the large plant of the Placer Gold Company, which owns extensive placer grounds one mile and a half south of Randsburg.  The contract for electric power was signed this week between Placer Gold Company and the Southern Sierras Power Company.

The trial runs undertaken at the plant of the Placer Gold Company have established the feasibility of this process of gold extraction and proved the success of the undertaking.  The pipe line of the company connecting with the pumping plant at the Johannesburg railroad station has been repaired.  The electric motors for the elevators and pumps of the sluicing plant are on the way and the distillate engines will be taken out and supplanted by electric motors as soon as the power is available from the substation.”  –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 27, 1913: “ELECTRIC POWER FOR PLACER GOLD –Electric power will be used in the operation of the large plant of the Placer Gold Company, who owns extensive placer grounds in the Rand district, one mile and a half south of Randsburg.  The contract for electric power was signed this week at Los Angeles between the Placer Gold Company and the Southern Sierras Power Company, whose power line runs past these placer grounds.

The trial runs undertaken at the plant of the Placer Gold Company have established the feasibility of this process of gold extraction and proved the success of the undertaking.  The pipe line of this company connecting with the pumping plant at the Johannesburg railroad station has been repaired.  The recent cold weather caused only slight damage to this pipe line.

The electric motors for the elevators and pumps of the sluicing plant are on the way and the distillate engines will be taken as soon as the power is available from the sub-station of the Southern Sierras Power Company.

Col. Dunham, of Los Angeles, president of the Placer Gold Company and B. Cloppock, secretary, are expected hear next week on a tour of inspection in company with a number of Los Angeles capitalists who are interested in the company.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 4, 1913:  “THE CLAIMS OF THE PLACER GOLD COMPANY will be exploited by Sidney Coburn of Los Angeles.  A plant for handling the ore operated by electricity with be erected.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 9, 1913:  “COLONEL E. DUNHAM, owner of the King Edward Hotel in Los Angeles arrived here last night.  Colonel Dunham is financially interested in the Placer Gold Company.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 6, 1913:  “AT A MEETING OF THE DIRECTORS of the Placer Gold Company held at Los Angeles, an assessment of two cents a share was levied to raise sufficient funds to equip its plant, two miles south of Randsburg with electric power.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 3, 1914:  “J. E. I. Paugh has sold his mining claims in the Stringer district to the Placer Gold Company.  He also accepted a position, with that company.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 6, 1914:  “PLACER GOLD COMPANY—The new dredger elevator of the Placer Gold Company is working as smooth as possible.  The power to the machine and pumps is supplied by variable speed electric motors.  At a working trial the machine handled 315 yards of pay dirt in eight hours.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

September 26, 1914:  “MACHINERY –MINING GAME, AND ESPECIALLY PLACER WORK, BOOMING AT RANDSBURG –Showing the way the mining business is booming at Randsburg.  C. D. Crain, superintendent of the Placer Gold Company there contemplates installing new and more powerful machinery in the near future, some of the machinery now being shipped from Los Angeles.  Crain states that best results can be obtained by increasing the output of which at present they are handicapped by the lack of water and the small amount of gravel that stacker conveys, as this necessitates running the large elevator at less than its regular speed.

The peculiarities of this placer district is the distribution of scheelite and gold in the placer gravels.  Where tested to bed rock, about 75 feet at this particular point the gravel is placed at $3 to $4 per cubic yard, about $2 in scheelite, a high grade tungsten mineral and the rest in gold.

The method used by the Placer Gold Company to obtain the scheelite and the gold, and to separate them, consists of raising the gravel by a 35-foot elevator into a steel sluice box flume 100 feet in length, with a depression or grade of one and a half in the foot.  The steel flume is sixteen inches high with riffles two and a half inches deep.

The product goes through a revolving screen and that which passed through the screen is run over 200 square feet of steel tables covered with cocoa matting and Brussels carpet.  The tailings are hoisted by elevator to another sluice box and the water that goes through the sluice flume is repumped to wash the tailings to the dump.

The clean-up of the sluice boxes is put through a pulverizer in a 24-inch mesh and run over a separator.  From the separator the portion of gold and tungsten not separated is put into amalgamator barrels.

That the placer activity, now merely in its inception will greatly augment the revenues derived from the mines of the district in the prediction of all competent judges.  The placer fields of the district extend out to Red Mountain and south to Atolia.” –Bakersfield Californian

AJAX

CHRONOLOGY

August 24, 1912:  “D. HANDY, AMBROSE, AND EUNOCH HALLFORD, who recently secured a lease on the Ajax mine, located east of town, had a milling of eight tons from this property last Thursday, which resulted in a clean-up of $960, or $120 per ton.  Most of the ore was taken from the surface to a depth of 20 feet.  The shaft is now down 30 feet with a big body of ore in sight.  The Ajax is the property of F. B Hathaway, of Colton and has produced many of tons of high grade ore in the past.”  — Randsburg Miner

July 4, 1914: “NOTICE OF NON RESPONSIBILITY—To whom it may concern:  I will not be responsible for any labor performed or for any materials purchased on the Ajax Lode Mining Claim situated in Kern County, California.  F. B. Hathaway.”  -- Randsburg Miner

CORONA

March 1899: “ORRIN OSBORNE, still owns the largest part of the Corona, located in the Stringer district, which he is now working at a profit, having recently milled nearly fifty tons of ore, most of which ran over a hundred dollars.”  – McPherson

January 16, 1900: The Corona has struck a 12-inch ledge that gives $200 to the ton. ” – Los Angeles Herald

ARGUS BUTTE

May 11, 1901: “WORK IS TO BE RESUMED on the Argus Butte mine near Randsburg owned by John Rosenfelt Sons, of San Francisco, G. Lewis superintendent.  There is a mill on the mine, but the ore is refractory and has been sent to a smelter, but the cost of transportation is heavy.”  -- Mining and Scientific Press

YELLOW POPPY

May 4, 1901: “THE YELLOW POPPY AND GREY EAGLE have two shafts down 106 and 160 feet.  The vein is 12 feet wide and said to average $4 a ton. .”  -- Mining and Scientific Press

ALLSTATE PROPECT

1962: THE PROSPECT IS REPORTED TO BE IN sec. 32, T11N, R12W, MDM, Rand dist., 2 ½ miles southwest of Randsburg, on northwest side of Rand Mts.  Two claims.  Formerly Raven and No. 1 owned by T. B. Peterson.  Developed by several prospect shafts and admits.  D.P. Shorey and W. T. Johnson listed as owners in 1957.´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

AMERICA (AMERICAN) GROUP

SUMMARY:

1962: MINE IS REPORTED TO BE in sec 36, T26S, R32E, MDM, (1904) NOT CONFIRMED, 1957. Formerly three claims –Blue Bird, Yellow Jacket, and U. S. Ore shoots near the surface yielded a few thousand dollars in gold by 1910.  It is now probably part of the Snowbird Claim. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

January 1904: “THE AMERICAN GROUP was reported to be in Section 26, T29, and R40. Near Randsburg, Developed by a 300 ft. incline shaft with 700 feet of drifts, it was owned by Jefford Brothers of Randsburg.   The mine consisted of Blue Bird, Yellow Jacket and U. S. claims.  – Aubrey

April 16, 1904: “MESSERS. WILLIAMS AND HAGLIN operating on the U. S. claim in the Stringer district has a milling this week at Snow’s.”  Randsburg Miner

ARIZONA

1962:  THE ARIZONA WAS Located at NW. corner sec. 17, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand Dist.  4 ½ miles southwest of Randsburg, on northwest slope of Rand Mts.  Two inclined shafts of undetermined depth about 40 feet apart are connected by near surface stope.  In 1916, one shaft was 60 feet deep and 20 tons of ore from it contained $1,520 in gold.  Several tens of ounces of gold were produced 1918-1921 from ore that contained from 1 oz. to 4 oz. gold per ton.  Property now included in Sidewinder group. . — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

BARNETT GROUP

1962: LOCATION IS SW sec. 16, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand district, 4 miles south of Randsburg on Rand Mts. Several claims and privately owned land.  Developed by several open cuts, trenches, shallow shafts, and short adits.  Total output undetermined but probably small.  Active in 1930’s and 1940’s. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

BIG DIKE (BIG DYKE)

1962;  THE LOCATION OF THE MINE IS  NW ¼ NW1/4 sec. 1, T.30S, R.40E., M.D.M. Rand district, half a mile south of the east end of Randsburg, about 100 yards west of the paved road in Fiddlers Gulch.  Ownership in 1962 was J. D. O’Shea estate, Benko brothers, Portage, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. M. O. Miller, Los Angeles (1958)

The total output of gold from the Big Dike mine is probably several thousand ounces, valued at about $200,000.  Most of the gold was produced between 1929 and 1950.  The average gold content of about 10,000 tons of ore was slightly less than half an ounce per ton.  The gold averages about 930 fine.  Some production of ore from the Big Dike mine may have been credited to the Yellow Aster Mining Company’s production during its operation of the mine sometime before the mid-1930s. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

BOBBY PROSPECT

1962:  REPORTED TO BE LOCATED at NW1/4SE1/4 sec. 3, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand dist., 1 ½ miles southwest of Randsburg near crest of north flank of Government Peak.  Consists of two claims; formerly Old Glory No. 1 and No. 2.  Developed by several shallow shafts, pits, and short adits, and a crosscuts adit (caved) several tens of feet long. The mine was credited with small production. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CULBERT (JOSPHINE, T.G.)

1962: LOCATED at NE corner of sec. 10, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand District, 1 ¾ miles southwest of Randsburg in center of small valley south of Government Peak.  Fifteen claims.  Principal workings are several hundred feet of drifts extended on several levels from an inclined shaft of at least 400 feet deep. Some near surface stopes near shaft and several other shafts of undetermined depth.  Several adits and narrow surface stopes to southwest of main vein. Mine was an early discovery in the Rand district but production was probably not greater than several hundred ounces of gold.  Most of the ore mined 1901-1905, 1910-15, and 1929-38.  Other periods of small production; most recent was 1951. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

ELIZABETH PROSPECT

1962:  LOCATED at approximately the center east half of sec. 4, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand District, 2 miles southwest of Randsburg, on northwest side of Rand Mts.  Owned by ___Patterson in 1925. It is developed by several inclined shafts and prospect holes. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

GOLD CROWN (GOLD KING)

SUMMARY

1962: LOCATED at NW ¼ sec. 12, NE ¼ sec. 11, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 2 miles south of Randsburg.  Three patented claims.  Stringers are developed by shafts to a depth of at least 100 feet, and numerous open cuts.  Talc or soapstone is exposed in open cuts. Undetermined production of gold and scheelite. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY

November 20, 1917: “The Gold Crown Consolidated mine has good gold and tungsten prospects. H. W. Manby, the owner, has opened up milling scheelite ore at a depth of 50 feet.” – Bakersfield Californian

November 20, 1917: “W. R. MANBY of Randsburg is the author of a review of the mining industry of Randsburg and Atolia, in the Mining and Oil Bulletin just off the press.” — Bakersfield Californian

GOOD LUCK

1962: REPORTED TO BE LOCATED in sec. 1, T30S, R40E, MDM, vicinity of Randsburg. Developed by 105 ft. vertical shaft and 30 foot cut, with 30 feet of drifts.  It was owned by J. R. Parker in 1904. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

GRANTON (ALFRED) MINE / READY CASH

1962: LOCATED AT SE cor. Sec. 4, T30S, R40E, MDM, 2 ¼ miles southwest of Randsburg, on northwest side of the Rand Mountains.  Principal mining activity in 1930’s at which time a mill was operated on the property.  Previous names of the mine are undetermined.  Developed by several inclined shafts, drifts, and adits at crest of a small hill. .´ — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

GUNDERSON GROUP (KING GEORGE, MINNESOTA)

SUMMARY

1962:  LOCATED at the approximate center of N ½ NW ¼ section 10, T30S, R40E, MDM, 2 miles southwest of Randsburg, at west end of small valley south of Government Peak.  Five claims.  Mine workings consist of 2 main inclined shafts on southwest part of vein and other shafts farther northeast.  Also a 44 foot west driven drift adit, with winze at west end of drift, lies between the two main shafts.  Winze connects with drifts of undetermined extent between shafts.  Depth of shafts undetermined but 3 shafts were at least 100 feet deep in 1916.  Probable total output a few hundred ounces of gold mined mostly in 1919-1920 and 1945-1948.  Other intermittent mining occurred between 1905 and 1940.  — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY

December 31, 1897:  “J. A. McCUSKER, who recently bought the King George, Mohawk, and Climax claims, has uncovered a three-foot vein on the King George, which he can trace through the three claims, and now has ten or twelve men at work.  The rock mills $48 and sufficient evidence of a good mine has caused Mr. McCosker to build a boarding house and go at the work of development in a permanent manner.”  – Daily Californian

March 5, 1924: “Bob Gunderson, owner of the Minnesota group of claims, and Emil and Fred T. Culbert, owners of the Josephine group, have agreed to work together and bring in a good gold producing property.  They have a gas hoist in, plenty of steel, and powder, besides the grub and everything that a bunch of hard rocks require to go ahead.

Gunderson, in prospecting this particular part of the Minnesota holdings, one of the oldest in the “stringer” portion of the Rand gold zone, put down the prospect shafts within a distance of 100 feet, all showing the vein two feet in place.  In doing this work he milled $2800.

The Culbert brothers have a well proved property.  One of their development shows a wall that cannot be equaled in the entire district with ore that would pay if a mill was on the ground.  They believe it will improve with development.

There are many shallow shafts and adits on both the groups, that have made handsome returns, but like the early-day mining, when they hit the sulphides or breaks they tried another promising site.

Without any question, a geologist that is interested in his calling would find this particular part of the gold fields a study for many days.  Adits, generally called, and known as tunnels on a hillside, have produced many thousands of dollars.  When the pickings quit, it was decided to run a long tunnel.  Under the best pay a 300-foot tunnel brought no results.  A 150-run-in as a crosscut, found ore but not in place.  Float can be found on any part of the hill.

Hundreds of claims in the “stringer” show shallow workings that have paid and paid good but no developing followed after the ore ceased.  It is hoped that in the joining of interests and hitting the drills will bring the results of the trio’s good judgment.”—Bakersfield Californian

HERCULES (MINERS DREAM)

1962:  LOCATED AT THE NE corner, sec. 2, T30S, R40E, MDM, in Fiddlers Gulch, ½ mile southeast of Randsburg Post Office. – Principal veins mined through two shafts about 300 feet apart which are connected with several hundred feet of drifts and stopes on vertical vein.  It was mined mostly in 1930’s by lessees. . — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

LA CROSSE

SUMMARY:

1962: “THE LA CROSSE WAS LOCATED AT NE ¼ sec. 11, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 1 ¾ miles southeast of Randsburg, southeast slope of Rand Mountain. – One claim.  It was developed by several shafts from 20 to about 100 feet deep and about 400 feet of drifts.  Its output was several hundred ounces of gold in 1909 from ore that contained about 3 ¼ ounces of gold per ton with minor production in 1937. — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

March 22, 1898: “JOHNSON AND A PARTNER have ten tons from the La Crosse now being hauled to the Eureka mill.  This ore is exceptionally rich, and may run $200 or more.  Free gold is visible in much of it.”  Los Angeles Daily Times

September 23, 1898: “THE EUREKA MILL at Randsburg crushed four tons of ore from La Crosse mine in the Stringer district last week which went over $150 per ton.  That mill also crushed tons of ore from the Napoleon, which averaged $100 per ton.”  – Los Angeles Daily Times

July 11, 1903: “JENSON & HOFFMAN are working on the LaCrosse claim, adjoining the Sunshine mine, near Randsburg, say the Minor.  They have sunk a shaft 130 feet and are crosscutting.”  – The Mining and Scientific Press

August 29, 1903: “WIGGINS & SHORT are taking $90 ore out of the La Crosse claim.”  — The Mining and Scientific Press

May 21, 1904:  “T. W. HOFFMAN informs us that he has relinquished his lease on the La Crosse.”  — Randsburg Minor

June 18, 1904:  “NOTICE OF NON RESPONSIBILITY filed by H. P. Jensen as owner, for expenses of La Crosse.”  — Randsburg Miner

January 1904:  MINE IS LOCATED in section 2, T30, R40 near Randsburg.  In 1904 it was an unpatented claim developed by three vertical shafts of 60 to 140 feet, two incline shafts of 80 and 85 feet, 200 feet of open cut and 400 feet of drift.  It was owned by Jensen and Jewett of Randsburg.” Aubrey

January 23, 1904:  MESSERS PETRAY, HOFFMAN AND FORD are doing development work on the LaCrosse.  They are sinking a 70-ft. winze.”  — Randsburg Miner

August 2, 1913:  “NOTICE OF NON-RESPONSIBILITY—To Whom It May Concern—I will not be responsible for labor or material used in or on the Lacrosse quartz mine, situated in Rand Mining District, Kern County, Cal.  Sept 18, ’07.  O. B. Stanton” – Randsburg Miner

ARCHER E. LASS

1962: THE ARCHER E. LASS WAS LOCATED in Sec. 33, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand district, 2 miles west of Randsburg. The mine was reported in 1904 as having one 40-foot shaft, 50 feet of cuts, and 30 feet of drifts.  Owners were Bouchard and Hansen.” – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

MABLE S. / MABEL S.

CHRONOLOGY:

July 11, 1903: “L. D. DAVES AND J. J. NOSSER have a lease on the Mabel S. mine, near Randsburg.  They have a 14 inch ledge which assays $30.  They are sinking on the ledge.  The claim adjoins the Yellow Aster on the west.”  — The Mining and Scientific Press

January 1904: ” THE MABLE S. is a patented mine, developed by 70 foot vertical shaft and 150 foot cut. It is owned by C. Asher of Randsburg.”  — Aubrey

MASCOT PROSPECT

1962:  THIS CLAIM, which was owned by the Glen Olive Mfg. Co in 1904, is reported to be five miles south of Randsburg.  It was owned by G. M. Humphrey in 1916 and it was developed by a 50 foot shaft.  The ore was milled at Red Dog mill in Johannesburg. Troxel and Morton believe that it may now be part of the Sidewinder prospect.” – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

MASTER KEY GROUP

1962: LOCATED IN THE  N ½ sec. 1, T30S, R40E, MDM, of the  Rand district  1 mile southeast of Randsburg, Developed by 4 shafts,  Two shafts are 25 feet deep, two are 50 feet deep.  A drift 60 feet in length connects the two 50-foot shafts.  Production reported to be $4,000 or $5,000 in gold.” – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

MONARCH RAND (MONARCH TUNGSTEN GOLD MINING CO.)

SUMMARY:

1962: “THE MONARCH RAND GROUP is located in SE1/4 sec, 1, T30S, R40E, MDM.  It is approximately 60 acres of patented land. Development consists of vertical shafts from 200 to 600 feet deep with about 500 feet of drifts appended at several levels.  Deep shafts were developed in search for silver ore.  Few hundred ounces of gold and undetermined amount of scheelite were produced in 1930’s and early 1940’s from placer material.”  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

Mineral Survey No.5851, Visalia Land District, Surveyed October 8, 1925, known as Monarch Rand, Monarch Rand No. 1, Monarch Rand No. 2 and Overland, owned by Monarch Rand Mining Company, improvements consisting of 5 shafts, 1 shaft, and drifts, 1 incline, 1 incline and drifts, 1 cut and 1 cut and incline, valued at $24,739.  Patented August 24, 1927

August 15, 1924:  “MONARCH RAND MINES REPORTED TO START SOON. Funds from the last assessment are reported as coming in fast and freely and that it is expected in a very short time, sufficient will be in the treasury to pay up, and then to begin the work a new and push  it vigorously.

The Monarch Rand Company has 1500 acres of ground and when developed this will make money for all concerned is the view or mining men who know the property.

The entire Rand district is anxious to see this company make good and it has at its head some very capable men who are certain at some time to make a success of this big property.

There are many men whom the company owes accrued wages who will also be pleased to hear of the new move to improve, for they have sadly needed their accumulated and unpaid earnings, which are now promised to be paid soon.

May the Monarch Rand “come back” stronger, better and more virile than ever!

News of the greatest importance is contained in the fact that early this week the directors of the Monarch Rand Mining Company held a meeting in Tulare and took up the matters of the mining development falling to their lot, and voted to levy an assessment of 12 per cent on the stock and go on with the work of making their property into a big mine.

Directors and stockholders were present from Visalia, Tulare, Lindsay, and that vicinity, and they met with S. O. Waker, one of the large holders and decided to levy this assessment, pay their indebtedness of last spring, and commence work as soon as the money had been raised and the debts of the company liquidated.”  — Randsburg Times

March 1925: “THE ORIGINAL WORKINGS of the Monarch Rand Mining Company were approximately 1600 feet southeast of the Baltic Shaft.  The Monarch Rand-Shaft, now known as the Monarch No. 1, is a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft, now 450 feet deep.  It is planned to sing to 700 feet.  Stations have been cut at 118, 168, and 218 feet.  One vein, 3 ½ feet thick, has been found in this shaft which was said to assay $48.00 chiefly in gold.  This vein which lies on the hanging wall of a quartz latite dike was cut off on top, bottom and both ends by faults.  100 tons of ore were taken from the No. 1 shaft.

The Monarch Rand Mining Company have recently acquired the Baltic claim, including the old mine and mill, and also the property formerly known as the Ben Hur Extension.

It is understood that a working agreement has been reached whereby the Monarch-Rand property will be explored by a crosscut driven from the 300-foot level of the Garford Lease Shaft.”  — Hulin

OLD BALDY PROSPECT

1962: THIS PROSPECDT WAS LOCATED IN NW ¼ sec. 1. T30S, R40E, MDM, of the Rand district, 1 ¼ miles southeast of Randsburg.  It has a vertical shaft of undetermined depth.  There was probably no production when it was worked in the 1930’s.  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

ORPHAN GIRL

SUMMARY:

1962: LOCATED IN THE NW ¼ sec. 12, T30S, R40E. MDM, Stringer district, 2 miles southeast of Randsburg.  Discovered in 1896 and mined mostly in 1905-1906, 1911, 1928-29, and 1934-1935.  Principal output was in 1911.  Total output is few hundred ounces of gold from ore the averaged about 0.4 oz. gold per ton.  Orphan girl vein is developed by a 370-foot inclined shaft with drifts totaling 500 feet on 3 levels.   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

August 29, 1903:  “E. HAMMOND AND S. OAKLEY are down 140 feet on the Orphan Girl and are now drifting on the 130-foot level.”  — The Mining and Scientific Press

November 20, 1917:  “The Orphan Girl recently installed a gasoline hoist and is sinking a shaft on a scheelite vein.” – Bakersfield Californian

PEARL WEDGE (VICTORY WEDGE)

SUMMARY:

1962:  LOCATED IN NE ¼ sec. 11, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 2 miles south of Randsburg.  A small fraction between Merced and Santa Ana claims.  There are three shafts to depths of 250 feet and probably a few hundred feet of drifts on several levels.  The total output t of the mine was a few hundred ounces of gold in 1909-1910 and 1936-37. The amount of tungsten output is undetermined. .  – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

CHRONOLOGY:

August 29, 1903:  “THE PEARL WEDGE, owned by Balschweid & Pierce although not very large is quite rich.  Ore taken from it runs $100 to the ton.  There are a number of men at work on it.”  The Mining and Scientific Press

September 26, 1903: “PEARL WEDGE—Ore from this mine at Randsburg has yielded returns of $91 per ton.”  – Engineering and Mining Journal

January 16, 1904: “THE PEARL WEDGE milled 6 tons of ore at the Atkinson mill last week.”  — Randsburg Miner

April 1904: “THE PEARL WEDGE is milling 26 tons this week at Snow’s Mill.’  — Randsburg Miner

May 14, 1904: “RICH ORE IN PEARL WEDGE.–Messrs. Balsch, Weid and Pierce cleaned up $1400 from 20 tons of ore at Snow Mill this week.  They are taking out good ore.”  — Randsburg Miner

January 1904: “THE PEARL WEDGE was developed by 225 foot incline shaft and 145 feet of drift. It is owned by Balsh, Weid, & Pierce of Randsburg.  — Aubrey

1914: “HE (Carlos Grant Illingworth) also owns the Pearl Wedge mine.”  -- Wallace

PESTLE GROUP

1962:  THIS GROUP OF CLAIMS ARE LOCATED IN THE NW part of sec. 4, T30S, R40E, MDM, Rand district, 2 miles west-southwest of Randsburg, northwest slope of Rand Mts. Claims were owned by Sam Mingus of Randsburg. There were approximately 8 claims, developed by exploration shafts and drifts, with probably no production. .   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

PYRAMID

SUMMARY

1962: THIS CLAIM of P. J. Osdick’s was reported in several locations within a few miles of Johannesburg May be in San Bernardino County. .   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY

July 11, 1897: “C. W. CONWAY, formerly of Louisville, Kentucky, owns three claims in the Stringer district.  They are the Lucky Star, Pyramid, and the March.  They are situated just north of the Magganetta and west of the Winnie.  Some ore from the Lucky Star is reported to have milled as high as $130 to the ton.  Mr. Conway intends pushing development work on his properties as, from the mill tests made, he is satisfied that they will yield him good returns.”  – Los Angeles Daily Times

September 19, 1903: “THE PYRAMID MINE is being developed by the Verification & Development Co., 4 miles south of Randsburg.

January 1904:  “PYRAMID MINE was reported to be located in section 15, T29, R40.  It was developed by a 120 vertical shaft, a 50 foot incline shaft and 95 feet of drift.  The reported owner was C. C. Bowles of Randsburg.”  – Aubrey

RATTLESNAKE

1962:  THE RATTLESNAKE was reported to be in the Rand district, about 1 mile south of Johannesburg in 1910, somewhere in the vicinity of Wade H. group.   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

September 25, 1897:  “A PIECE OF ORE WEIGHING MORE THAN 1000 POUNDS was knocked down in the Rattlesnake mine, near the Red Mountain, last Tuesday, and the boys had a nice time sledging and gadding it into pieces of a suitable size to hoist.  A drift was being started at a depth of 27 feet where the big piece was knocked down.  The roc goes about $40 per ton, and the prospect looks well. –Randsburg Miner.” –Corona Courier

RED BIRD MINE

1962: THE RED BIRD IS LOCATED IN THE SE ¼, T30S, R40E, MDM, 1 ¾ miles southeast of Randsburg in the Stringer district, adjoining the south boundary of the Baltic.  It is developed by 135 foot vertical shaft at east end of claim and 500-foot inclined shaft 500 feet to the west. Shafts are connected by drift at 135-foot level.  Small amount of scheelite has been recovered from placer material and sorted material from dump at vertical shaft.  Several tens of ounces of gold were produced in 1930’s. .   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1.

RIZZ NO. 2 (GOLDEN EAGLE)

SUMMARY:

1962:  THE RIZZ NO. 2 is located in the NW ¼ sec. 12, T30S, R40E, MDM, Stringer district, 1 ½ miles south of Randsburg.  Formerly Golden Eagle claim and may be same as Orphan Girl.  It is developed by inclined shaft to an undetermined depth.  It was owned in 1957 by W. C. Wilkenson and Americo Rizzardini.   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY: June 7, 1957: “RIDGECREST — Max Rizzardini and Bill Wilkerson were in Ridgecrest last Sunday with samples of gold bonanza quartz struck at a depth of 15 feet on Wilkerson’s claim adjoining the old Sunshine Mine at Randsburg in the Stringer District.

Last Saturday they had decided to put in a finishing round and quit the claim unless some sign of ore was found. When they shoveled out the muck they found a glittering vein of quartz six inches in width and five feet long.

Pannings from both hanging and footwalls show bonanza quality while the quartz has gold specks glimmering all over it. “If it gets much better it will be in a class with picture rock,” they said.

Both men, old-time miners and prominent retired businessmen of the desert area, are loath to put in any more rounds. They fear the beautiful rock may pinch out in the same sudden way it appeared. As things stand they are potential millionaires and have agreed to thing things over for two weeks before putting in another round. It is too nice a feeling to be trifled with.” – San Bernardino Sun

ROSE M. CLAIM

1962:  LOCATED IN THE SW ¼ sec. 2, T30S, R40E, MDM of the Rand district.  It is a fractional claim south of Nancy Hawks claim.  It has a shallow vertical shaft. .   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

RUBY MINE

SUMMARY:

1962:  THE RUBY MINE IS Reported to be in sec. 23, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand district by Aubrey in 1904.  There are twelve shafts 20 feet to 150 feet deep, and 600 feet of drifts. .   – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

March 1899: “Col.” (HAFFORD) AS HE IS KNOWN TO HIS FRIENDS, arrived in camp in the latter part of 1896, and opened a saloon which he conducted until the big fire of May 1898, by which he lost his building and stock.  He immediately rebuilt on the same ground and has since been doing well.  He is an owner in the Ruby mine, which is bonded at present to Chas. A. Koehn, out of which he is taking some very rich ore.  He is also interested in many other good mines in the district, and some of them are sure to turn out well.”  — McPherson

March 1899: “CHAS A. KOEHN—At present he is working the Ruby group, which are paying well.”  – McPherson

March 1899: V. VAN BRIESEN– He also has interests in good mines in the Rand mining district.  Among them he owns two-thirds of the Ruby min, which is at present bonded to Chas. A. Koehn, from which is being taken some high grade ore.”  — McPherson

January 1902: “LOCATED in section 23, T20, R40.  Development consisted of twelve vertical shafts from 20 to 150 feet deep and 800 feet of drifts.  The reported owner in 1904 was J. I. Roberts of Randsburg.  –Aubrey

March 12, 1904: “MESSERS. ROBERTS AND MATHEWS will commence milling from the Ruby next week.”  — Randsburg Miner.

March 19, 1904:  MESSERS ROBERTS AND MATHEWS milled 10 tons or ore this week at the Red Dog which went $17 a ton.  They will have another milling next week.”  — Randsburg Miner

March 26, 1904:  “MESSERS. ROBERTS AND MATHEWS operating on the Ruby will mill next week at the Red Dog.”  — Randsburg Miner

SIDEWINDER (Double Thirteen Prospect)

1962:  LOCATED IN NW1/4 sec. 18, T30S, R40E, Rand District, 5 miles southwest of Randsburg on northwest flank of Rand Mts. Ten claims.  Inclined shaft a few tens of feet deep and minor amounts of drifts on gold-bearing vein.  Scheelite –bearing stingers exposed in a few shallow pits.  Few ounces of gold recovered during early part of 1958. — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

SNOWBIRD

1962: LOCATED IN NE1/4 sec. 26, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand District, 1 mile north of Randsburg.  Three claims.  East fault zone developed by 2 inclined shafts 500 feet apart north and south, a south-driven drift-adit about 100 feet north of the south inclined shaft, and a vertical shaft about 100 feet east of the south inclined shaft .  Two inclined shafts of undetermined depth and 55 feet apart on western fault zone.  Probably some production but not recorded under present mine name. — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

SPOKANE

1962: REPORTED IN 1904 to be in Sec. 33, T29S, R40E, MDM, Rand district. West of Randsburg, Owners were Wm. Bouchard and Hansen or Randsburg.   The claim was reported to have one 30 foot shaft and one 50 foot tunnel.  Identical information reported in 1904 by Aubrey. – Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

TAM O’SHANTER

1962: IN 1904 A MINE by the name of the Tam O’Shanter was reported to be located in sec. 13, T30S, R40E, MDM, in the Stringer District south of Randsburg,  This mine was reported to have two incline shafts 65 feet deep, a 20 foot open cut, and 150 foot of drifts. — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

UP TO DATE

SUMMARY:

1962:   IN 1904 A Mr. C. C. BOWLES reported that he had a mine by this name located in sec. 10, T30S, R40E, MDM, southwest of Randsburg.  The mine was developed by a 10 foot vertical shaft, 10-foot and 15-foot inclined shafts and a 50-foot open cut. — Mines and Minerals of Kern County California, California Division of Mines and Geology, County Report 1

CHRONOLOGY:

January 1904: Ditto above development data, Owned by C. C. Bowles.  — Aubrey

INDIANAPOLIS, BULLY BINDER, JOSEPHINE

September 30, 1899: “FORFEITURE NOTICE –To Reuben E. Stevens, Robert Dorsey, John Doe.

You are hereby notified that we have expended for the years 1897 and 1898, one hundred (100) dollars each year in labor and improvements upon each of the following described claims, situated in the Rand mining district, County of Kern, State of California:  The Indianapolis mine located August 20th 1896 and recorded in volume 3 page 59 Sept. 19, 1896.  The Bully Binder mine located August 20, 1896 and recorded volume 3 page 59,  Sept. 21, 1896: The Red Cloud Mine located Oct. 10 1896 and recorded in book 4 page 82, Nov. 4, 1896: The Josephine mine located December 30th, 1895 and recorded in book 1, page 24, all in the records of the Rand Mining District.  Said expenditures being the amounts required by the United States mining laws under the provisions of section 2324 of the revised statues of the United States and amendments thereto concerning annual labor upon mining claims, being the amount required to hold said claims for the years ending December 31, 1897 and December 31, 1898.  And within ninety (90) days form (sic) the date of final publication hereof, you fail, or refuse to contribute your portion of such expenditure as a co-owner your interest in the said claims shall become the property of  the subscribers, your co-owners, who have made the required expenditure according to the terms of said section.

The assessment work on the Red Cloud and Josephine is only for the year 1898.

Dated this 24th day of June 1899, Randsburg, California

Gus Binder

James Montgomery

Randsburg Miner

LITTLE BONANZA

November 11, 1899:  “MR. JOHN A. GOWEN has let a contract to Ed Shipsey to sink a double compartment shaft 100 feet deep on the Little Bonanza claim.  The Defender and the Little Bonanza claims adjoin the Yellow Aster Company’s property on the east.  The Little Bonanza adjoins the side line of the Burcham and it is thought the extension of the Trilby ledge has been struck, as a vein of forty feet or more which all assays from eight to ten dollars has been found.  Mr. Gowan will go down 500 feet or more and thoroughly test what the ground contains.  Mr. Gowan will go down 500 feet or more and thoroughly test what the ground contains.  Mr. Gowan bonded a two-thirds interest in these mines from Peter Hanson and Jerry O’Leary some time ago.  Mr. Ed Maginnis selling his third interest to L. A. Burcham.” –Randsburg Miner

GOLDEN KING UNITED

August 8, 1922: “A visit to the holdings of the Golden King United Mining Co. group of claims, located near the Sunshine, a famous gold producer in the days of the “stringer district” shows a scene of activity, mining, setting up of machinery and a number of buildings.  Timber men have just set up the head frame over the 50-foot shaft; foundations in concrete are ready for the hoist, a Chicago pneumatic and other machinery.  With nothing to delay of interfere, the resumption of sinking will be under way within two weeks,  This shaft shows ore all the way down with good values, always showing $40 per ton, a high class milling proposition.

This group of four claims is in the very heart of the many workings that poured hundreds of dollars in the yellow metal on the owners, miners, and dry washers, and about a quarter of a mile from the Yellow Aster domain and two miles from Randsburg over the paved highway.

Within two weeks the Golden King will have all the looks of a regularly running mine, with the machinery in action, blacksmith and machine shop completed and several reservoir tanks in place, and both sleeping and dining quarters occupied.  The sleeping quarters are not of the “bunk house” pattern but large single rooms with sleeping porches.

The kitchen is about all a cook could desire, being equipped with everything new and running water aplenty.  The dining room, like all the buildings, has a high ceiling, well ventilated, with a long porch running the full length of the building.  The room will easily seat 40.  Right at the kitchen door is an 80-foot tunnel that has been enlarged, making it an ideal place for fruits, vegetables and stores –a saving in many dollars in ice alone.

Adjoining the Golden King is the Eclipse Co.’s. Group consisting of three claims.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

September 2, 1922:  “COMPLETE MACHINERY has been installed on the Golden King United, near the celebrated Sunshine Mine.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

September 27, 1922:  “THE GOLDEN KING UNITED, of two claims of 40 acres each, had been sunk to a depth of 74 feet.  At this point it is reported the miners struck a 10 inch streak.  Just above this, according to Carroll, was a three-foot ledge.  Further mining developed that the 10 inch streak has widened to two feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 18, 1922:  “MINING PARTNERS GO INTO COURT –Answer Is Filed in Action to Force Financial Accounting.  H. B. Martin and B. M. Atkinson filed an answer to County Clerk F. W. Smith’s office today to and action brought by George A. Hill to recover sums alleged to be due from a partnership arrangement with the defendants, who are said to be owners of the Golden King United mining properties located in the Randsburg district.

According to the bill of complaint filed by Hill, he entered into an arrangement with Martin and Atkinson whereby he was to share profits of the mining venture on a 50-50 basis.  Hill has been unable to get any accounting from the defendants, it is averred, and seeks judgment of the court.

In the answer filed today all the allegations of the plaintiff are denied by Martin and Atkinson, and a counter charge is filed in which Hill is accused of fraud and misrepresentation through which he was for a short time employed by Martin at a salary of $300 a month.  It is averred that Hill represented himself to be an expert mining engineer, and to have served in that capacity in South Africa, when Cecil Rhoades was developing mining interests there.

Martin also charges Hill with having converted various supplies and goods from the commissary department at the mines, and with having used material and labor in the building of a home for himself.  Martin alleges that he did not discover Hill’s identity until September 10, when he ordered Hill to leave the property, and at that time it is alleged, a complete settlement with Hill was executed.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 18, 1922:  “CHANGE OF VENUE ASKED BY MARTIN IN MINING TRIAL — A motion to appoint a receiver for the Golden King United mines association, and also or a change of place of trial in an action brought against M. B. Martin, B. M. Atkinson, et. Al., in connection with mining properties near Randsburg, will be argues before Judge J. W. Mahon, in superior court No. 1, on Thursday of Friday, December 21 or 22.  An order to than effect was made today by Judge Mahon, following notice given by Attorney John Mulligan, counsel for Martin, that we present a motion for trial in Los Angeles County.

Acton was brought against Martin and Atkinson some time ago by C. R. Hannaman, J. McVan and B. F. Cooper, representing as association of stockholders in mining  properties said to have been marketed by Martin.” –Bakersfield Californian

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