RED MOUNTAIN OTHER MINES AND CLAIMS PART 2

Survey number:      Owner:      Date of discovery:

While it is the intention of the Rand Desert Museum to have each claim posted in to the CLAIMS portion of each town this may not happen for some time while the mechanics of the Claims section are worked out.  In the mean time we are posting that information here so that is available to you.  When we get the CLAIMS portion of the web site up and working it will be much easier to conduct a search of a specific claim or claim owner. Thank you for your patience.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–        RAND VENTURE MINES

Rand Venture Mining Co. Prospectus. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

The only reference to the Rand Venture Mines found so far besides the Stock Prospectus is an entry in the Southern Sierra’s Power Company report from 1922 on the mines of the Rand District.  This report states that the business address for the company is Los Angeles, that the President of the company was E. M. Benedict and that the Secretary was F. R. Corwin.  Representing the company locally was L. F. S. Holland, Engineer.  They had several claims including the Overlook Group, the Big Jim 1 and 2; Lyle 3 and 4.

Rand Venture Mining Co. Claim Map. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum.

They had now power to the mine and no equipment on site.  The workings consisted of a 60 ft. shaft on Overlook #2

JULIUS SCHADE

March 1925: “THIS PROERTY CONSISTS of a lease on seven and a fraction claims located approximately a mine north of Randsburg.  A number of old workings exist on the property to which some new has been added.  These include an incline shaft along a vein which strikes N. 10 degrees E., dipping 65 degrees E., and some drifting along the vein. Another shaft of low inclination has been sunk on another vein further east and a certain amount of drifting carried on.  The vein consists wholly of iron stained schist practically free from vein quartz.  Nor ore had been discovered up to the time of the writer’s visit, although the property is credited with small production a number of years ago. The property is equipped with a light 10 stamp mill recently erected.  The writer understands that this mill is now operating on ore discovered since his visit.” --Hulin

RED DYKE

October 6, 1921: “RICH MINING CLAIMS IN THE RAND DISTRICT ARE PURCHASED HERE –One of the most important mining deals reported from the Randsburg district in some time was the announcement today that H. I. Tupman, Charles Bloemer and W. G. McIntyre had acquired a considerable area of land adjoining the famous Rand Silver incorporated.  The property purchased comprises the Red Dyke claim and three others, all so situated in the producing area that they should be big paying properties when developed.

The Red Dyke Claim is but 700 feet from the new strike on the Silver Moon and is located directly between the Hicks strike and the Rand Silver incorporated.

It is the intention of the new owners of the claims to acquire other properties and to start development work along intensive lines at an early date.”  -- Bakersfield Californian

KELLY RAND EXTENSION

CHRONOLGY

Kelly Rand Extension Stock Certificate. (Formerly Known As the Brey Bisbee). Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

December 23, 1921: “KELLY RAND EXTENSION TO START OPERATIONS AT ONCE – Cas Walser and Everett King Head New Randsburg Mining Concern –Development of another big mine is indicated in the announcement of the Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company which has been capitalized at $300,000 with $200,000 worth of stock authorized for sale.

It is the intention of the incorporators to start development work at once on its Red Dyke clam which adjoins the Californian Rand Silver Incorporated, and the location of the shaft has been selected on engineer’s advice to be about 1200 feet from the main shaft of the California Rand.

Prominent Men Lead –The board of directors of the Kelly Rand Extension Company are all well-known bankers, property owners and business men of Bakersfield and Kern County.  Cas Walser is president; Everett King, vice-president; Felix Gaites, of the National Bank of Bakersfield, is treasurer; A. C. Tupman is secretary, and with C. W. Bloemer, prominent oil and land operator, make up the board of directors.  The officers are very optimistic over the prospects for developing a big producing mine.

Commissioner of Corporations Bellows has advised the company of the granting of its incorporation permit and executive offices for the concern have been opened on the fourth floor of the Hopkins building, where the details of stock transactions will be carried out.

Considerable interest is attached to the beginning of operations by the Kelly Rand Extension Company, due not only to its proximity to the biggest silver producer in the Rand District, but also due to the fact that the granting of the permit to sell stock means immediate development of one of the best prospects in the field.  Besides the Red Dyke claim, the company owns the Red Gulch, the Red Gulch No. 1, the Red Gulch No. 2 which group lies near the development of the North Rand Silver Mining Company.  All properties of the company are free from incumbrances (sic) and all matters as to titles have been passed by competent authorities.

The officials of the company have had some very excellent photographs taken of the town of Randsburg, the district in general and the property of the Kelly Rand Extension, showing the workings of the California Rand Silver, Incorporated and the Gallagher shaft, which also is in close proximity to the new company’s property.  The photographs are on display at the company’s office on the fourth floor of the Hopkins building. –Bakersfield Californian

January 7, 1922:  “BIG DEMAND FOR EXTENSION STOCK – Kelly Rand Company Has New Offices in the Hopkins Building—-Demand for stock in the Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company is growing with the announcement that the company has received its permit from the corporation department. The company has opened offices on the fourth floor of the Hopkins building, where Charles Bloemer and William McIntyre are attending to the issuance of stock.

It is the intention of the incorporators to start development work at once on its Red Dyke claim which adjoins the California Rand Silver, Incorporated, and the location of the shaft has been selected on engineer’s advice to be about 1200 feet from the main shaft of the California Rand.

The board of directors of the Kelly Rand Extension Company are all well-known bankers, property owners and business men of Bakersfield and Kern County.  Cas Walser is president; Everett King, vice-president; Felix Gaites, of the National Bank of Bakersfield, is treasurer; A. C. Tupman is secretary, and with C. W. Bloemer, prominent oil and land operator, make up the board of directors.  The officers are very optimistic over the prospects for developing a big producing mine.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 30, 1922: “KELLY EXTENSION STARTS NEW SHAFT –Citizens Battle Snow to Be Present at Ceremony for Big Mine – Eight prominent business and professional men of Bakersfield yesterday battled snows and the worst storm of years to motor to Randsburg to watch the first shovelful of dirt turned which will in all probability mean a second mine in that locality to compete with the famous California Rand Silver Incorporated. Ground was broken yesterday for the shaft of the Kelly Rand Extension Mining company and those who made the trip to witness the work were Charles Bloemer, Dr. George Buchner, Samuel Brice, W. S. Buchner, William Bain , Tod Mosler, A. N. Massey and Ira Williams. The shaft of the new mine is located not more than 1200 feet distant from the famous California Rand Silver Incorporated property and is one of the best prospects for a future wonderful producer that the Rand district has to present at the present time.

Kelly Rand Extension Mine. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Company Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley's Family

The work of hauling lumber to the new mine site was temporarily stopped yesterday by a snowstorm which is being handled from the company’s offices on the fourth floor of the Hopkins building in Bakersfield.  The Gallagher mine, located not more than 200 feet from the shaft of the Kelly Extension, is said to have struck rich ore and the fact that the California Rand Silver Incorporated has paid nearly a million in dividends has interested may local people in the sale of the stock of the Kelly Extension company.’ – Bakersfield Californian

January 31, 1922: “Ed Herkelrath is having the brush burnt off, the Kelly Rand Extension for the big event of breaking ground for their standard shaft on the Red Dyke claims.’ –Bakersfield Californian

February 6, 1922: “OUT OF TOWN ORDERS FOR KELLY RAND STOCK—San Francisco, Los Angeles, Fresno, as well as a good many of the smaller towns are sending in orders for shares of stock in the Kelly Rand Extension Mining company.  A big block of stock was secured by people living in and around Taft and Fellows.  The company reports a demand for stock was created by actually starting development.  Permission was granted by the commissioner’s office to issue certificates and now all stock certificates are available and being sent out.  The company has secured offices in Randsburg and it is stated operations and development will be rushed.” – Bakersfield Californian

February 21, 1922:  “KELLY RAND DOING DEVELOPMENT WORK—Randsburg, Feb. 21.—Development work on the Kelly Rand Extension Mining property, which is located only 1200 feet from the famous California Rand Silver Incorporated mine, is progressing rapidly.  At a depth of 30 feet, the miners opened up a ledge which is expected to develop into the same high grade ore which made the California Rand pay dividends from the grass-roots.

During the past few days a number of Bakersfield people have visited the property, among then being C. A. Bloomer, Robert Coats and family, Dr. S. C. Long, Henry Hanson, Tod Mosier and J. W. Stewart, a prominent mining engineer.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 4, 1922:  “SENDS GOOD NEWS FROM KELLY RAND –Superintendent Herkelroth Convinced Excellent Ore Will Be Struck. – Prospects of striking a rich ledge of silver ore in the Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company’s shaft, adjoining the famous California ( R )and Silver Incorporated mine at Randsburg, are exceptionally good, according to information received from the Rand district today by Charles Bloemer, a director of the concern, and in charge of the company’s stock sales.

Bloemer received a letter from Superintendent Ed Herkelrath which says; “The formation is looking fine.  In fact I am having some assays made as the vein is running toward the big silver, and I believe we are on what is called the Juanita fault.  If so we can expect ore at any time.  The rock is identical with that first struck in the California Rand Silver, and as I say, runs contrary to the Gallaher vein, which is one of the best indications I have seen in any of the workings in our vicinity.

The letter continues in an optimistic tone and points out that the California Rand Silver is only 1200 feet away.  “The Coyote’s new shaft,” the letter says, “which lays northeast of the Kelly Rand Extension, is down about 45 feet with still the cap rock.  The Kelly Rand is down about 34 feet and is in the formation about 12 feet.  A seam of blue mud is coming in on the east side of the shaft which shows we were lucky enough to strike right on a contact vein.”

In conclusion Herkelrath says, “I feel fine over the looks of things and expect to show you “some real rock” when you come over to Randsburg again.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 5, 1922:  “THE KELLY RAND EXTENSION have erected a tripod temporarily and a small hoist awaiting the arrival of their machinery.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 29, 1922:  “KELLY EXTENSION ADDS MACHINERY—Electric Equipment Being Installed at Mine in Rand District.  Recent silver strikes in the Randsburg district surrounding the famous California Rand Silver Incorporated by M. J. Errecaart, have spurred other companies in the vicinity to rush development work along intensive lines.

The latest concern to extend its line of development is the Kelly Rand Extension which is now installing complete electrical equipment for permanent development and production.  The work of installation is under the supervision of Secretary-Manager Arthur C. Tupman, who is having the work rushed.

“The work of sinking the vertical shaft has been suspended at a depth of 100 feet,” said Charles Bloemer, director in the company, today, “in order to install the machinery necessary for permanent activity.  An electric hoist is being installed and an air compressor will be in working order in a few days.  We expect to strike pay dirt a depth of from 200 to 250 feet, but are prepared to go deeper if necessary.”

The Kelly Rand Extension property is directly between the Errecart strike and the California Rand Silver Incorporated, which practically proves the presence of ore in the Kelly. The company also owns three claims near the North Rand, which recently made a rich strike.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 29, 1922:  “ERRECART STRIKE GIVES HOPE TO PROSPECTORS – Randsburg, March 29.—M. J. Errecart who has been leasing on the K. C. N. group for the past two years has struck shipping ore  in the drift 200 feet below the surface.

In the face of the drift samples gave assays of $45 to $93 per ton.  The values occur as ruby silver ore.  The face of the drift is about 50 feet from the shaft which the present California Rand Company was working in when the Big Silver was discovered and in which J. W. Hecks was leasing a few months ago.

The Kelly Rand Extension property is close to the Errecart land and the strike is very encouraging to those interested in the Extension, which now has a shaft down more than 85 feet with good indications showing.

The new water line from the Yellow Aster mine is delivering water to the supply tanks at the Big Silver up to rated capacity.  This will eliminate the necessity of bringing in water in railroad tank cars for the 150-ton flotati0n plant.” – Bakersfield Californian

April 4, 1922: “BOTH THE KELLY RAND EXTENSION and Mizpah-Montana are about ready to sign up with the Southern Sierras Power Co. for sub-stations.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 15, 1922:  “ENTHUSIASM ABSORBED – One meets optimism on every side and this is most apparent in the district surrounding the California Rand.  Herman Miller of the Mizpah-Montana which also adjoins the Kelly Rand Extension visited his property with James Ogden and Harry Suttle, Beth Miller and Ogden visited the Kelly Rand and absorbed some of the enthusiasm which is so apparent there.

The Gallagher, or Silver Moon, which adjoins the Kelly Rand Extension has torn out its light machinery and is installing heavier hoisting apparatus to go to a greater depth and to handle the ore from its drift toward the Kelly Rand where rich ruby silver was found a few days ago.  The drift goes directly goes directly toward the Kelly Rand line at a depth of approximately 300 feet and it is believed that by drifting from a similar depth the Kelly Rand will pick up this high-grade ore.

BLOEMOER VISITS MINE—Charles Bloemer, one of the directors of the Kelly Rand, who has offices in the Hopkins building here, was a visitor to the yesterday and expressed his satisfaction with progress of the work.  Arthur C. Tupman, superintendent, is making preparations to sink the shaft at a speedy rate and is putting on three shifts daily to rush the job of getting to the ore body.  Every miner working on the job, from the foreman to the mucker is certain that the Kelly Rand Extension is going to be one of the biggest producers in the district.

M. Plantier accompanied Ted Mosler to the mine yesterday and after going down the shaft and inspecting the workings, Plantier was impressed with the prospects for a wonderful mine.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 14, 1922: “KELLY RAND EXTENSION—sinking just west of the Montana-Mizpah are down now over 180 ft. and are directly in the schist.  They are making 4 ½ to 5 feet per day and have timbered their shaft all the way down.  They are doing real mining and as soon as they are down as deep as they have planned to go they will then begin cross cutting to prospect for the ore bodies expected in the ground.” –The Rand District News

June 29, 1922:  “SILVER STRIKES IN RAND REPORTED – Many Properties Coming Into Limelight as the Coyote Finds Ore. – Randsburg, June 29, Silver strikes are being made right and left in the Randsburg district, in the vicinity of the California Rand Silver incorporated mine.  Latest reports from the southern end of the field show that the Coyote claim has found $1,000 ore on the 600-foot level.  Jay A. Carpenter, engineer for the Coyote, declares that the strike was made in a drift about 130 feet southwest of the main shaft.

The Silver Belle is sinking fast, just west of the “big silver,” and expects to tap the rich ore soon.  To the north, the Kelly Rand extension (sic) is believed to be “right on top” of the silver lode and has entered a soft formation which gives indications of developing into a ledge of very rich ore.  According to Superintendent Arthur C. Tupman, the rock is of the same character as that found in the California Rand just prior to running into the shipping high grade.

The Herkelrath & Carroll shaft is down 23o feet, with fair indications, and ore is now being shipped from the Errecart property, just north of the Kelly Rand Extension.

The shaft being put down by Ed T. Grady is nearing the 900-foot level and is in ore carrying small values, which are believed to be topping a large high-grade body.” –Bakersfield California

July 17, 1922:  “The extent of a ruby silver strike in the Kelly Rand Extension mine, adjoining the “big silver” is being awaited by Kern county investors.” –Bakersfield Californian.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 7, 1922:  “NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCKHOLDERS KELLY RAND EXTENSION MINING COMPANY

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company will be held at the office of said Corporation in the Hopkins Building, corner Nineteenth and Chester Avenue, in the City of Bakersfield, State of California, on Tuesday, the 7th day of November, 1922, at the hour of 2 o’clock p. m., for the purpose of electing directors for the ensuing year and for the transaction of such other business that may properly come before the meeting.

C. Tupman

Secretary of the Kelly Rand Extension

Mining Company

Oct. 19 to Nov. 7, Incl.

Bakersfield Californian

December 7, 1922:  “Nothing doing on the Mizpah-Montana and it looked like a holiday at the Kelly Rand Extension.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 29, 1924:  “NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCKHOLDERS KELLY RAND EXTENSION MINING COMPANY

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company will be held at the office of the Corporation Room 3, Kern County Land Company Building, corner Nineteenth and “H” streets, in the City of Bakersfield, State of California, on

Wednesday, the 5th day of November, 1924, at the hour of 2 o’clock p. m., for the purpose of electing directors for the ensuing  year and for the transaction of such other business that may properly come before the meeting.

  1. C. Tupman

Secretary of the Kelly Rand Extension

Mining Company

Oct. 21 to Nov. 1, Incl.

Bakersfield Californian

January 8, 1924: “PREPERATIONS are now under way for the sinking of the Kelly Rand Extension.—Bakersfield Californian

February 27, 1924: “RANDSBURG MINES ARE LISTED ON N. Y. CURB—Randsburg, Feb. 27.—The Kelly Extension, formerly the Bisbee & Brey, is listed on the New York curb, quoted at 60 cents.  This may mean a resumption of the prospect workings.  With the Belcher extension capitalized for $1,000.000 and 10,000,000 shares also listed on the curb, Randsburg and the Rand mining district will get a wider publicity, especially in the eastern cities.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE SHAFT OF THE Kelly Rand Extension Mining Company lies about 1500 feet north of west from the California Rand No. 1 shaft.  The shaft is 1 ½ compartment, vertical, and 625 feet deep.  The only lateral work consists of 80 feet of crosscuts on the 600 foot level.  No veins were found.  The property was closed down early in 1923.  It is understood that further work was being undertaken in the fall of 1923.” --Hulin

MIZPAH MONTANA

CHRONOLOGY

October 3, 1921: “THE SHAFT OF THE Mizpah Extension is down 25 feet in pretty fair formation.” –Bakersfield Californian. October 8, 1921: “MIZPAH EXTENSION SHAFT now down 30 feet.” – Bakersfield Californian

Mizpah Montana Mining Company Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

January 19, 1922: “RANDSBURG, JAN. 18.—Sunday’s crowd in addition to the weekend visitors enjoyed the perfect weather now in evidence on the desert.  Every part of the Rand District was alive with visitors.  Owing to the activity in and around the North Rand, it looked as lively as a picnic, the Californian Rand Silver, the Grady Lease, the Coyote and the Bray, had a line of visitors, the Mizpah-Montana, the Kelly Rand Extension and the Silver Moon, like the various shafts in the neighborhood of the Black Hawk, had their friends. –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 19, 1922:  “SMITH AND FAUNT LE ROY made a successful fun Sunday from Bakersfield, with the following visitors, Harry E. Hughes, chief accountant of the Espee, Fresno; Geo. A. Hally, merchant, Fresno; Mitchel Casitilo, Dinuba; Frank Rice, superintendent for Miller and Lux, Buttonwillow; Geo. Steele, same rancho;   J.  L. Long, Superintendent Standard Oil, Gates lease; Chris Moen, rig builder, same address; all bound for the Mizpah-Montana.  After a careful going over of this close in property the men were taken to the different camps; all retuning with a general idea of the immense opportunities of the silver zones of the Rand mining district.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 25, 1922: “THE MONTANA MIZPAH IS PUSHING active development at this time and has a favorable showing at the bottom of the shaft.  Directors of this company are C. F. Smith and E. J. Faunt Le Roy of Bakersfield.”—Bakersfield Californian

April 2, 1922: “BOTH THE KELLY RAND EXTENSION AND MIZPAH-MONTANA are about ready to sign up with the Southern Sierras Power, Co., for sub-stations.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 2, 1922:  “WITHOUT PLAYING ANY FAVORITES we still believe that the Mizpah-Montana shaft will make the pace.  There is a number of properties that are now finishing headframes and a number of others ready to erect, while others are waiting for their lumber to be trucked out to the shafts.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 16, 1922:  “TWO TRUCKS LOADED down with a compressor outfit for the Mizpah-Montana arrived Friday.  Supt. Riley Hughes has all preparations and foundations set for the new hoist, compressor and the other heavy machinery that is enroute.  We look for some action and record sinking, both in time and costs when operations are resumed.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 29, 1922:  “RANDSBURG, APRIL 29. – With depth the Mizpah-Montana ore is improving in looks and values.  Horn and ruby silver with increasing sulphides are showing stronger, all of which goes towards the making of another big shipper.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

June 14, 1922:  “MIZPAH-MONTANA, already equipped with a most modern plant including a 100 H. P.  electric motor, Sullivan Angle compressor of 450 cu.  ft. capacity, 70 foot gallows frame, and sinking a 7 x 12 foot double compartment shaft, are holding the attention of many in camp.  This promising property has encountered some mighty fine showings while sinking through the granite where no values were even expected, that something worthwhile is looked for when the schist is reached and prospecting for the ore begins.  Mr. Hughes has been setting foundations the past week for a larger hoist which will be installed immediately.  The shaft is down now about 325 feet and they are making 6 ft. a day, placing one full 6 ft. set of timbers every day and one additional set once a week.” –The Rand District News

June 18, 1922:  “WE ARE LOOKING FOR another rich find in the Mizpah-Montana shaft.  Superintendent Riley Hughes, states that at $40 the mineralization is looking more favorable and would not be surprised that they will encounter good showings before the 500 depth is reached.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 4, 1922:  “HERMAN T. MILLER, a director of the Mizpah Montana Silver, make a quick trip up from Bakersfield in company with Chas F. Johnson of the Johnson and Cleary lease.  As usual they brought up copies of the Bakersfield Morning Echo.  –Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 4, 1922:  “WITH THE SHOWINGS both at the bottom, 500 feet and at the new station on the hundred of the Mizpah Montana, big things are looked for this month.  If the present system of developing and prospection is carried on; that is, to cross-cut at the different levels, the mine will be tested out.  Owing to the sudden illness of his 12-year-old daughter, Manager C. C. Karnes was compelled to hurry to Redondo.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 5, 1922:  “MIZPAH MONTANA IS DOWN 515 FEET – Randsburg, Aug. 5 – The Mizpah-Montana has now reached a depth of 515 feet and has very good indications in the bottom of the shaft.  Stations have been cut at the 100, 220, and 340 and 500 foot levels and at present are drifting on the 100 foot level to develop the ore bodies encountered at that point at the time of sinking the shaft.  Additional equipment in the form of cage and cars to facilitate drifting and cross cutting are expected any day.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 5, 1922: “HALF A DOZEN COMPANIES are sinking shafts to the northwest of the reef, one of whom, the Montana-Mizpah, went through 400 ft. of granite, before entering the schist ; they have cut, in the shaft, both in the granite and schist, north-south veins carrying small amounts of gold and silver.” –ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS

Mizpah Montana Mine. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Company Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family.

August 5, 1922: “AT RANDSBURG, Kern County, Calif., active work is going on in thirty-five shafts, according to the U. S. Geological Survey.  The Yellow Aster is using diamond drills in prospecting its ground.  Twenty stamps of the mill are dropping. There has been excitement over a strike in the Mizpah mine, near Johannesburg.” --ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS

December 7, 1922:  “ON THE MIZPAH-MONTANA they are working on the 500, 400 and 100, principally prospecting in up raises.” – Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 29, 1922:  “SET SUIT HEARING—February 19 has been set for the hearing of a damage suit in which Rosenburg and Company of Los Angeles ask $2680.55 judgment against the Mizpah Montana mining company.  The case will be tried in department three, superior court.  The legal firm of Clafin and Lambert will represent the plaintiff and Attorney C. V. Anderson is counsel for the defense.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 5, 1923: “THE RUMOR PREVALENT IN BAKERSFIELD that the Mizpah-Montana had abandoned its shaft and removed the machinery is untrue.  A visit to the mine today found them actively sinking a winze on the 500 level south in a large and well-defined vein.  Their showing is excellent and a commercial ore body may be encountered at any time, though they are yet over 200 feet from the depth level at which the California Rand encountered high grade in its No. 6 shaft.” – Bakersfield Californian

February 27, 1923: “A NUMBER OF INTERESTED SHARE HOLDERS of the Mizpah Montana were up from Bakersfield Sunday looking over the situation.  It is the desire to fully equip the plant and send the shaft down another 300 feet or to the eight hundred.  It is a noticeable fact that all of the Nevada companies now operating here are only working one shift, curtailing expenses is the excuse.  Possibly that is the reason that Bush street is not kind in the daily quotations sent out.” – Bakersfield Californian

Mizpah Montana Mine. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Co. Survery. Collection of Betty Hadley Famiily

March 24, 1923: “GOOD SUBSTANTIAL BUILDINGS, hoist house, blacksmith shop and change room, are now being erected on the Mizpah Montana workings, the material for the cement foundations for the heavy machinery ordered is being trucked in, all of which show some action.”—Bakersfield Californian

Mineral Survey No. 5716 Independence Land District, Surveyed July 13, 1923 Known as Montana Fraction and Mizpah Extension, owned by Mizpah-Montana Mining Company, Improvements consist of 4 shafts, 3 cuts, 2 shafts and cuts, and 1 shaft crosscut and drifts, valued at $24,170.

October 4, 1923: “EAST AND NORTH OF THE TREASURE HILL property the Mizpah-Montana has with –in the week cut a good vein of ore which is thought by many to be the old Juanita vein from which many thousands of dollars has been taken.  Several pieces of ground contiguous to the Mizpah have changed  hands since the strike was reported, showing the interest and confidence in that property which is under the supervision of Engineer C. C. Taylor.—Bakersfield Californian

October 24, 1923: “THE OWNERS OF THE CUVE CLAIM, now operating the Mizpah Montana shaft have decided to drift to their claim from the 725 level, the latter depth having just been made.  The Cuve people are prepared to thoroughly prospect, develop and advance in search of both gold and silver values.”–Bakersfield Californian

December 17, 1923: “ON THE 700-FOOT CROSS-CUT on the Cuve claim, good, favorable formation of silver bearing rock is beginning to show, some 200 feet from the main shaft of the Mizpah Montana.”—Bakersfield Californian

January 28, 1924: “THE CUVE PEOPLE are still cross-cutting, using the Mizpah Montana shaft at the seventh.”—Bakersfield Californian

February 7, 1924:  “ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS –Mizpah Montana Mining Company—The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Mizpah Montana Mining Company, a corporation, will be held in Room 121 of the Hay Building, corner Nineteenth and I streets, City of Bakersfield, County of Kern, State of California, on Friday, February 15, 1924, at 11 o’clock a. m., for the selection of Directors and such other business as may properly come before said meeting.

DATED: February 4, 1924

AUTREY K. TROUTNER

Secretary

Feb. 2 to 15, inc.

March 1925: “THIS PROPERTY, comprising two fractional claims owned by the Mizpah Montana Mining Company, Inc., lies 1500 feet northwest from the California Rand No. 1 Shaft.  The property is developed by a 2-compartment, vertical shaft 700 feet deep, and by approximately 1300 feet of horizontal workings distributed among seven levels.  The level interval is 100 feet.  No work has been done on the 300 and 600 foot levels aside from cutting stations.  The workings are partly in quartz monzonite and partly in schist, being located near the intrusive contact between these two groups of rocks. Two small bunches of ore were removed from a series of veinlets near the shaft station on the 100-foot level.  The veinlets formed a mall in the quartz monzonite.  The silver minerals identified as being present were cerargyrite and mizrgyrite.  Approximately 12 to 15 tons of ore were mined which were said to average $20.00 in gold and about 100 ounces in silver per ton. On the 500 level a vein was encountered 60 feet south of the shaft.  This vein was picked up again northeast of the shaft.  To the shaft it varies from 4 to 10 feet in width and gives average assays of $7.00 to $9.00.  Of these 3 to 5 ounces is silver.  Some assays as high as $34.00, chiefly gold, have been obtained.   The latest prospecting work in the mine is being carried on northeast of the shaft on the 7th level along what is probably a continuation of this vein.” --Hulin

LEGAL NOTICES –NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT –

MIZPAH MONTANA MINING COMPANY, a corporation; location of principal place of business, Bakersfield, California.

NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN, that at a meeting of the directors held on the 14th day of May, 1924, an assessment of one (1c) cent per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable on or before June 14, 1924, to the Secretary of the corporation, at the office of the corporation, Room 131, Hay Building, Bakersfield, California.

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 14th day of June, 1924, will be delinquent, and will be advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made before, will be sold on the 14th day of July, 1924 at the hour of 10 o’clock a. m. at the office of the corporation above named, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale.

  1. K. TROUTNER

Secretary

Office of the Company, 131 Hay Building, Bakersfield, California

May 16-23-30; June 4-13

October 19, 1928:  “THREE ARRESTED AS LEADERS OF DESERT BANDITS—Power Equipment Stolen at Randsburg Found in Lengthy Probe – Believed to be the leaders of a ring of mine machinery bandits that has operated in the Randsburg district of eastern Kern County over a period of two years, three men are under arrest for the alleged theft of power equipment stolen January 25 from the Mizpah Montana Mining Company at Randsburg, the sheriff’s office reported today.

The announcement was made by Deputy Sheriff Al Renfro, following receipt of a telegram reporting the arrest of Jack Gordon at Copalis Bench, Wash.  The arrest of Gordon, formerly a worker in the Randsburg mining district, concluded an investigation extending over a period of almost nine months during which time Deputy Renfro secured information which finally led to the arrest of the trio and the recovery of the entire power plant of the Mizpah Montana mine.

TWO IN JAIL—The other two men under arrest both of whom are now in the county jail, are Joe Demchop and Joseph Rom, both workers in the Randsburg mines.  Demchop who officials allege has admitted to the theft of the mine machinery was arrested in Randsburg.  Rom was apprehended a few days ago at Tonopah, Nev.

Enlarging the scope of the investigation to cover four states, the mine machinery, which included two powerful motors, starters, switches and all equipment was recovered three week ago at Kingman, Ariz., where it had been sold for $372 to the Midnight Machinery House, Deputy Renfro announced.

According to the deputy, who has worked with sheriffs of Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties, and counties in Arizona, Nevada and Washington over a period of months, the trio of men alleged to have taken the machinery has been “pegged” since shortly after the was reported and the investigation launched, but it was not until the machinery was finally located in Arizona that the series of arrests was made.

TRUNK IN TRANSIT—Demchop was the first to be arrested by Deputy Renfro.  Then Rom was taken in Tonopah by Nevada officials and brought to Bakersfield by Deputy C. E. Gatchell.

Gordon was traced through the shipment of a trunk.  Local officials learned that he was in Arizona, but by the time Deputy Renfro arrived there, the miner was gone.  He had shipped his trunk to Fresno, where Kern officials notified Fresno authorities to keep close check on the trunk.

Three days ago, Gordon ordered the trunk shipped to Copalis Bench, Wash., where he was arrested by Washington authorities.

Charges of burglary have been filed against the three men and Deputy Renfro today is seeking papers from Gov. C. C. Young to extradite Gordon from Washington.  The Kern deputy will leave tonight for the northern state.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 17, 1928: “TRIAL ON BURGLARY CHARGES IS OPENED.—Jack Gordon and Joseph Rom charged with burglary, went on trial today before Judge R. B. Lanbart, of the Superior Court and a jury.  “The two defendants are charged with having stolen machinery belonging to the Mizpah Montana Mining Company with holdings near Randsburg, according to the district attorney’s office.

Actually, the theft occurred in San Bernardino County, within five hundred yards of the Kern county line.  The law provides that such cases may be tried in the county primarily concerned, and as this county is the one concerned, the case is being tried here.

Tom Scott, Jr., assistant district attorney, is prosecuting the case while Attys. James O. Reavis and B. Marks appearing for the defendants.  The talesmen who will hear the testimony will be impaneled from a drawn jury Hat.

This trial is one of the first cases held in the Superior Court involving criminal charges, within several weeks.  A majority of defendants of late months, have entered pleas of guilty and been sentenced without the ado of a jury trial.” –Bakersfield Californian

MIZPAH NEVADA

CHRONOLOGY

August 5, 1922:  :MIZPAH NEVADA IS NEW MINE COMPANY—Randsburg, Aug. 5.—One of the latest companies to start operations in the Rand District is the Mizpah Nevada Mining company, situated on the Mistake Fraction, and New Claim and adjoining the Mizpah Montana on the north.  The new shaft was started August 2 and operations will go forward as rapidly as possible.  G. Cleveland Taylor, well known mining engineer of Randsburg, is in charge of this property.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 7, 1922: “NOTHING DOING TODAY on the Mizpah Nevada.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 27, 1923: “A NEW HEAD FRAME graces the workings of the Mizpah-Nevada besides another building has been added.” – Bakersfield Californian

March 14, 1923:  “IF DEEP MINING will bring results they are going to get them in the Mizpah Montana, with the K. C. N. a close second, the Treasure Hill the Mizpah Nevada and the Silver Moon making good headway, that part of the district will again show the life that puts the pep into the go-getters in other parts of the district.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 24, 1923: “THE MIZPAH NEVADA LEASE is now trying to arrange to secure air from a nearby plant to enable them to use machines on the extreme hard formation encountered in their shaft.”—Bakersfield Californian

April 10, 1923: THE MIZPAH NEVADS WILL HAVE to wait for air connections before proceeding through the hard formations now in their shaft.”  Bakersfield Californian

August 9, 1923:  “NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS MIZPAH-NEVADA MINING COMPANY, BAKERSFIELD, KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Mizpah-Nevads Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, 314 Hopkins Building, Bakersfield, California, on Monday the 13th day of August, 1923, at the hour of 2 o’clock p. m. for the purpose of electing a board of directors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting.

Every stockholder is requested to be present in person or by proxy.

By order of the Board of Directors

Dated:  July 31, 1923

F. J. B URNS

Secretary

Aug. 1 to 13 inc.

March 1925: “THIS PROPERTY, composing a fractional claim and an option on two adjoining claims, lies 1200 feet northwest of the Mizpah Montana.  It is owned by the Mizpah Nevada Mining Company, Inc. The property is developed by a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft, 150 feet deep, and a 40-foot crosscut to the south.  All the workings are in quartz monzonite.  A small irregular diabase dike is exposed at the bottom of the shaft.  Work on the property has been discontinued.” –Hulin

NAVAJO AND SWASTIKA

CHRONOLOGY

Swastika Shaft. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Company Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family

October 3, 1921: “BOTH SHAFTS ON THE GRADY HOLDINGS out on the flat are being sunk.  On number one the installation of the Ingersoll-Rand compressor is nearing completion.”  Bakersfield Californian

October 8, 1921: “ON THE EDDIE GRADY ESTATE under Red Mountain, they are ready to turn over all of the new machinery all of the new machinery tuned up.  A large building enclosing the machinery has just been finished.” Bakersfield Californian

February 25. 1922: “NEW ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT for the Grady Venture shaft is being installed.  The shaft is down now to a depth of 390 feet and further sinking called for heavier equipment.  They have not as yet struck bed rock.” – Bakersfield Californian

September 9, 1922: “THE SWASTIKA MINING CO., headed by E. T. Grady, is now operating two properties about 2000 ft.  Southwest of the old Grady Lease.  The No. 1 shaft is now down to a depth of 995 ft., bedrock having been encountered at 675 ft.  The No. 2 shaft is still in the wash.” --ENGINEERING AND MINING JOURNAL-PRESS

March 24, 1923: “RICH RUBY STRIKES BRING NEW HOPE – Presence of White Metal in Grady Property is reported by Jo P. Carroll –Randsburg, March 24, — We can now state that the district is looking better every day.  With the rich ruby smeared all over the eighth and tenth levels of the Grady; ruby sticking in the rock in the face of the Fox lease crosscut on the 775 level and breaking into milling ore on the drift running from the crosscut on Garford and Ratcliffe lease on the Reservoir claim.—Bakersfield Californian

Grady Swastika Shaft in Osdick 1922. Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey, Collection of Betty Hadley family.

March 24, 1923: “ALFRED HARRELL of the California Rand Silver Incorporated, accompanied by interested shareholders, Ben Sill, Alex Wark, and J. A. Hughes, with D. B. Braden of the American Securities as their guest, made a midweek visit to the district.  E. T. Grady of the Swastika group is receiving the hearty congratulations from every end of the district with the wish that the good showings of the past few days in the “Grady” may prove stronger and better when they strike vein.”—Bakersfield Californian

October 4, 1923: “GRADY DISCOVERY—there are a number of other operating companies that will soon be in the producing class.  E. T. Grady has just announced the discovery of a ledge of ruby silver on his property showing 69 ounces to the ton.  The vein is said to be strong, the metal being found in precisely the same formation existing in the California Rand Silver.”—Bakersfield Californian

Swastika Mine Operated By Ed. Grady Who Had Made a Fortune On a Lease On the California Rand Silver Company's Property. He Had Removed Over 1.5 Million Dollars of Ore Before His Lease Rand Out. Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey, Collection of Betty Hadley Family

January 28, 1924: “The Grady is still actively cross-cutting on the eighth level.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE NAVAJO AND SWASTIKA SHAFTS are locally called the Grady No. 2 and No. 1 shafts, respectively.  The Swastika Shaft was in alluvium and the Rosamond formation to a depth of 497 feet when the schist was entered. The Navajo Shaft, 2-compartment and vertical, passed through 670 feet of Rosamond sandstones before entering the schist.  The shaft is 1130 feet deep, levels being cut at 800 feet (8th level) and 975 feet (10th level).  No veins were encountered on the 10th level, the schist being blocky and in general unaltered.  On the 8th level a vein was encountered about 200 feet northwest of the shaft.  This vein strikes approximately about 200 feet northwest of the shaft.  This vein varies from 2 to 10 feet, and throughout is assays from 2 to 10 ounces of silver per ton, with locally much higher values.” –Hulin

ONEY LEASE

March 1925: “THE ONEY LEASE is located about 800 feet west of the Garford Lease.  The property is developed by a shaft 200 feet deep.  The vein as a whole where exposed on the 150 foot level is said to assay from $50 to $75 per ton, but in the center of the vein is a streak of high grade ore which is said to run as high as $2600 per ton.  Locally this streak is 6 inches wide.  Efforts are now being made to cut this ore shoot on the 200-foot level.” --Hulin

RAND CONTACT

CHRONOLOGY

January 23, 1923: “THE RAND CONTACT MINING COMPAY is the latest in the field.  They are seeking bids for the sinking of a 50-foot shaft on their holdings south of the Black Hawk mine.  Both Gold and silver showings are found from the grass roots.’ –Bakersfield Californian

March 14, 1923: “A LONG HIKE to the Rand Contact shaft found them just starting on the cutting of timbers for their headframe, which will be completed and installed within the next ten days, at which period they expect to have their new hoist, compressor and machinery en route.  The Rand Contact lies just south of the Black Hawk gold mine and mill.” – Bakersfield Californian

March 24, 1923: “AT THE RAND CONTACT they are making good headway with their new head frame: the hoist buckets and car have been unloaded on the workings.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 30, 1923:  “AT THE RAND CONTACT they have things going along good, head frame is being trimmed with all safety devices and machinery ready to turn over.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 31, 1924:  “GUY DIXON, doing assessment work near the Contact Rand shaft, believed that with a little depth a vein cut into will make good ore.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE RAND CONTACT SILVER GROUP is composed of five claims located south of the Black Hawk mine near the contact between the quartz monzonite and the schist.  The property is developed by a vertical shaft, 100 feet deep, and a drift south for 120 feet, run in an effort to intersect the contact.  Work was suspended before the contact was reached.” –Hulin

RAND MOUNTAIN GROUP — Exposed Fissure, Exposed Fissure Extension, Hidden Vault No. 2, Deep Treasure, G.S.C., Shoestring Fraction Extension, and Surprise Lodes.

CHRONOLOGY

August 18, 1922: “MINE RESCUE CAR TO STOP IN KERN TOWNS—To instruct miners and quarry workers in safety and rescue work in their employment a crew with U. S. bureau of mines rescue car No. 1, on annual tour, will visit mining communities of Kern county during the period of October 1 to November 24, inclusive, according to advices received here today.  The car will stop at Johannesburg, Monolith, Atolia, and nearby mining centers including Randsburg.

R. E. Donovan, former miner, and J. J. Delhide, first-aid miner, will man the rescue car on its trip this year.

The schedule of the rescue instructors in Kern county has been announced as follows:  To be at the property of the Randsburg Silver Mining Company, Randsburg, October 2 to 6, at the Mizpah-Montana Mining Company, Randsburg, October 9 to 13; Rand Mountain Silver Company, Atolia, October 16 to 20, Californian Rand Silver, Incorporated, Randsburg, October 24 to 27, and the Monolith Portland Cement Company and Pacific Coast Borax Company, Monolith, October 29 to November 21.

The itinerary of the car takes in several mining districts of Nevada previous to the arrival in Johannesburg.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

Rand Mountain Silver Mining Co. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Famly

August 20, 1922:  “RAND MOUNTAIN CO. ‘ON THE JOB’  — One of the mining projects in the Rand district that has attracted much attention is the Rand Mountain Silver Mining Co.  The company was organized some months ago, but those promoting the enterprise have not been making much noise.  They have been working hard, however, in driving away with hammer and tongs, developing their various holdings in the district.  The company owns three important properties is close in proved territory.  The company is now concentrating its efforts on the Carlisle property, which adjoins the Kelly, Coyote, Silver King and new Grady mines.

Since the big strike by the Grady, this property is looked upon by mining men as being one of the most promising in the district, it is said.  The well known Stampeder group, consisting of six full mining claims in the North end of the district has a well defined vein of high grade silver ore, it is  claimed.  Picked samples from this vein which has shaft on it fifty feet deep, run as high, it is claimed, as $6,000 a ton.

The company also has a tract of 120 acres to the west of the Yellow Aster and Kelly mine. This property is seamed with veins of gold and silver bearing ore.  The company expects to have its shaft now sinking on the Carlisle property into the rich beds of high grade silver ore common to the district, within the next 90 days.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 26, 1923: “GOOD HEADWAY IS BEING MADE on the Rand Mountain shaft, now to a depth of 265 feet.  The secretary, J. H. Cowley, is up from Los Angeles headquarters of the company.  Mr. Cowley states that they own an even 100 acres and will make suitable terns on leasing blocks of ground.  As this company’s holdings are so well connected up with the lines of proven ore bodies and with the showings of the past week, it is believed that when it is generally known that leases can be had, that the same will be snapped up.  The land is between the Grady Swastika group, Silver King, and the Randsburg Silvers original Coyote mine,” – Bakersfield Californian

Mineral Survey NO. 5725, Independence Land District, Surveyed December 18, 1923, Owned by Rand Mountain Silver Mining Company, Improvements consist of 9 shafts, and 1 shaft and drift, Valued at $12,500

January 10, 1924:  “DEEDS MINING PROPERTY  –G. F. Washburn has deeded to the Rand Mountain Silver Mining  Company the north half of the southeast quarter of the  northwest quarter  of section 16, 30-40, for a consideration of $10.  The property is located in the Randsburg mining district. –Bakersfield  Californian

May 31, 1924:  “NOTICE OF MEETING—Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Rand Mountain Silver Mining Company will be held at No. 1825 Chester avenue, in the City of Bakersfield, in the State of California, on Saturday, June the 14th , 1924, at 2 p. m. for the purpose of electing directors and transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting, including acting upon and determining the future welfare of the stockholders and its holdings.

RAND MOUNTAIN SILVER

MINING COMPANY

Floyd H. Barnett, President

Zimmerman, Secretary and Treasurer

Dated: May 31, 1924

May 31: June 4-7-11

Bakersfield Californian

September 9, 1924:  “LEGAL NOTICES –NOTICE OF STOCK ASSESSMENT –RAND MOUNTAIN SILVER MINING COMPANY –A Corporation with its present place of business at 1801 “M” Street, Bakersfield, California.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a meeting of the Directors, held on the 11th day of August, 1924, an assessment of six cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, payable to the Secretary and Treasurer, R. L. Walters, 1801 “M” Street, Bakersfield, California, on or before September 13th , 1924.  Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on September 15th at the hour of one o’clock p. m. of said day will be delinquent and offered for sale at public auction, and, unless payment is made before, will be sold on the first day of October, 1924, at the hour of one o’clock p. m. of said day, to pay the delinquent assessment and expenses of sale.

R. L. WALTERS

Secretary, and Treasurer, Rand Mountain Silver Mining Co.  1801 “M” Street, Bakersfield, California.

Aug. 12- 19- 26,  Sept. 2-9

Bakersfield Californian

September 20, 1924:  “NOTICE —RAND MOUNTAIN SILVER MINING COMPANY—Location of principal place of business, 1801 “M” Street, Bakersfield, California.

There is delinquent upon the following described stock on account of assessment levied on the 11th day of August, 1924, the several amounts set opposite the names of the respective share holders as follows:

(A Long list of stockholders name, number of shares, assessment due etc. was listed.)

March 1925: “THE RAND MOUNTAIN GROUP, composed of six claims lying northeast of the Navaho Shaft is operated by the Rand Mountain Silver Mining Company, Inc. The developments consist of a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft 435 feet deep.  The shaft is entirely in the Rosamond Formation.  No work has been done on this property since the fall of 1923.” –Hulin

RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINES, INC

. CHRONOLOGY

Myra Queen Shaft. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family.

November 30, 1921:  “NEW SILVER STRIKE MADE AT RANDSBURG – Randsburg, Nov. 30—On the Myra Queen property consisting of six claims northeast of the California Rand Silver Inc., at a depth of ten feet, a vein has been uncovered two feet in width, with high grade values assaying 70 per ton.  The ore shows both horn silver and ruby silver.

On the surface was a vein of quartz about two inches in thickness, and assaying $45.  At six feet the vein had widened to 16 inches in thickness and the growth is continuing with the depth.

Timber has been ordered for the shaft and lumber for the construction of the camp.  A compressor and hoist will be installed on the property shortly, with intent to sink to a depth of 1000 feet if necessary.

The Myra Queen is controlled by William Chedle, Borchera and associates, among whom are a number of Bakersfield men.  George A. Hill is superintendent.”—Bakersfield Californian

January 21, 1922:  “RANDSBURG, JAN. 20, — On Friday the 13th, the last order for shares in the 200,000 allotment by Myra Queen Mines, were disposed of and the books for the sale of treasury stock were closed.

Supt. Hill for the past week has had his force busily working on the preliminaries to the hauling of material for the laying of a substantial foundation for the heavy new electrical machinery that is now being trucked to the Myra Queen shaft.  The present depth of their working shaft is 75 feet in most encouraging formation for the white metal.” – Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 22, 1922:  “RANDSBURG, Jan. 21.—Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Borchers, of the Myra Queen Mines, with Dr. C. A. Rodgers, arrived Wednesday morning.  Up to this date, Mr. Borchers, holds the record between Bakersfield and Randsburg.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 31, 1922:  “THE HEADFRAME on the Myra Queen group was nicely installed Friday afternoon; in another week all of their machinery should be running in form.  Water pipe line is being laid in.” – Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 25, 1922: “THE MYRA QUEEN PROPERTY shows very encouraging progress.  All their machinery is now installed and the work of sinking the shaft will begin immediately.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1, 1922:  “W. C. Borchers of the Myra Queen mines with Emile Abadie, mining engineer late of South Africa, and an old associate of John Hays Hammond, Henry Miles of Goldfield and Albert Jones, Jr., of Bakersfield, paid a visit to the Myra Queen Sunday.” – Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 2, 1922: “Installation of the new 50 h. p. hoist and equipment is about to be completed, and sinking of the main shaft should start this week, with two full shifts.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 7, 1922:  “A VISIT TO THE MYRA QUEEN property shows a lot of work going on.  A brand new hoist, compressor and other heavy machinery are being installed.  The gallows frame is a most substantial affair.  With the usual buildings on a well provided mining plant the Myra Queen is making a big showing.” —- Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 15, 1922:  “The shaft of the Myra Queen is down now 72 feet, and a 50 horsepower machine has been installed and they start sinking at once. –Bakersfield Californian­­­­­­

Myra Queen Engine Room. John Turner Family Collection

March 16, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: The installation of machinery completed. Will start sinking on the Myra Queen shaft tomorrow.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 18, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Ore in shaft looking good; machinery working splendidly.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 21, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Shaft down another six feet tonight.  Machinery  working excellently. Ore  looking great.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 22, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Shaft changing from oxidized to sulphide zone.  This means ore soon.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 24, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Hoisted 22 tons of much today.  Shaft going down rapidly.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 1, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Eight foot vein came in northwest corner of shaft.  Full of Mineral.  Assay tomorrow.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 3, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Sample taken across vein.  Assay $26.15 per ton.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 5, 1922: “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Ore looking exceptionally good.  Starting another shift tonight.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 7, 1922:  “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Struck sulphides today.  Ore looking great.  Depth 110 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 11, 1922: “A COPY OF TELEGRAM RECEIVED READS AS FOLLOWS: Sample from shaft bottom assays twenty-eight dollars and twelve cents.  Everything going good.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 12, 1922: “Captain Hassel, a mining engineer of international note who was in South Africa with Cecil Rhodes is in town.  Superintendent G. A. Hill of the Myra Queen  property here was also associated with Rhodes in South Africa.

June 12, 1922: “It is announced that Myra Queen will renew operations very soon, under an entirely new administration, and general reorganization.  This property will undoubtedly profit by the experience of North Rand, and do a lot of surface prospecting, in order to get at a better knowledge of a great vein system, and thus be in a position to have as nearly actual knowledge as possible what to expect at depth.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 26, 1923:  “Judgment by default for $14,204 in favor of the National Bank of Bakersfield was ordered today by Judge J. W. Mahon, in Superior court No. 1 against Myra Queen Mines, a corporation, the judgment including attorney’s fees of $500 and interest a 7 per cent.  Action was based on failure to satisfy claims on promissory notes amounting to more than $13,000.  The plaintiff was represented by Attorneys Clafin & Lanbert.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 17, 1923:  “ASSESSMENT NOTICE – Myra Queen Mines, a Corporation.—

Location of principal place of business, Bakersfield, California.

Location of works, Rand Mining District, near Johannesburg, San Bernardino, County, California

NOTICE IS HEREBY given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on the 7th day of February, 1923, an assessment, (No. 1 ) of one cent per share was levied upon the capital stock of Myra Queen Mines, a Corporation, payable immediately in lawful money of the United States, to the Secretary of said Corporation, No.  1517    20th-st. Bakersfield, California.

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 20th day of March, 1923, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless payment is made before, will be sold on Wednesday the 18th day of April, 1923, to pay the delinquent assessments, together with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale.

By Order of the Board of Directors

E. S. St. Clair

Office 1517, 20th-st.  Bakersfield, Cal.

Feb.  17, 24 March 3, 10, 17,  1923.

Bakersfield Californian

March 30, 1923: (Editors Note.  A notice was ran in the Bakersfield Californian notifying forty some stock holders that due to their failure to pay the assessment that “so many shares of each parcel of such stock as may be necessary, will be sold at public auction at the office of the Company 1517 Twentieth Street, Bakersfield, California, on the 18th day of April, 1923, at 10 o’clock, A. M. of said day, to pay the delinquent assessments thereon, together with the advertising and expenses of sale.

Many notable men of both Bakersfield and Randsburg who had invested in this stock were listed among the delinquent stock holders.)

November 9, 1923: “Between the Flat Tire and the Big Four, a shaft has been started on the Silver Queen group.  This group is owned and operated by the Randsburg Associated Mines, a new corporation that has been formed to operate in the silver field.  They include the North Rand and  Myra Queen holdings.  Active operations will again put some life in the north end field.´ –Bakersfield Californian

December 22, 1923: “ONE ANGEL CITY ENTHUSIAST started for here in his automobile, driving all night in freezing weather, to obtain reservations on a block of stock in the Randsburg Associated mines, only to find on his arrival that the company’s offices are located in Los Angeles.  After a hasty breakfast, the disappointed seeker of wealth started the long trip with a determination to get that stock if it was to be had.”—Bakersfield Californian

Aerial Photo Of Red Mountain. This Photo is from the Wortley mining collection of the Rand Desert Museum. Wortley acquired Associated Mines property in the late I920's. In the collection of photos acqiured in the Wortley Collection was several photos identifed as Associated Miines photos. While ths photo does not state that it is from Associated Mines, we belive that it may well be one of the photos mentioned in the December1923 newspaper article

December 06, 1923: “FLYERS TAKE PICTURES OVER RAND DISTRICT—Randsburg, Dec. 6. – Flying from Long Beach in less than two hours, Earl Dougherty drove his Blue Bird airplane to a stop here yesterday and besides the Pilot, Don S. Deming, mechanic; P. J. Clark, photographer, and Roy Reis E. P. M., La Provost alighted.  The air party came here at the bequest of the Randsburg Associated Mines, and W. J. Quackenbush.  The party, which included newspaper writers and photographers, secured some excellent material for articles and illustrations which will be used to advertise the great gold and silver center of California .Dougherty in the afternoon gave an exhibition of flying and Scout Smith paraded his famous prospecting burros through the streets all “dolled up” in their desert regalia.”—Bakersfield Californian

Randsburg Associated Mines Inc. Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

January 10, 1924: “OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS –Randsburg, Jan. 10 – Officers and Directors of the Randsburg Associated Mines Inc., recently organized are: J. S. Tremayne, president; C. L. Larzelere, secretary; O. R. Hammeras, treasurer, and J. Baumgartner, director.  It is a million dollar capitalization of par value of shares at 10 cents.—Bakersfield Californian

January 28, 1924: “THE OWNERS are now putting the finishing touches on the hoist house and other buildings over at the Silver Queen.”—Bakersfield Californian

Associated Mines Co. Silver Queen Mine. Wortley Mining Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

January 28, 1924: “THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINE people were in hopes to have had everything moving before now.”—Bakersfield Californian

February 19, 1924: “ANOTHER TRANSACTION wherein the Randsburg Associated Mines have purchased a one-half interest in the Truman group, adjoining their Silver Queen group, was made this week.”—Bakersfield Californian

February 29, 1924: “PASSING BY THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED mines shaft on the Silver Queen, the power company’s gang was noticeable in its hurry-up way of installing the motors and getting the wires in order for the immediate connections.  Juice will be turned on this week.”—Bakersfield Californian March 5, 1924: “AS PROMISED, the actual signal to drop the bucket was given by Superintendent Mat Weidenfenner, for the Sunday day shift on the Silver Queen shaft of the Randsburg Associated Mines.  All of the machinery has had a good tryout and the buildings are convenient with plenty of material and supplies in store.  When the limit of the juice is extended this outfit will add to its payroll, both on this and other points.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 5, 1924: “SEVEN CARLOADS of mining timbers and lumber shipped via the Santa Fe system to the General Supply Company, is a good indication of active operations in the Rand.  Three of the carloads have specially picked lumber for the Randsburg Associated Mines.”—Bakersfield Californian

April 22, 1924:  “THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINES are doing a lot of development on the North Rand and Myra Queen groups in the north field. –Bakersfield Californian

May 31, 1924:  “THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINES shaft on the Silver Queen is down 350 feet.  The Silver Queens neighbor, the Flat Tire, is sinking in better formation and is now down 620 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 10, 1924: “THREE TRUCKS brought in capacity loads of lumber and mining timbers for the Randsburg Associated mines last Thursday from San Pedro harbor. –Bakersfield Californian

July 25, 1924:  “NORTH OF THE SANTA FE, both the Flat Tire and the Silver Queen shafts are down to the 600-foot level.” –Bakersfield Californian

July 26, 1924:  “A LARGE DELEGATION FROM LONG BEACH came up last Wednesday morning to see for themselves the workings of the shaft now down 600 feet on the Silver Queen claim, owned and controlled by the Randsburg Associated Mines. The principal item was the change in the formation before the 600-foot depth was made, the change from red paint rock to brown, and now the minerals are in the lighter or grey formation.  This is a very favorable change that came in the several producing shafts in the silver zone.  Without any question the plant on the Silver Queen will compare with any of the active operators.  With plenty of mining timbers, lumber, material and supplies of all kinds ahead, there is little wonder that this shaft is making good on its traveling down.  In addition it might be well to state that the muck from below is being spread so that ere long they will have a site for their lumber and iron yard.  All of which gives the southern visitor a keen appreciation of system. “–Bakersfield Californian

August 1, 1924:  “REPORT DEVELOPMENTS IN RAND SILVER ZONE.—Owing to the limit placed on power, the Santa Fe and the Silver Queen managements are only working two shifts, the latter shaft workers are confident of taking the lead in sinking with the next 20 days.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 22, 1924:  “NORTH OF THE TWO MENTIONED companies lie the Flat Tire and Silver Queen shafts, both outfits in the hands of busy Long Beach oil operators, and like the average seeker after the black gold, these men have placed their money on the judgment of their engineers and geologists.  Both shifts of the Silver Queen are manned with as snappy a bunch of old-timers as ever hit the trail.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 22, 1924:  “The Randsburg Associated Mines are doing a lot of development on the North Rand and Myra Queen groups in the north field.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 17, 1924:  “Ernie Blank, one of the principal owners of the Coyote mine, was a midweek visitor to Randsburg.  He mentioned that he has disposed of his one half interest n the Ben Trumen group to the Randsburg Associated  Mines.  This Association is now sinking two shafts, one on the Silver Queen,  nearing the  900 feet depth and the other on the Myra Queen in the north end  of the field and is down 300 feet.  Mention has been made as to the Silver Queen shaft being the best finished in the district.  With the installation of a new 111 horse power motor, a 14 by 14 compressor, tool sharpener, sawmill, and minor machinery, it will be second to none in equipment.  Then the new buildings to cover most of the new machinery are being rushed.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 22, 1924: “OUT IN THE NORTH END OF THE FIELD of the field, good looking rock touched with the antimony and white iron is coming in at the 350 foot depth in the Myra Queen shaft, and at the bottom of a 900-foot shaft, the Silver Queen is in formation that may soon be called schist, all of which make the local development very interesting.” –Bakersfield Californian

Engine House Silver Queen Mine of the Randsburg Associated Mines Co. John Turner Family Collection

October 22, 1924: “THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINES HAVE all of the shipment of machinery on hand and installed under the supervision of the factory expert.  The 100-horsepower motor and the 14 by 14 compressor, as well as the tool sharpener and the saw, were hitting ‘em on high.  The Randsburg Associated Mines, next to the California Rand Silver, Inc., have the choicest groups and locations in the northern part of the silver zone.  Only last week they purchased from Ernie Blanck, of the old Coyote mine, the remaining one-half interest in the Truman group, a nicely located group, a nicely located parcel of ground. –Bakersfield Californian

November 7, 1924:  “MYRA QUEEN PROGRESSING – Randsburg, Nov. 7.—Prospects for bringing in the white metal ore in the Myra Queen shaft, in the north field are more encouraging as they continue down.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 8, 1924:  “RICH MINERAL FIND REPORTED –High Grade Ore Brought to Surface in Vicinity of Randsburg Property.  An important strike has been made on the Myra Queen property, according to J. E. Portor, who arrived in Bakersfield from the mining district yesterday.  Information given out by resident Manager Hill, is to the effect that a two-foot vein of ore, encountered on the 900-foot level, shows values of $1,100 in silver and gold.  The property is owned by the Randsburg Associated Mines Company, which only recently resumed development operations.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 29, 1924: “PASSING BY THE Randsburg Associated Mines shaft on the Silver Queen, the power company’s gang was noticeable in its hurry-up way of installing the motors and getting the wires in order for immediate connections.  Juice will be turned on this week.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE RANDSBURG ASSOCIATED MINING COMPANY hold four groups of claims namely the North Rand, Myra Queen Groups, (240 acres north of Red Mountain; the Silver Queen, composed of three fractional claims lying between the Flat Tire and Big Four shafts; and the Commonwealth Group of two claims, lying a half mile to the northeast of the Silver Queen Group.

Developments on the North Rand and Myra Queen groups include a 400 foot incline shaft, a 168-foot vertical shaft, and approximately 1400 feet of drifts and crosscuts, besides a number of shallow shafts and tunnels. No work, other than that required by law has been done on the Commonwealth Group.

Randsburg Associated Mines Co Claim Map. Wortley Mining Company Collection of the Rand Desert Museum.

A new shaft located about midway between the Big Four and Flat Tire shafts was started on the Silver Queen Group late in 1923.  In January, 1924, this shaft was down 40 feet.  It is vertical and has 1 ½ compartments.  Probably 1000 feet of the Rosamond formation must be penetrated before the shaft will enter the Quartz monzonite zone.” –Hulin

July 8, 1925:  “USING DIAMOND DRILL—Randsburg Associated Mines Company, Randsburg, Kern County, is diamond drilling from the Bottom of the Silver Queen 1080-foot shaft.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 26, 1925:  LEGAL NOTICES — No. 18581 Dept. 3—NOTICE OF FILING PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION, AND OF DATE FIXING TIME FOR HEARING SAME.

In the Superior Court of the State of California, in and for the County of Kern.

In the matter of the Application of Myra Queen Mines, a corporation, for dissolution of said corporation.

Myra Queen Mines, a domestic corporation, having filed in the above entitled Court its application for dissolution, which said application was presented to the above named Court, and which said Court has made the Order fixing Monday, the 21st day of December, 1925, at the hour of 10 o’clock a. m. in Department 2 of the above entitled court, as the time and place of hearing said application, and which said order further directed that the Clerk of said Court give thirty (30) days’ notice of the same by publication of this notice once a week during said  period in the Bakersfield  Californian, a newspaper of general circulation published in the City of Bakersfield , County of Kern, State of California.

Now Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given that the said application has been filed, and that the same will be heard at the time and place specified above, and that at any time before the expiration of the time of publication, towit: December 21, 1925, any person may file his objections to said application.

In Witness Whereof,  F. E. Smith, County Clerk and ex-Officio of the Superior Court of said County has hereunto set his hand and affixed his bond and affixed the Seal of said Court, this 18th day of November, 1925.

(seal)                                                                                                    F. E. SMITH

County Clerk and ex- Officio Clerk of Superior Court

Nov. 19-26,  Dec.  2-10-17

April 5, 1926:  “ANNOUNCEMENT WAS MADE that Ed and John Herkelrath last night sold 20 acres located 200 feet from the main strike (Kramer Hills) to the Randsburg Associated Mines Company for $22,000.  The company will move machinery from the Myra Queen mine at Randsburg.” –Bakersfield Californian

SILVER BASIN

CHRONOLOGY

February 13, 1923:  “A SMALL HOIST has been secured for the Silver Basin and sinking has been resumed.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 13, 1923: “AT THE SILVER BASIN PROPERTY work has been resumed on the shaft which follows the rich pay shoot.  General Manager Leonard Loehr reports that the shaft is now down 75 feet and that another stringer of ore has been cut which it is expected will, within a few feet, join the main ore body.  Arrangements are now being made to prospect the Black Hawk vein, which is exposed for more than 2,000 feet on the Silver Basin holdings. A boarding hall s soon to be erected to take care of the rapidly increasing force.” –Bakersfield Californian

July 24, 1923:  “GOLD STRIKE STIRS RANDSBURG PEOPLE—Silver Basin Mine Yields Up Promising Vein of Yellow  Metal –Randsburg, July 24 –Withholding an official announcement of the discovery until sufficient exploration work has been done to establish the extent and richness  of the deposit, directors of the Silver Basin Mining Company today authorized the report that a vein of  ore, approximately three foot wide, has been discovered on their property carrying gold values ranging in value from $100 to $400 per ton.  The original discovery was made several weeks ago when pannings from an outcrop on the surface showed large quantities of free milling coarse gold.

Values at this point were confined to a vein less than a foot in width but as the work of sinking on the vein continues the ore body widened and values became more consistent and or higher average per ton.

STIRS DISTRICT—News of the strike, by far the most sensational in the Rand district since the famous  California Rand Silver was discovered four years ago, soon leaked out and a procession of automobile carrying miners and  prospectors from  the adjoining camps was headed toward the Silver Basin property.  Credulous miners were told to take their own samples and do their own panning, which in the majority of cases was done, with the result that they returned to camp satisfied that another strike of real importance had been made.

The Silver Basin holdings are located adjacent to the Black Hawk property which has since its operation yielded up $350,000 of the yellow metal and with large bodies of ore now blocked out ready for the mill.  The famous St. Elmo, another heavy producer, leys just south and east of the Silver Basin thus placing the latter property between two  of the districts ‘s most sensational producers of gold.

KERN MEN INTERESTED—Headed by Kent Knowlton as president all of the outstanding stock is owned by Kern County men.  President Knowlton is authority of the statement that due to the richness of the deposit at the surface making it possible to carry o development work with profits from the ore extracted, only a limited block of the stock, if any, will be placed on the market, thus to be distributed among present shareholders.

The property is under the direct supervision of Leonard Laehr, noted among mining men as one of the most efficient engineers and mine directors of the west.  Laehr with a reputation for conservatism that is has taken forty years to build, freely predicts that the Silver Basin discovery will prove to be one of the big mines of the state and that the yield of precious metal from its unexplored depths will make mining history for the famous Rand district.

COMPANY OFFICERS—Officers and directors of the company are: Kent Knowlton, president; Roy Wood, vice-president; Leonard Laehr, secretary and treasurer; Rollin Laird, legal counsel.

Among the prominent shareholders are: L. C. Ross, Bob McCutenson, Kelly Russell, Felix Galtes, George Whitaker, W. S. Badger, J. W. Brockman, Frank Livington, Lyman Lowell, Frank Feathers, James McGuire, Mel P. Smith, Emmett Hayes, Harold Pomeroy, George Parish, E. W. Dean, E. S. Gregory, Charles Knowlton, Charles Hahn.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 3, 1923: “LURE OF GOLD BRINGS RUSH BACK TO RANDSBURG DISTRICT—Twenty five Automobiles Visit Silver Basin in one day.—Randsburg, Aug. 3—The lure of gold is bringing them back.  They are coming singly and in flivver loads, all attracted by the discovery of high-grade ore on the Silver Basin property which has produced a sensation in mining circles second only to the discovery of the justly famous California Rand Silver mine more than four years ago.  On one day this week automobile loads of interested mining men and prospectors visited the Silver Basin property where they were invited by Manager Loehr to take their own samples, do their own panning and form their own opinion. “Boys, we have been walking right over another  big one, as big perhaps as the Kelly, for years and years, which shows that this district has not yet been thoroughly prospected,: was the comment of one veteran prospector after he has taken a number of samples and had noted the length of the ore shoot which is daily increased.  Exploration work on the surface which consists principally of trenching shows the ore body carrying high-grade to be more than 100 feet long and its extent is being increased as fast as a small crew of men can open it up.  Values on the surface continue to run from $100 to $500 a ton and the width of the ore body continues to increase with depth.

PROSPECTED BEFORE—When James Murray, veteran prospector, chipped off the small specimens of ore from the ledge that now bears his name he was standing in precisely the same spot that had been prospected by numbers of men in quest of gold, silver and tungsten.  In fact the trench which exposed the rich ledge had been made at some past time by some ambitious prospector who failed to find the values after he had reached the ledge.  It was from the side of this shallow trench that Murray took his sample pannings which showed him that the vein carried values of better than $100 in gold within six inches of the surface.  The ore deposit at this point was, however, only from two to three inches in width which perhaps accounts for the fact that it had been overlooked by so many prospectors in the years gone by.

DEVELOPMENT WORK—Work of developing the discovery continues as rapidly as a small crew of workmen can expose the vein.  The length of the ore body on the surface is one of the first things Manager Loehr has decided to determine.  When he has completed this work the point at which the shaft will be sunk will be decided upon, machinery installed and sinking directly upon the vein will be instituted. “We have decided to proceed slowly with the first development work,” stated President Knowlton.  “We have adopted a policy of conservatism which we will follow to the letter and at the proper time the necessary mining and mill machinery will be installed.  We also have a showing of an immense body of milling ore on a parallel vein some three hundred feet distant from the high-grade which we intend to develop as soon as possible.

STIMULANT PROVIDED—With the announcement of the Silver Basin discovery which is located approximately three miles southeast of Randsburg there has been  an influx of prospectors into this immediate region and it is confidently expected that other reports of strikes in that district will soon be in circulation.  In any event the Silver Basin strike has provided a stimulant to gold mining in the camp which has not been equaled since the early days when the Yellow Aster and the Stringer district were giving up their store of the yellow metal. Vice-President Roy Wood, to whom has been delegated the duty of obtaining sufficient finances to successfully conduct the exploration work and install machinery, stated today that the subscription lists are rapidly being filled up and that in most instances shareholders were increasing their holdings.  No new subscriptions have thus far been asked for but a steady stream of orders for more stock continue to pour into the Randsburg office of the company.  Local subscriptions are also quite heavy.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 23, 1923:  “SILVER BASIN IS FORGING AHEAD –Buildings Going Up Fast at Point of Recent Strike in Rand.  —  Randsburg, Calif., Aug. 23.—Three weeks  ago a desolate, deserted hillside is a veritable beehive of activity with crews of carpenters and masons erecting office buildings, engine room, change  rooms for the miners and other buildings necessary for the successful operation of a mine.  This is the record being written by the Silver Basin Mining Company, where a sensational strike of high-grade gold ore was recently made.

At a point where the original discovery was made a shaft was sunk to a depth of 20 feet on the ore body and the values were found to be stronger as depth was acquired.  General Manager Leonard Laehr then began work on shaft No. 2, a distance of 90 feet from shaft No. 1 where the vein was again encountered and where the ore body is being followed and is found to widen with depth.  This latter haft will be the main working shaft if present development plans are followed.  The ore shoot of high grade values has now been from for a distance of 120 feet on the surface and to depth of from 20 to 40 feet, thus assuring, according to mining men an extensive ore body of high grade values.

TWO CREWS SINKING—Two crews are not engaged in sinking shaft No. 2 and the third shift will be added as soon as power and machinery, which has been ordered has been installed.  The plant is to be electrically equipped and will be of sufficient capacity to sink to deep levels.  Another plan of development is to be launched within a few days according to Manager Laehr when the Blackhawk vein, which parallels the Murray of high grade for a distance of 2750 feet, will be carefully explored.  Surface samples taken from distant points on this ledge show values in both gold and silver and Laehr is of the opinion that they will increase in value with depth.

MININUM EXPENSE—Ideally located, with advantages even greater than the famous “Big Silver,” the Silver Basin mine is being opened up with a minimum of expense.  A high voltage power line crosses the property within 300 feet of the shaft.  The Randsburg water company has a battery of galvanized tanks located on  a hill less than a thousand feet distant, the highway connecting Randsburg with the outside world is but 1500 feet distant, while the Santa Fe Railroad is within less than a half mile.

Another unique feature according to the claims of the owners is the fact that as this time the value of ore already exposed is greater than the amount of stock that has been sold or will be sold, due to the slight expense required to fully open up the mine.

President Kent Knowlton and vice president Roy Wood are in Los Angeles this week speeding delivery on machinery and equipment so that no delay may be encountered in its installation.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 30, 1923: “COMPANY DISPOSES OF RANDSBURG PROPERTY—Randsburg, Aug. 30. –For and in consideration  of a cash payment in the four figures, the Ben Hur Divide Mining Company has disposed of all of the machinery, buildings, ventilating and air pipe, trackage and in fact, everything movable on top, to the Silver Basin Mining Company of Randsburg.  The latter company has a promising gold prospect and are now about ready to decide at which site they will sink their main and permanent shaft.  In the meantime, they will start the preliminary work of laying the foundation for complete electrical equipment, water, power and telephone lines.  The Silver Basin ground adjoins the Black Hawk holdings, in the proven gold district.”—Bakersfield Californian

September 7, 1923:  “SILVER BASIN ABOUT READY TO COMMENCE ORE SHIPMENTS –Actual Mining Will Begin as Soon as Machinery Is in Place. –Randsburg, Calif, Sept. 7—With an incline shaft sunk to a depth of 60 feet at one point and another shaft attaining a depth of 40 feet at a point 100 feet distant, both of them being on the high grade ledge.  General Manager Leonard Laehr of the Silver Basin Mining Company announced today that the actual mining and shipping of ore to the smelter could be started with the installation of machinery that is now being put in place.  “From the amount of ore we now have in sight” stated manager Laehr, “we would be justified in starting shipments to the smelter but conditions are such that we can continue are such that we can continue our work of development with less expense by leaving the ore bodies untouched for a while and continuing the work of sinking on the ledge.

VEIN IS WIDENING—“We find in  the deepest shaft that the vein carrying values that assay n gold from $40 to $60 a ton is gradually widening, having now attained a width of more than two feet, and becoming richer with depth.  Naturally we are anxious to follow the trend of this vein to see just how wide and rich it will become with greater depth.

Work of prospecting and developing the Black Hawk vein which parallels the ore shoot where the shafts are being sunk, for a distance of 2,350 feet, will be started in a few days, according to Laehr, who declared that excellent showings of milling ore had been found at intervals over the entire area.  Shafts will be sunk at intervals on the ore body until its extent is proven.

HALT STOCK SALES—Roy Wood, vice-president and acting fiscal agent for the company, is authority for the statement that requests for stock reservations  are continuing to come in from distant points as well as Kern county and that the sale of shares will perhaps be halted when the directors hold their next meeting.  “Practically all of our stock has been subscribed by the original unit holders,” stated Wood.  “We now have enough money in the treasury to  prosecute development work and pay for our plant and equipment so there is a growing  feeling  among the shareholders that the sale of stock should stop and we are inclined to accede to their  wishes.” Concluded the official.

Sunday and Monday, Labor Day, were visitors’ day at the scene of this latest gold discovery, more than 50 automobiles, passenger laden, calling at the property.  So frequent did the visitors become that President Kent Knowlton was finally called in to act as a reception committee and instructor in properly panning gold.

The complete plant of the Ben Hur Divide Mining company, one of the most modern in the district has been purchased by the Silver Basin company and is now being installed as rapidly as possible on the latter’s ground.  “With a few additions to the equipment we have purchased from the Ben Hur,” stated President Knowlton, “we expect to have the best equipped plant for the economical mining of ore in the entire district.”

Within the space of ten days there has been erected an office building, superintendent’s quarters,  blacksmith shop, change room for the miners, hoist and compressor rooms and other buildings required to  house the machinery.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 13, 1923:  “THE SILVER BASIN is nearly finished with installing its complete operating plant to turn on the power.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 4, 1923: “SILVER BASIN—At the Silver Basin property, owned in most part by Kern County and Los Angeles shareholders, and which came into recent prominence by reason of the discovery of a rich gold ledge, the work of installing the machinery has been completed.  The principal work now being done is in enlarging the incline shaft which follows the ore body down to make it conform to standard regulations.  This work has now progressed to a point 50 feet below the surface and according to President Kent Knowlton the bottom of the old shaft will have been reached within a few days when the work of following the pay shoot to a greater depth will be continued.  While enlarging the shaft another stringer was cut on the foot wall with indications according to Manager Leonard Loehr, that it will join the main ore body at depth.”—Bakersfield Californian

October 13, 1923: “AT THE SILVER BASIN PROPERTY work has been resumed on the shaft which follows the rich pay shoot.  General Manager Leonard Loehr reports that the shaft is now down 75 feet and that another stringer of ore has been cut which it is expected will, within a few feet, join the main ore body.  Arrangements are now being made to prospect the Black Hawk vein, which is exposed for more than 2,000 feet on the Silver Basin holdings.  A boarding hall is soon to be erected to take care of the rapidly increasing forces.”—Bakersfield Californian

October 18, 1923:  “AT THE SILVER BASIN property two shifts of miners are engaged in sinking an incline shaft which follows the rich pay shoot and also in blocking out ore.  This company will soon join the producing class.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 6, 1923:  “SILVER BASINE IS SHOOTING DOWN and trying to catch the Silver King vein.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 8, 1923:  “SILVER BASIN—at the Silver Basin property the incline shaft has now reached a depth of 100 feet and drifting has been started.  Manger Leonard Laehr expect to pick up the rich pay shoot now at any time and when he does it is expected that another strike of importance will be made.”—Bakersfield Californian

December 25, 1923: “DEVELOPMENT WORK is still going on with the Silver Basin Company, on the 100 foot level; Supt. Loehr states that the showings are very encouraging.”  Bakersfield Californian

October 7, 1924:  “A VISIT TO THE SILVER BASIN found Kent S. Knowlton and Leonard Laehr working on a rich streak  of gold ore and pannings run along the bottom edge  of the gold pan for inches.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE SILVER BASIN PROPERTY, comprising five claims totaling about 60 acres lies to the southeast of the Black Hawk Mine.  The property is owned by the Silver Basin Mining Company, Inc.  A rich gold discovery was made on the property July 9, 1923, a vein being found which panned coarse gold and gave assays varying from $81.00 to $432.00 per ton across a width of two feet. Equipment was installed and an incline shaft 100 feet deep sunk along the vein.  The vein in depth rapidly degenerated into a mere stringer, which, however continued to pan gold.  About 500 feet of horizontal work has been carried on without, as yet, any new discoveries having been made.” –Hulin

December 23, 1925:  “SILVER BASIN TO COMMENCE DEEP MINING NEW YEAR –“Deep mining will prove up greater values in gold and silver than any heretofore obtained” said Leonard Laehr, manager of the Silver Basin group of claims in the Rand mining district, while in the city at a director’s meeting held yesterday.  He expressed great confidence in the future of mining development in the territory tributary to this city and announced that his company has been fully financed to undertake extensive development work.

Plans have been completed for the beginning of work upon the Silver Basin mine immediately after the first of the year.  Officers of the company are R. L. McCutcheon, president and Rollin Laird, secretary, Bakersfield; R. E. Wood, Randsburg, vice president; Leonard Laehr, Randsburg, Managing Director; Allan Klinguswalth, Long Basset, and L. Brewering Los Angeles directors.  Kent Knowlton formerly of this city is a heavy stockholder.

IS WELL EQUIPPED –The Silver Basin property is fully equipped with electric power, a 50 hp hoist and a large  compressor and it is located adjacent to the famous Black Hawk, one of the early gold  producers that is again being opened up on an extensive scale by eastern owners.  In (recent) operations the Black Hawk has cut into a four-foot vein showing  good silver values on the west end lines adjacent to the Silver Basin property.

“Our first plan will be get hear on a gold vein, which we have opened up, and which we propose to make a producer.  The ore runs from $50 to $75 a ton in gold.  From less than 3 tons of ore, we obtained 11 ounces of gold.” Stated Mr. Laehr

“We will then sink a deep shaft for silver values.” he continued, “the development is being financed in Long Beach, and it is said that $100,000 is assured by the present campaign.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 1, 1926:  “A PATHO NEWS CAMERA and several newspaper staff photographers were at the strike (Kramer Hills) today.  Directors of the Silver Basin Mining Company at Randsburg were at the strike today and acquired a lease for their company from the Herkelraths and a number of individual leases were secured.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

SILVER BELL / SILVER BELLE

CHRONOLOGY

Silver Belle Mining Company Stock Certifcate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

May 10, 1922:  “HOMER JOHNSTONE SECURES OPTION ON SILVER BELLE CLAIM.—By the terms of a settlement just reported, the Silver Belle mining claim, adjoining the California Rand Silver, or, as it is called, the “Big Silver” mine at Randsburg and directly between the “Big Silver” and the Errecart strike, has been tied up under option by Homer Johnstone, formerly a well-known Bakersfield attorney.

The transaction has created much interest among mining men and has already resulted n considerable gain to Mr. Johnstone and his associates, because of the fact that their option was obtained but a day or so before the sensational strike on the Mizpah Montana, close by.

The Silver Belle is one of the last of the undeveloped properties in the heart of the so-called proven zone at Randsburg, and would have been exploited at the commencement of the boom n that vicinity but for the fact that it was tied up in a legal tangle over boundary lines which has now been settled by a compromise between all the parties concerned.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 12, 1922:  “NEW MINING CO. IS FORMED HERE—Plan to develop Silver Belle Adjoining the California Rand.—A new Randsburg mining company with Bakersfield as the headquarters, was launched yesterday when a group of local business men organized a temporary association preliminary to incorporation, to be known as the Silver Belle Mining Company, for the purpose of developing the property by that name which adjoins the California Rand Silver, Incorporated, or “Big Silver” mine at Randsburg.

The Silver Belle property has been the storm center over a great deal of threatened litigation, because of its location in the heart of the so-called proven silver-zone, but through the efforts of its present owners a compromise has been effected and an exchange of agreements and deeds made between the contending parties, with the result that it’s title is now considered among the best in the district.

It is located just a few hundred feet from the shaft of the “Big Silver,” which has already produced millions, and between it and toward the Mizpah Montana and Errecart properties in which rich ore has lately been found.

The new company has taken for offices, the mezzanine floor of the Union Stage depot at Eighteenth and Chester, and has commenced an active campaign with Homer Johnstonn, ex Bakersfield attorney, as financial manager, and M. R. Solomon of the American Jewelry Company and J. L. Bruce of the Bruce garage associated with him.

J. Kelly Russell, cashier at the National Bank of Bakersfield is temporary trustee.  Requests for reservations in this subscription fund began to pour into the offices before they were fairly established and a large group of Kern county business men including a number prominently identified with other projects in the Rand district will go to Randsburg Sunday morning to complete organization of the new company.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 13, 1922: “TO VISIT MINING PROPERTY AT RAND—Many Will Make Trip to Silver Belle Tomorrow for Inspection—One of the most enthusiastic of the various groups that have gone into the Randsburg mining district will leave Bakersfield tomorrow morning for an inspection of their property.  This is the association of Kern county business men who have taken up an option and are acquiring the Silver Belle property adjoining the California Rand Silver.

Inquiries for information as to the matter of investing in this property are being received in great numbers at the company’s offices, opened day before yesterday, on the mezzanine floor of the union stage depot building, at Eighteenth and Chester.   Many of these inquiries are coming from men working in the mines at Randsburg who have first-hand knowledge of the property.

ENGINEER VISITS OFFICE –Among the Randsburg visitors who called at the company’s offices this morning was T. L. Lane, a mining engineer of wide reputation who is also at the present time president of the Randsburg chamber of commerce.  Lane revealed the information that someone had last year secured an assay of the surface of the Silver Belle property that ran $900 a ton in gold.  Lane says this assay was taken from a very small specimen, but that values of this kind found on the surface indicate what may be expected of the property when depth is reached and the sliver bearing ore is found in quantity.

PRELIMINARY MONEY SUBSCRIBED—According to Homer Johnstone, ex Bakersfield attorney, who is managing the financing of the new enterprise, the entire preliminary money needed has been subscribed and will be paid in tomorrow and Monday.  This, however includes a few reservations made for San Francisco and Los Angeles people, and as it is his intention to close the proposition at one and het the quickest action on its development that can be had, these reservations will be cancelled unless the money is received by Monday evening.  Anyone desirous of investigating the proposition will be given an opportunity of taking up any of these unpaid reservations and will be provided with auto accommodations for the trip to Randsburg tomorrow by arranging for same at the company’s offices this afternoon. “–Bakersfield Californian

May 15, 1922:  “BURGE ENTHUSIASTIC OVER RAND CLAIMS –A large number of Kern county people visited Randsburg yesterday for the purpose of inspecting the property of the Silver Belle Mining Company adjoining the California Rand Silver or “Big Silver” mine.  Without exception each one of the visitors yesterday invested in the new enterprise among the heaviest being Ed Burge, well known Kern county and Los Angeles capitalist, who after looking over the location of the new property and adjoining claims that have lately uncovered rich ore, expressed himself enthusiastically about the prospects for developing one of the big mines of the district on the Silver Belle property.

Another enthusiast was E. P. Edwards, drilling contractor of the west side oil fields and one of the owners of the E. and M. Oil Company.  Among others were N. R. Solomon of the American Jewelry company, Bakersfield; T. A. Pettit, Joe Herbert and Mr. Ferry of Taft, and a considerable aggregation from Bakersfield.

The new organization named a board of directors at yesterday’s meeting.  Ed Burge, N. R. Solomon,   E. P. Edwards, J.L. Bruce and Homer Johnstone were chosen as permanent directors for the corporation now being formed.

Offices have been opened at the Union Stage Depot building, 18th and Chester.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 26, 1922: “DEEDS RECORDED IN SILVER BELLE MINE COMPROMISE Steps Will be Taken at Once to Develop Important Rand Holdings—A number of deals were placed at record today to the county recorder’s office conveying to J. Kelly Russell as trustee, the mining property at Randsburg being incorporated under the name of the Silver Belle Mining Company.

This is the property that has recently obtained title by a compromise executed between all of the interested parties, among which was the California Rand Silver.  The deeds were from T. L. Reyes, Edward Herkelrath, W. H. Price, Fred J. Miller, Gertrude Royal, E. P. Hoisington, H. C. Ellis, Frank Harris, L. C. Osborne, J. L. Osborne, A. K. Johnson, Lena Johanson, H. C. Kaise, and others.

The holdings of the company consist of approximately 68 acres in the Rand district, a portion of which is but a short distance from the “Big Silver” shaft and in the general direction of the Mizpah and Errecart strikes.

The Ben Hur shaft which was started last week is less than a hundred feet from the Silver Belle holdings and the members of the new company were much enthused at the news received today that the Ben Hur struck high grade gold and silver values in the first 18 feet of their shaft.

The Silver Belle has opened offices in the Union Stage Depot Building and is making application to the Corporation Commissioner for permission to sell stock for developing the property.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 16, 1922:  “YUKON SPIRIT LIVES AGAIN IN BATTLE FOR RANDSBURG CLAIM—Obtain Clear Title to Silver Belle After Conflict Settled.  Randsburg, June 16. –The dangers and hardships that made up the romantic story of the Alaska gold rush have passed, but the fight to obtain mining claims of great potential value is as bitter and ruthless now as in the days of “White Horse Pass” with its scenes of death on the one hand and untold wealth on the other.

An echo of those stirring days of ’98 is found in the story of the acquisition by local men of the Silver Belle claim next to the famous “Big Silver” at Randsburg.

CENTER OF LITIGATION—Staked out in the first rush at the time of the original discovery of silver in that district in the summer of 1918, t remained a center of litigation with its adjoining neighbor, the “Big Silver,” whose shafts from which millions have been produced, are located a stones’ throw away, until shortly before April 25 of this year.  This litigation was then compromised by mutual exchanges of deeds between the conflicting parties.

The Silver Belle property at that time had a number of recognized owners and because of a difference of opinion over its operation they decided to sell, and fixed a price deemed reasonable at that time.  An option for 10 days was given to a Randsburg broker, and then just as everything was moving smoothly came another rumpus caused by the sensational discoveries of silver on the Errecart and Mizpah-Montana properties, proving the Silver Belle claim to be completely encircled with rich ore, and the structure such that only by a freak of nature will the Silver Belle fail to hit these deposits.  These new strikes increased the value of the Silver Belle claims many times, and the former owners backed up and began, to search for a loophole in their contract to escape making delivery of the property.

OBTAIN NECESSARY RELEASES—A legal tender in shining gold coin made through the Bank of Italy at Bakersfield, night rides across the desert with survey parties, hurriedly prepared maps and abstracts of title, telegrams to all parts of the state, numerous releases from individuals who had intangible, but nevertheless legal claims upon the property, all came nest and after a period of feverish activity of this sort all the necessary releases and deeds were obtained.

The principal owners of the property of the old school of pioneers of the west and of the type that never fail in an obligation, made their work good and the property passed into the hands of J. Kelly Russell of the National Bank of Bakersfield, as trustee, with perhaps the best, or equally as good, a title as can be found in the district.  The scrutiny of the records by the many lawyers, engineers and interested parties was too intense to permit any technicality to escape, and the very conflict now settled is itself the best guarantee of title.

The owners are losing no time in commencing their development work and are of such caliber and standing that a thorough exploitation of the claim is assured.  Who knows but that it may be the bonanza for which every prospector is in search.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 19, 1922: “DEVELOPMENT WORK AT SILVER BELLE STARTED—Actual development work on the Silver Belle claim adjoining the California Rand Silver incorporated, was started yesterday when officers of the Silver Belle company located the site for the shaft and E. D. Burges, president, made the appointment of T. T. Lane as superintendent of development.

Lane, who is president of the Randsburg Chamber of Commerce, is also an experienced mining engineer, and he promises some record speed in sinking the Silver Belle shaft to the “Pay rock.”

Machinery capable of going to a depth of 1000 feet is being installed and when this gets to working three shifts will be run at the mine.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 20, 1922:  “DEVELOPMENT WORK STARTS AT SILVER BELLE—Extensive plans are being made for the development work at the Silver Belle claim adjoining the California Rand Silver, Inc., and actual work has been started.  T. T. Lane, president of the Randsburg Chamber of Commerce and an experienced mining engineer has been appointed superintendent of development by E. D. Burge, president.

Machinery capable of going to a depth of 1000 feet is being installed and when ready for operation, three shifts will be run at the mine.  The officers of the Silver Belle Co. located the site for the shaft Sunday.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

June 22, 1922: “START SHAFT IN SILVER BELLE MINE—Randsburg, June 22, — The shaft on the Silver Belle property was started yesterday, the contract being given to Sam Homay for the first fifty feet. Timber for the gallows frame and the road to the mine was finished on Tuesday. A five-room guesthouse has been brought over from Atolia and has been fixed for the accommodation of the stockholders when they come out on visits to the mine.  The house will be in charge of Mr. and Mrs. Sharpneck.  Mr. Sharpneck will also act as bookkeeper. From the advantageous position of the Silver Belle, it is confidently expected to show values within 300 feet.  However, the company is equipping with the intention of sinking 1500 feet if necessary to thoroughly develop the ground west of the big dyke. E. D. Burge is president and Mat Solomon of Bakersfield secretary of the company and Thomas Lane is in direct charge of operations. – Bakersfield Californian

June 26, 1922:  “SILVER BELLE CREATING SHARE OF ATTENTION—Officers of the Silver Belle Mining Company were hosts Saturday night to about 35 persons from  Bakersfield and  Los Angeles, who remained at the mine headquarters over night and on Sunday inspected the new shaft and other workings.

E. D. Burge, president; J. Kelly Russell, trustee, and Homer Johnstone acted as the reception committee.

The Silver Belle has been equipped for electricity, the blacksmith shop has been completed and machinery for operation of the mine is being installed.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 29, 1922:  “THE SILVER BELLE IS SINKING FAST, just west of the ‘big silver’ and expects to tap the rich ore soon.” –Bakersfield Californian

July 14, 1922:  “PROGRESS BEING MADE IN SILVER BELLE MINE.—The record progress being made in developing the Silver Belle property which adjoins the California Rand, or “Big Silver” at Randsburg, is attracting attention from all parts of the state.

R. Rosenberg, wholesale mining machine man of Los Angeles, with a large party of business men from that city, accompanied by R. F.  Frazier, a well-known mining engineer of Southern California, spent Monday and Tuesday of this week at Randsburg and became greatly enthused over the Silver Belle possibilities.

On their return to Los Angeles each one of the party, including Frazier, the engineer, made heavy reservations for stock in the Silver Belle Corporation.

This company has just commenced its stock campaign for funds to develop this valuable property, and according to Johnstone, who has charge of the financing of the enterprise, reservations for stock are coming in from a great number of sources.  The Silver Belle was incorporated less than six weeks ago, but already has a shaft down a considerable depth, a five-room house, shops, lumber, steel and a large quantity of equipment on the ground.  A strongly built 40-foot headframe has been erected and machinery has been purchased and is on its way to the mine, sufficiently powerful to sink a shaft to a depth of 1000 feet or more, if necessary.

This development work on the property is being done under the direction of T. T. Lane, a well-known mining engineer of Randsburg, who promises a record for speed and efficiency on the Silver Belle that will be hard to equal.” –Bakersfield Californian

July 15, 1922:  “SEES BIG PROMSE IN SILVER BELLE –Dr. Bruener, Alaskan “Old Timer,” Is Interested in Randsburg—One of the most famous of the “old-timers” in Alaska, Dr. M. W. Bruener the man who conceived and put into execution the construction of the Copper River Railroad, said to afford the basis for the book written by Rex Beach, “The Iron Trail,” is in Kern County and has just returned from Randsburg after several days visit to that camp.

Dr. Bruener is a surgeon by profession, but has been identified for many years with extensive mining interests, and now represents a number of Philadelphia people who were attracted to the Rand district by the phenomenal silver production of that camp during the last several years.

Dr. Bruener made a close study of the entire camp but was particularly interested in the Silver Belle Mining company property adjoining the California Rand.  He is emphatic in his belief that the Silver Belle will develop into one of the big mines of the district and is quoted as saying:

“The location of the Silver Belle property, situated as it is but a stone’s throw from the world’s richest present day silver mine, is itself worthy of notice.  Coupled to this, however, is the Errecart lease, already shipping ore, just to the west, and most favorable showings in both the Ben Hur shaft south, and the Kelly Rand Extension north.  This makes the Silver Belle property surrounded, within a few hundred feet in each direction, with valuable property.  Still another fact is the fine surface showing on the Silver Belle with an exposed ledge carrying high-values of both gold and silver.  You can tell the people of Kern County for me that they are fortunate in having an opportunity to invest in an enterprise of this character, for the Silver Belle is certain to develop into a real mine.”” –Bakersfield Californian

September 3, 1922: “T. T. LANE, SUPERINTENDENT of the Silver Belle Mining Company, has gone north on a business trip to purchase machinery for the Silver Belle mine.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

September 24, 1922:  “CURRENT FOR THE SPLENDID machinery plant on the Silver Belle claim, was made with success Wednesday and the sinking of the shaft has been resumed.  With the closeness of the strike on the Ben Hur, to their workings and the usual mining luck, the Silver Belle should walk into good ore within a reasonable depth.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 23, 1922:  “SILVER BELLE HEADS INSPECTING PROPERTY –Randsburg, Sept. 22. –E. D. Burge, N. H. Solomon and Homer Johnstone of the Silver Belle Mining Company came up from Bakersfield today to inspect the new machinery just installed on that property.

The equipment is the best that could be procured and under the painstaking direction of Engineer T. T. Lane a model job of installation has resulted.

The strike in the Ben Hur property adjoining the Silver Belle is developing richer and more extensive deposits of ruby silver and as all of these ledges cross directly into the Silver Belle property less than a hundred feet away it is now only a question of sinking to a depth of two hundred and fifty of three hundred feet until the Silver Belle cuts these same deposits and emerges as a proven mine.

The Silver Belle property is closest to the California Rand Inc., or “big silver” or any of the other companies now developing, except the Coyote, and now stands in the fortunate position of being between the original big silver mine of the district a few feet east, and the newest prospective shipper, the Ben Hur, a few feet in the other direction.

With completion of the installation of the machinery the Silver Belle has started sinking on its shaft and has secured the services of Frank Burge, a mining man from the northern part of the state as superintendent.  Lane is remaining with the company in a consulting capacity.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 29, 1922:  “SILVER BELL IN FINE ORE LEDGE –Uncover Promising Rock at 300-Foot Level On West Wall.—Randsburg, Nov. 29.—While cutting a station on the 300-foot level on the Silver Belle shaft a very promising ledge has been uncovered on the west wall of the station.

The Silver Belle management will not make any statement concerning the new development until it has been opened up and sampled, and sinking is being continued on the shaft, as the dip of the ledge is such that if will be encountered in the main shaft within another 50 feet of sinking.

The Silver Belle Company is under the supervision of conservative business men, and they are taking no chances on any exaggerated reports being issued about this property, it is said.  It is known however, that for the first 300 feet the shaft has been as highly mineralized as any shaft yet to be dug in the Rand district, and that the promising outlook disclosed has resulted in negotiations for the well-known White Horse property adjoining them on the west.

The acquisition of this new property gives the Silver Belle Company an almost unbroken line from the famous California Rand mine, east to the Errecart and Treasure Hill properties west, all of which can be operated with the present equipment which is among the heaviest and best in the district.” –Bakersfield California

January 5, 1923: “THE SILVER BELLE at 460 has a most promising showing.” – Bakersfield Californian

Silver Belle Shaft. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family.

January 22, 1923: “ONE OF THE FORTUNATE COMPANIES operating in the silver zone is the Silver Belle, they have had but little of the hard formation to sink through and have made excellent time in the sinking of their shaft.  As they are nearing the 600, they are cutting through a very likely and encouraging schist that may likely and encouraging schist that may at any shot bring in the ruby crystals, the kind that every man on the job is praying for.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 1, 1923: “The advancement on the Silver Belle during the past month will show what can be done with high-class machinery and management—170 feet and a station cut in, some showing.  They are now down 603 feet:  in another 24 hours they will place the station timbers for the sixth level and proceed to continue sinking.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 27, 1923: “ON THE SILVER BELLE, they have decided to try out cross cutting both on the fifth and seventy levels: stations have been cut in on both levels, on the fifth they will advance west and on the lower level east.” – Bakersfield Californian

March 25, 1923: “AT THE SILVER BELLE on their 500 cross-cut there are splendid indications of ore coming in.  They are due to cut the White Horse vein within a few feet and good reports may be expected at any time.  On their 714 level they are driving rapidly toward the “Big Fault Vein” generally known as the Kelly dike.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 2, 1923: “MR. AND MRS. FRANK PANERO AND MRS. D. L. SHUFFLET of Delano, were interested visitors over Thursday; besides a desire to see the Rand district and the big silver mine, they had in view the Silver Belle property in which they have an interest.” – Bakersfield Californian

April 3, 1923:  “ED BURGE, PRESIDENT OF THE SILVER BELLE and N. R. Solomon, treasurer paid a midweek visit to the company’s holdings, finding the advancement of levels 5 and 7 favorable.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 14, 1923: “RICH ORE FOUND IN SILVER BELLE—Well defined Ledges Yield Values as High as $497 a Ton.—Randsburg, April 14.—Sensational changes in formation have been encountered on both the five hundred foot drift west and the seven hundred foot cross-cut east, at the Silver Belle Mining property. On both levels well defined ledges were encountered late Saturday and Sunday morning of such width that the faces of the drifts are still in the ledges after three days of development work. The first assay taken gave a return of $495, a second one taken the next day showed values of $497 and yesterday’s assay gave a return of $276 per ton. A remarkable feature of the new strike is the fact that the values are heavier in gold than in silver, contrary to the ore of the California Rand, or Kelly mining property adjoining. The ledge opened up on the 700 foot level is about 200 feet from the property line of the California Rand Silver.  The Silver Belle company is largely financed by Kern and Orange county people and has been very conservative in giving out reports as the development has progressed, but the values just encountered are of such character that the news spread rapidly and hundreds of visitors have been to the mine within the last few days to see for themselves the character of the ore encountered, and possibilities for another big mine in the district.”—Bakersfield Californian

April 15, 1923: “SILVER BELCE (sic) ORE SAID TO BE RICH. –RANDSBURG, APRIL 14. –Sensational changes in formation have been encountered on both the five hundred foot drift west and the seven hundred foot cross-cut east, at the Silver Belle Mining property.

On both levels well defined ledges were encountered late Saturday and Sunday morning of suck width that the faces of the drifts are still on the edges after three days of development work.

The first assay taken gave a return of $485, a second one taken the next day showed values of $497 and yesterday’s assay gave a return of $276 per ton.

A remarkable feature of the new strike is the fact that the values are heavier in gold than in silver, contrary to the ore of the California Rand, or Kelly Mining property adjoining.

The ledge opened up on the 700 foot level is about 200 feet from the property line of the California Rand Silver.  The Silver Belle Company is largely financed by Kern County and Orange County people and has been very conservative in giving out reports as the development has progressed, but the values just encountered are of such character that the news spread rapidly and hundreds of visitors have been in the mine within the last few days to see for themselves the character of ore encountered and possibilities for another big mine in the district.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

July 1, 1923:  “LEGAL NOTICE— NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING –Notice is  hereby given that the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Belle Mining Company of Randsburg, a corporation will be held at the office and principal place of business of said Corporation, located at Rooms 208 and 209 Hopkins Building at the City of Bakersfield, in the State of California, on the 10th day of July, 1923, at 7:00 o’clock in the evening of that day, for the purpose of election of directors for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as may properly come before said meeting.

By Order to the Board of Directors of said Corporation

E. D. BURGE

President of said Corporation

N. R. SOLOMON

Secretary of said Corporation

June 25, 27, 28, 29, July 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, & 10, 1923

Bakersfield Morning Echo

September 23, 1923: “DELINQUENT NOTICE –Silver Belle Mining Company of Randsburg –There are delinquent on the following described Stock on account of assessment No. 1, levied on the seventh day of August, 1923, the several amounts set opposite the name of shareholders as follows;

(A list of delinquent stock holders too numerous to transcribe)

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board of Directors made on the 7th day of August, 1923 so many shares of each parcel of stock as may be necessary will be sold at Public Auction in the office of the company, 209 Hopkins Building, Bakersfield, Calif., one the 29th day of September, 1923, at the hour of 2 p. m. of said day to pay said delinquent assessment thereon together with costs of advertising and expense of sale.

NAT R. SOLOMON

Secretary

Sept. 15th to 25th to 29th, 1923

Bakersfield Californian.

October 17, 1923:  “NOTICE OF STOCK HOLDERS MEETING – Notice is hereby given that a special stockholders meeting of the Silver Belle Mining Company of Randsburg, a corporation, will be held at the office and principal place of business of said Corporation, located at rooms 208 and 209 Hopkins Bldg., in the City of Bakersfield , in the State of California, on the 27th day of October, 1923 for the purpose of deciding on a matter of importance to the Company, and the transaction of such other business at may properly come before said meeting.

By order of the Board of Directors of said Corporation

N. R. SOLOMON

Secretary of Said Corporation

E. E. BURGE

President of said Corporation

Oct. 16, 17, 18, 19, 29, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 1923

Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 10, 1923:  “ASSESSMENT NOTICE –Silver Belle Mining Company of Randsburg. –Location of principal place of business, Bakersfield, California. —NOTICE is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, on the 27th day of October, 1923, and assessment of Two Cents ($.02) per share on all issued Capital Stock of the corporation was levied, payable on or before the 1st day of December, 1923, in lawful money of the United States, to the Secretary, at the office of the company, Room 200, Hopkins Bldg., Bakersfield, California

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 1st day of December, 1923, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 2nd day of January, 1924, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of advertising and of sale.

By order of the Board of Directors

N. R. SOLOMON

Secretary

Office: Room 209, Hopkins Building

Bakersfield, California

Nov. 3, 10, 17, 24; Dec. 1, 1923

Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 24, 1923: “RANDSBURG, DEC. 24.—FRANK BURGE SUPERINTENDENT in charge of the Silver Belle mine, is making a test shipment of 2000 pounds of free milling gold ore taken from a new find made near the company headquarters.  The vein, 15 inches, looks promising.  With a fair figure from test shipment, further development will be recommended.  Advices from the company’s office at Bakersfield state that immediately after the first of the New Year operations will resume on the silver side of the property.  The Silver Belle lines are snugly up against the Uranium No.3, the Treasure Hill and the St. Lawrence.”—Bakersfield Californian

January 5, 1924: “TWO COMPANIES START WORK AT RANDSBURG—Randsburg, Jan. 5.—As promised the Silver Belle mining company, resumed work after the first of the year.  Drifting west on the 500-foot level, starting work on the first Wednesday in the new year.”—Bakersfield Californian

January 9, 1924:  “DELINQUENT NOTICE –Silver Belle Mining Co. of Randsburg—There are delinquent on the following described stock, on account of Assessment No. 1, levied on the 27th day of October, 1923, the several amounts are opposite the name of the respective stockholders as follows:  (a long list of stockholders followed)

And in accordance with law and an order of the Board of Directors made on the 27th day of October, 1922, so many shares of each parcel of stock as may be necessary will be sold at public auction, in the office of the Company, 204 Hankins Building, Bakersfield, Calif.; On the 2nd day of January, 1924, at the hour of 2 p. m. of said day to pay any delinquent assessment thereon together with costs of advertising and expenses of sale.

NAT R. SOLOMON

Secretary

The above sale is hereby continued until Saturday Feb. 2nd at 2 P. M

By order of the Board of Directors

SILVER BELLE MINING CO.

Jan 9 to Feb. 2, 1924, Inc.

Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 28, 1924: “THE SILVER BELL is drifting west on the fifth.”—Bakersfield Californian

January 11, 1925:  “ACTIVE WORK, it is said, has started on a number of other properties in the silver zone.  Reports are to the effect that the Silver King, North Rand, Silver Belle and a number of other properties are under option at attractive figures for the owners of stock.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 27, 1926: “SILVER BELLE MINE DEVELOPMENT STARTS – Silver Belle Mining Company has levied an assessment of 2 cents per share to finance immediate development of their property in the Rand district, according to officials of the company, who stated that the assessment was authorized at a stockholders meeting held early this week in this city and Santa Ana.

The development program includes a drift at the 500-foot level of the shaft which was sunk to a depth of 700 feet several years ago.  Ed Burge of Santa Ana, former Kern County oil man, is president of the company, and the stock is held principally by residents of Bakersfield and Santa Ana.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE SILVER BELL MINING COMPANY holds a group of three claims adjoining the California Rand Silver holdings on the west.  The property is developed by a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft. –Hulin

April 2, 1926: “LEGAL NOTICES –NOTICE OF CHANGE OF PRINCIPAL PLACE OF US BUSINESS OF THE SILVER BELLE MINING COMPANY –Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Silver Belle Mining Company, a corporation, help on the 24th day of May, 1924, said Board of Directors passed a resolution that the principal place of business of the said Silver Belle Mining Company be changed from the City of Bakersfield, Kern County, State of California , to the City of Santa Ana, Orange County, State of California and notice is further given that the owners and stockholders of more than two-thirds of the outstanding Capital stock of the said corporation to-wit over 199,305 shares have consented in writing to said change and notice is further given that it is the intention of the said Silver Belle Mining Company to change its principal place of business, from said city of Bakersfield, Kern County, State of California, to the said City of Santa Ana, Orange County, State of California.

Silver Belle Mining Company

By E. D. BURGE

President

CLYDE C. DOWNING

Attorney

First National Bank Building, Santa Ana, California

March 15, 20; April 2, 9, 1926

Bakersfield, Californian

Mineral Survey No. 6015, Sacramento Land District, surveyed March 26, 1929, known as Silver Belle No. 1 Lode, owned by Silver Belle Mining Company of Randsburg, improvements consist of 2 cuts, 1 shaft and cut, 1 shaft and trench and an undivided ½ interest in a shaft and crosscut, valued at $16,692. Located S.W. ¼ sec. 6, T30S., R41E., M.D.M.

SILVER GIANT

February 1, 1923: “JACK STAPLES HAS HANDLED ANOTHER GOOD TRANSACTION in the sale of a group of claims lying between the Rand Giant Silver holdings and the water wells.  Fred Pearson and Claude Short, the locators, will receive $5000 for their interest.  The opening up of the  Rand Silver Giant, lying northeasterly of the California Rand Silver, has much to do with attracting the new owners.” –Bakersfield Californian

CHRONOLOGY

Silver Giant Mining Company of Randsburg Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

March 14, 1923: “O. R. STAPLES came up Tuesday morning from Los Angeles with the cheering news that Giant Rand Silver, of which he is the general manager, has purchased hoist, compressor, drills, materials and supplies, and immediate shipment will be made.  Staples is here for the purpose of rushing the concrete foundations around their 50-foot hat, the same having the collar installed and the shaft fully timbered.  The Giant Silver shaft is in sight of the California Rand Silver’s No. 6 shaft, also a short distance from the Y of the Santa Fe system at Johannesburg.” – Bakersfield Californian

April 2, 1923: “E. J. JUDD A PRACTICAL MINING MACHINERY MAN known in all of the large camps, now with the Fairbanks-Morse people, is here setting up and adjusting the new machinery plant at the Silver Giant workings located about one and a half miles north of the “Big Silver’s” No. 6 shaft.  A 50-foot shaft, in perfect condition cribbed and timbered, and a blacksmith shop with everything ready to go on with the work.”—Bakersfield Californian

May 17, 1923:  “RANDSBURG, MAY 17. –SURVEYOR R. F. DICKENSON has spotted the site for the double compartment shaft on the Flat Tire group of claims, adjoining the Santa Fe group, just due north of the Californian Rand Silver’s No. 6 shaft, lying under and between the Big 4 Group and the Rand Silver Giant workings.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE SILVER GIANT MINING COMPANY holds a group of four mining claims situated well up on the northwest slope of Red Mountain.  The center of the property is almost 2 miles northeast of the No. 1 Shaft of the California Rand Silver Mine.  The development on the property consists of a 1 ½ compartment shaft down only 80 feet, all in Rosemond formation.” --Hulin

SILVER GLANCE LEASE

CHRONOLOGY

January 24, 1923: “JUST ACROSS THE TRACK from the Silver Glance lease, now down 35 feet.  With the lumber coming in it looks as if they were getting ready to start work on their headframe.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 25, 1923:  “THE SILVER GLANCE holdings adjoining the California the California Rand.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 25, 1923:  “THEY HAVE SUNK AND TIMBERED 84 feet in six weeks with one shift, all hand work.  They have now secured air for power drills from the Silver King, and work will go ahead with great speed.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 8, 1923:  “A COMPRESSOR is also being installed at the Silver Glance shaft, another Pearce-controlled property.  The shaft is now down 490 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 8, 1924:  “SILVER GLANCE TO OPERATE ELECTRICALLY—Randsburg, Jan. 8.—From Bakersfield is learned that the Silver Glance, west of the “Big Silver,” will be among the busy users of juice in the silver zone.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 28, 1924: “A NEW HOIST and some needed machinery have been ordered for the Silver Glance.  Upon the arrival of same work will be resumed.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 18, 1924:  “ARRANGEMENTS HAVE BEEN COMPLETED as to resuming sinking on the Silver Glance shaft.  During the present limit of juice the work will be done by the night shift.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 24, 1924:  “ANTICIPATION OF HITTING the schist in the Silver Glance shaft was generally conceded at about a depth of 700 feet, but the “wise ones” are now congratulating the management on the much-wanted formation at below the 500; at the latter depth they encountered eroded granite and shortly after they cut the schist.  The shaft now down 540 feet will be continued to the 700 before any laterals will be started.  With their new machinery and an excellent band of miners, day and night shifts, record sinking is expected for the next 160 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 13, 1924:  “SILVER GLANCE ACTIVE –The Silver Glance at 550 feet, is cutting some fine looking white quartz showing a good white iron and a little antimony.  With the good equipment lately installed, this shaft ought to be among the record-breakers for fast sinking.  It is the intention of the company to sink to the 700; at that level they will cross-cut to the Silver King shaft for ventilation purposes.” –Bakersfield Californian

July 25, 1924:  “EXCELLENT PROGRESS is being made in the sinking of the Silver Glance shaft, which is now down 770 feet.  It is the intention of the operators to continue down to the 900-foot level, at which depth a station will be cut in for the purpose of running a cross-cut to connect with the Big Silver No. 6 shaft.  At the bottom they have encountered a little water.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 1, 1924:  “WITH THE TIGHTENING of the rock at the 785 in the bottom of the Silver Glance shaft, the seepage of water has not increased, still making between 2 and 3 buckets a day.”—Bakersfield Californian

August 22, 1924:  “”…ACROSS THE SANTA FE RAILROAD TRACK, is the plant of the Silver Glance Mining Company, with two shifts, now below the 800-foot level.  GOING FOUND GOOD – It was first intended to run a crosscut at the 700-foot level for the purpose of connecting with the Silver King shaft, both for ventilation and safety.  But finding the going good, they continued on and when the 900-foot depth is gained a cross-cut to the No. 6 workings will be made; this will give them new territory to open, a benefit to all of the active and adjoining.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 23, 1924:  “SILVER GLANCE SHAFT BEING SENT DEEPER—Randsburg, Aug. 23.—Sinking on the Silver Glance will continue, the main shaft now down 830 feet with water coming in pretty freely.  It is the management’s plan to sink to the 9oo foot level if possible.  A level at that distance would give them connection with the Big Silver, later on with the Silver King’s deep workings.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 10, 1924:  “SINKING CONTINUES on the Santa Fe, Silver Glance and the Silver Queen shafts with three shifts.  Owing to the heavy flow of water coming in the Silver Glance during the idle hours of the forepart of the day, there is a drawback in being able to keep up the fast pace of going down.  This water must be hauled up, some 35 buckets before the miners can get down to steady work; this delay has given the play to the Santa Fe gang who is now down to the 870 against the Silver Glance’s 845.  At no time has the Silver Queen bunch gone out for a record unless it is to be able to boast of the finest finished and best equipped shaft, not only in the district but n any district of the great big desert.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 22, 1924:  “SILVER GLANCE TO DO 800-FOOT LEVEL WORK—Randsburg, Sept. 22. – The Silver Glance management instead of continuing sinking to the 900-foot level will do the lateral work on the 800-foot level.  With the good showings made in  the shaft from time to time, with the nearness  of the Silver King and  Coyote workings and in line with the ore zone of the Big Silver, this development is being closely watched as the developments of the Santa Fe, Silver Queen and the Flat Tire.’” –Bakersfield Californian

October 25, 1924:  “DUE TO POWER SHORTAGES, curtailing work to the night shifts only, and the existence of water in the shaft, the Silver Glance operations have been discontinued, according to information supplied at the law firm of Emmons & Aldrich.  The Silver Glance has been shut down, but not permanently, according to Mr. E. J.  Emmons, who stated that another reason for closing the mine was to prepare for its further exploitation.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 25, 1924:  “BOTH THE SANTA FE AND THE SILVER GLANCE are believed to be about ready to get underway. The Santa Fe operators are now about convince that they can keep the water below the ninth level lateral work.  The Silver Glance will be ready to go when its new 75-horsepower motor is installed.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 21, 1925:  “RUBY SILVER FOUND IN SILVER GLANCE MINE.—Reports of a rich ledge found in the shaft of the Silver Glance mine at Randsburg were received in Bakersfield today by E. J. Emmons, one of the owners of  the property.  The extent of the strike is not yet known, but it is encouraging enough to give impetus to extensive development work, according to those interested in the project.

The Silver Glance is locate east of the railroad track and near the California Rand Incorporated and the Silver King.  C. R. Diller is foreman of the property and a number of local people are interested financially, among them being E. J. Emmons, M. A. Dulgar and James A. Currie.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 27, 1925:  “CONFIRMS REPORT OF SILVER GLANCE FIND. –Stating that the ruby silver ore encountered in the Silver Glance mine at Randsburg looks like a real strike Ed Herkelrath of Randsburg, who is in Bakersfield, brings confirmation of the reports printed in this paper.  He says that the pay chute was struck on the 800-foot level and it is from a northerly to southerly direction, dipping to the east.  It contains gold values.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 12, 1925:  “BAKERSFIELD MEN READY TO BID MILLION FOR MINE IN RANDSBURG DISTRICT –Hollywood Group First to Close 60-day Option.  –$750,000 is Offered – Local Company Will Develop Valuable Ore Strike.—Eager to bid one million dollars for the Silver King group of mining claims in Randsburg district,  directors of the Silver Glance Company organized by local people, met in Bakersfield yesterday resolved to take immediate action if an option held by other interest expired.  In a telegram from President Buckley of the holding company came the disappointing information that the mine had been sold.

“The deal was completed this morning at Hollywood” was the terse telegram from President Buckley, read at the meeting of the Silver Glance directors, ready to step into the place of former option holders.

It is understood that the sale was negotiated at a price of $750,000.  The option had been in force during the past 60 days, as exclusively published in The Echo.

SILVER GLANCE IN PAY—Although disappointment reigned in the directors meeting of the local company in losing out in plans to buy the Silver King group, it is thought that a  10 acre lease on the property held by the Silver Glance Company will prove to be a source of great riches.

We were disappointed in not being able to obtain the Silver King group stated Mr. Emmons, “but the other fellow beat us to it.”

WILL START SHIPPING—Immediate shipping of ore from the Silver Glance, and an intensive campaign to put the mine in the big producing class, will be a result of the decision reached yesterday.  High grade shipping ore, running values from $200 to $300 a ton, has been encountered in quantity according to reports.

The directors decided yesterday, to employ and expert engineer to make a survey of the development, which has reached a depth of ___feet.  On the 800-foot level ore has been encountered in both and east and west drifts.  In the 20-foot drift, in the west some water was encountered and the work was pushed to the east in a 280-foot drift.

ENCOUNTER RUBY.—Ore showing ruby is to be seen in both tunnels.  The mineralized zone is five feet in width with three fort of high grade in the pay shute.  Gold values assaying $54 to the ton were encountered on the 700 foot level.  Owing to the depth and extent of the values uncovered the owners of the property feel jubilant.

The property adjoins the California Rand Silver, Inc. which has produced more than $10,000,000 in values since 1919.  Last month the gross production in this mine was more than $300,000.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 12, 1925:  “SILVER KING MINE IS REPORTED SOLD–$1,000,000 Offer by Local People Declared to Have Been Turned Down. — Meeting to offer as high as $1,000,000 for the Silver King mining properties near Randsburg, directors of the Silver Glance mining company, were disappointed yesterday to learn that the property had already been sold, the transfer taking place at Hollywood, according to a telegram from President W. B. Buckley, of the Silver King Company, read at the local meeting.  E. J. Emmons, secretary of the Silver Glance Company, estimates that the sale price for the Silver King property would be in the neighborhood of $750,000.  The purchasers of the property are now known as yet.

Mr. Emmons expressed the disappointment of his directorate in being unable to bid in on the Silver King properties, “While we wanted to bid for this group,” explained Mr. Emmons, “It was merely to add to our 10 acre lease which comprises the Silver Glance claim which we believe to be very rich and which is not for sale.”

Mr. Emmons stated that plans in the further development of the Silver Glance property embrace immediate shipments of ore and a detailed survey of the mine’s possibilities by S. J. Pearce a mining engineer who has been appointed by the directors.  Mr. Pearce will also assay the mines ore in the new shute.  Ore running values from $200 to $500 a ton has been assayed from the Silver Glance according to Mr. Emmons.

At this time there is a 900 foot level in the mine with ore encountered in east and west drifts at the 800 foot level.  Some water has been encountered to the westward.  Gold values assaying $54 to the ton have been revealed on the 700 foot level.  The mineral zone is reported to be five feet wide with a three-foot high grade.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 17, 1925:  “SHOW GOLD SAMPLES FROM SILVER GLANCE—Randsburg, Feb. 17.—Samples of rough coarse gold bearing rock from a drift on the 800 level of the Silver Glance, 80 feet west of the shaft, are being shown on the streets and in the various business houses of Randsburg.  Many pieces show the beautiful yellow metal imbedded in the silver rock, and can be classed as jewelry specimens.  At that, it is believed that the quartz would stand for being cut and polished.

This showing was found on the north-south vein and lines up with the Navaho Extension claim, as opened up by Eddie Grady and associates, in their extensive prospecting and development from their 1000-foot shaft, on the other side of the railroad tracks from the Big Silvers working shafts.  With only one shift of hardy miners doing their level best, the work of advancing is handicapped with the incoming water, some 10,000 gallons a day being hoisted.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 25, 1925:  “ONLY ONE SHIFT was lost during the repair of the hoist on the Silver Glance last Friday.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 10, 1925:  “M. A. BULGAR, active in the Silver Glance management, was here from Randsburg yesterday.  He stated that some exceptionally fine ore is being obtained in the deep workings. He came here from Los Angeles yesterday.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 28, 1925: “RICH GOLD STRIKE IN RANDSBURG REPORTED –Gold ore assaying $14,000 a ton has been struck in the opening of a new vein in the Silver Glance mine at Randsburg, according to a letter received by G. W. Gallagher of Bakersfield, from his brother, Ed Gallagher, at the mining town.

Resulting from the excitement created over the find, each car of ore being guarded and every effort is being bent toward reducing to a minimum any waste in the handling of the pay dirt and its sacking before being shipped to the smelter.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 1925: “THE SILVER GLANCE LEASE, working on property owned by the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, is being developed by a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft.  This shaft is located about 600 feet southeast of the Silver King Shaft.  It has only recently (April, 1924), passed through the Rosamond formation into the underlying Rand schist, reaching the schist at a depth of 502 feet.” --Hulin

Si;ver Glance Headframe 1926. Southwest Mining

April 10, 1925:  “E. J. FAUNTIEROY brought in yesterday some specimens of ruby silver ore from the Silver Glance mine at Randsburg.  He states that the recent strike is being opened up, and conditions are encouraging.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

June 9, 1925:  “NOTICE—Demand is hereby made by M. A. Dulgar, President of the Silver Glance Inc., Mining Company, that you call a special meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Glance Inc. Mining Company, to meet in Bakersfield, California, the principal place of business of the said corporation, on the 27th day of June, at the hour of 1:30 p. m. to consider at said meeting the election of a board of directors, the financial condition of the company and the  purchase of additional property.

(Signed)                                                                                    M. A. DULGAR

President

Bakersfield, California, June 7, 1925

June 9 to 25, incl.

Bakersfield Californian

June 13, 1925:  “NOTICE—Pursuant to demand made by the President of the Silver Glance Inc., a corporation, notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Stockholders of the Silver Glance, Inc., will be held at the City of Bakersfield, on the 27th day of June, 1925, at the place of business of the said Silver Glance, at 1511 Eighteenth Street,  at the hour of 2 o’clock p. m., or at such other place as may be decided upon, for the purpose of considering the election of Directors of the said corporation, and for the purpose of  considering the purchase other property, and for devising the financial system to facilitate the purchase of said property.

Dated June 9, 1925

L. F. ELWOOD

Secretary of Silver Glance, Inc.

June 10 to 26 incl.

Bakersfield Californian

June 14, 1925:  “RENEW OFFER FOR MINING INTERESTS – Silver Glance Company is Ready to Take Over Property of Silver King.—Negotiations are in progress for purchase of the Silver King group of claims, according to George W. Gallagher, who states that the Silver Glance Company has renewed its offer to pay a million dollars for the property.  The Tremaine interests, it is said, defaulted recently on an option to purchase the property.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

July 27, 1925:  “DRILLING OPERATIONS IN THE SILVER GLANCE are being held up for a few days, according to Attorney Emmons, to allow the installing of a new compressor which when put in operation, will permit four automatic drills to be continuously used instead of one as has been the case in the past.  As soon as the new compressor is ready to be used, work will be commenced in attempting to reach a valuable vein of ore discovered on the 800-foot level. To simplify the removing of earth in uncovering the lode the mine crew will stope up from the 900-foot drift to the main body of ore, it is said.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 3, 1925:  “$750,000 PAID BY SILVER GLANCE MINING COMPANY—Deal Calls For $20,000 Payment; 80 Acres Sold. – Papers Clinching Transfer Already Signed by Directors.  – JOHANNESBURG CO. SELLING PROPERTY –Three Acres Deeded Rand Silver, According to Agreement. – Agreeing to pay $750,000, Silver Glance Mining Company, lessee, has completed negotiations for the outright purchase of 80 acres of Randsburg property, comprising its claims to Silver Glance Mine (formerly Silver King No. 1), and Silver King Mines N0s. 2,3, and 4,  it became known today.  Final papers binding the deal with Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, lessor, formerly owning the rich property which in the past has been worked under lease by Silver Glance interests, were signed on October 1, according to E. J. Emmons, one of the directors of Silver Glance Mine.

$20,000 CASH—Twenty thousand dollars cash is to be paid Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company within 60 days according to the agreement, the Silver Glance operators to assume immediate possession of the mines.  The balance of the $750,000 is to be paid in the future from the production of the claims, according to Mr. Emmons.

In acquiring the claims, officials of the Silver Glance mines entered into a second agreement in which three and one-third acres adjoining the claim of Uranium N0. 11 are deeded to California Rand Silver, Inc., to settle apex rights with the operators of the Big Silver claim.  It is said by Mr. Emmons that the apex of Uranium No. 11 pitched into the claims of Silver King Mines No. 2 and 4 and that in consideration of the small piece of land the boundary line established by the Californian Rand interests has been made vertical instead of slanting into the Silver King claims as in the past.

“In granting the three and one-third acres to Big Silver, we of the Silver Glance have made the title to our newly-acquired property absolutely safe.,” declared Mr. Emmons.  “The title is absolutely clear and we see not prospect of future litigations.”

Mr. Emmons believes that the move on the part of Silver Glance directors in addition to discoveries made to the shaft of Big Four Mine will, without doubt, make Randsburg a large and permanent camp.  “Silver Glance is down to the 900-foot level now.” He says “and within 30 days we will have a big crew of men on the location to sink the shaft still lower in preparation for sending out new drifts and stoping up to a ledge of high-grade ore that was struck a short time ago between the 700 and 900-foot levels.”

Prominent mining engineers who have looked over the Silver Glance claim declare that is shows all the appearances of developing into a big mine and that patches of ore already discovered are indicative of larger bodies in the vicinity of the shaft and the 300 or so feet of drifting already made.

SELL SHARES—discussing plans of the officials of the mine, Mr. Emmons stated that a limited number of shares in the claim will be sold in the near future.  “But,” he explained, “we are not going to issue more than will be absolutely necessary to continue the work of the mine.  Already 320,000 shares have been issued and we are going to keep the organization as concentrated as possible.  At the present time ours is one of the richest companies in the district and this is the first time from the inception of the Silver Glance work we have offered interest in the mine to the public as an investment.”

W. L. Buckley and J. C. Bonham of Tacoma, Washington, are signatories to the agreement for Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company in the capacity of president and secretary of the organization.  Both are prominent business men in the north and Mr. Bonham is the manager of the fifth largest flour milling company in the world.

Directors of Silver Glance mine are M. A. Dulgar, Bakersfield, president; H. T. Kemp, Pasadena; L. B. Yaeger, Los Angeles; G. B. Moore, Pasadena and E. J. Emmons of Bakersfield.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 4, 1925:  “SILVER KING IS SOLD TO SILVER GLANCE COMPANY.—Sale of the Silver King group adjoining claims in Rand District to the Silver Glance Company, which has been under negotiation for the past three months is nearing completion according to E. J. Emmons.  Under the terms of the sales agreement a cash consideration or $20,000 is to be paid and the balance of $750,000 is to be paid from the production of the mine.

In recent agreements the Johannesburg company deeded the California Rand Silver, Inc., a strip of land claimed under apex rights, and this left the property free of encumbrances.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 7, 1925:  “FIRST PAYMENT ON SILVER KING GROUP IS MADE.  The Silver King group of mining claims adjoining the Big Silver mine in Rand mining district has been taken over by the Silver Glance Company, first payment on the property being made on the first of this month.  Under the direction of George C. Taylor, mining engineer, the Silver Glance Company has placed a crew of hard rock miners at work.  The hoist and other equipment of the Silver King property being used by the new owners.

Under the terms of the sale a payment of $20,000 is to be made by January 1.  This amount will be paid in three installments falling due on November, December, and January 1.

In a statement yesterday attorney E. J. Emmons said that the situation is now clear for active development work upon the mining property, which was purchased at a valuation of $750,000.

Payments are to be made from the production obtained in future operations.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

November 27, 1925:  “HIT ORE VALUES IN SLVER GLANCE MINE –Rich ore values on the 875-foot level of Silver Glance mine in Randsburg district have been uncovered, revealing a vein discovered on the 800-foot level , according to E. J. Emmons, on the board of directors of the company.

Mr. Emmons is highly confident of richer values yet to be uncovered, due to the presence of water in the vein, a peculiarity of the richer mineralized veins in the district.

Report of the rich strike was revealed upon Mr. Emmons return from Los Angeles, where he conferred with other officials of the company and southern capitalists regarding the sale of a block of stock sufficient in size to insure the payments of the Silver King group recently purchased by Silver Glance interests.” –Bakersfield Californian.

December 12, 1925:  “SILVER GLANCE STRIKE RUNS TO $6 PER POUND.—Ruby silver and coarse gold encountered in the 25-foot sump beneath the ninth level (875 feet) in the Silver Glance operations in Randsburg confirms the first reports as to a strike made in the finishing round in the shaft.  The Randsburg Times states that samples brought in this week proved to be specimen ore, some of the pieces showing heavy, coarse grains of gold.  The mining paper says:

“Samples brought in Tuesday morning proved to be specimen ore, many of the pieces showing heavy coarse grains of gold imbedded in the rock.  A few choice pieces which will find their way to the street could be pronounced as being worth $6 or more to the pound.  No assays were made on the specimens, but assays on the samples from the face returned 33 ounces of silver and a dollar and sixty cents in gold.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 24, 1925:  “ASSAY SHOWS NEW WORKING HOLDING SOME $900 ORES.  Flowing gold stringers and ruby silver intermingled.  M. A. Dulgar brought samples of high grade ore recently encountered in the Silver Glance workings as an evidence of the strike to help cheer the holiday spirit of Bakersfield stockholders upon his arrival yesterday from Randsburg.  The strike was made on the ninth-level in a station of the 875 foot shaft, it was announced.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 6, 1926:  “FINAL CASH PAYMENT MADE ON KERN MINE—Final cash payments in the purchase of the Silver King mining claims of Randsburg by Silver Glance Company for $750,000 have been made and deeds transferring title to the properties placed in escrow with First National Bank, of Bakersfield.

E. J. Emmons, director of the Silver Glance Company, announced to The Californian today that the cash payments for the properties consisted of $20,000 and that the remaining $730,000 is to be paid by 15 per cent of the net smelter returns.

Purchase of the Silver King group, of which Silver King No. 2 is now known as Silver Glance, was made from Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, of which W. B. Buckley is president.  M. A. Dulgar of Bakersfield is president of the Silver Glance organization.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 26, 1926:  “SILVER GLANCE WILL SHIP CARLOAD OF ORE—Resuming operations after installing a water pump system, Silver Glance crews are preparing for shipments of a carload lot of the high grade ruby silver and wire gold ore taken from the recently opened vein between the 700 and 900-foot levels, it is reported.

A heavy flow of water was started with the blast that opened the vein and work had to be suspended while pumping facilities were being installed.

Mining men who have examined the Silver Glance property have declared that the strike has been one of the richest ever made in the Rand district.

Silver Glance Mining Company recently purchased the claims now being operated as well as the Silver King group for $750,000, paying $20,000 cash.

E. J. Emmons of this city played a prominent part as a director of the Silver Glance interests in handling the deal.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 1926: “SILVER GLANCE, INC. – Randsburg Property, Adjoining California Silver Rand, Opens Rich Vein at Depth—Dark Ruby Silver and Free Gold Ore Carries High Values –Shipment Under Way—One of the most important strikes in the recent history of the Randsburg district has been made by Silver Glance, Inc., owning and operating the Silver King group of four claims east of and adjoining the properties of California Rand Silver, Inc., and Randsburg Silver Mining Co. The strike was made in Silver Glance shaft, on Silver King No. 1 claim, approximately 700 feet from the east side of the Coyote claim of Randsburg Silver Mining Co., on a parallel vein to that developed in the latter’s ground and known as the Big-Four-Glance vein.  Further northeast about 2200 feet the Big Four Company is believed to have developed the same vein at the 1300-foot level.  In this case however considerable water developed when the vein was entered and operations were temporarily suspended until further financing and equipment had been provided.

THOUGH HEAVY WASH—The Silver Glance shaft was sunk through 500 feet of wash and a zone of crushed schist between 200 and 300 feet deep.  It entered the Rand schists in place at about 800 feet and picked up the vein, upon which drifts and cross-cuts to the extent of between 300 and 350 feet were run.  At this horizon it was found however that the vein was considerably broken, so sinking was resumed to the 910 foot level.  A station was cut at 875 feet and the vein again picked up, this time evidently well in place.  At the time the writer visited the ground, about the middle of March, the vein had been exposed for 90 feet northeast and 60 feet southwest, with an average width of between 8 and 10 feet.  The ore is the characteristic quartz of the district, carrying dark ruby silver, or proustite, with generous quantities of free gold.  Specimens running high in the thousands con be obtained and the management estimates, with evident conservatism, that the whole vein will break around $25 per ton.

SORTING HIGH GRADE –A sorting plant has been set up at the foot of the dump and high-grade ore will be hand sorted for shipment while arrangements are being made to ascertain the most efficient milling practice and provide funds for installation.  G. Cleveland Taylor, consulting engineer for the company, who is in direct charge of operations, expresses the belief that several carloads of ore running $100 per to can be sorted monthly, thus providing the company with sufficient funds to maintain development work on a fairly generous scale.

COVERS WILLIAMS VEIN—The vein runs northeast –southwest and dips about 60 degrees to the southeast.  Its strike will carry it through the company’s ground for approximately 1500 feet.  The Williams vein of California Rand Silver upon which a strike of great importance is rumored at the 1100 level, will pass into Silver Glance ground through the end line of Uranium No. 10 claim and if it holds its course should apex within Silver Glance ground for about 1500 feet.  The Silver King shaft of Silver Glance has already been sunk to a depth of 700 feet at a point near the side line of Uranium claim and it is the intention of Silver Glance to use this opening in prospecting for the Williams vein.  A drift will be run along the common side of the two companies and after passing beyond the Uranium end line a cross-cut will be run to pick up the vein.

EXTENDS PROVEN TERRITORY—The result of the work accomplished by the Silver Glance is of the utmost importance to the future of the Randsburg district, as it proves that the deeply wash-covered territory east of the Kelly mine is potential territory of the most inviting kind.  The Rand schist in which the silver veins of the district are found dips very easterly and the wash and broken upper schist extend for distances now proven of from 800 to 1300 feet.  This fact has held back development in the past, but now that results have been obtained, both by Big Four and Silver Glance, there should be increased activity in the vicinity.  There are other known veins in the vicinity which will be prospected through Silver Glance workings.  The Grady vein is believed to pass though it about 600 feet east of the Silver Glance shaft and there is another likely vein lying in between Silver Glance and Williams veins exposed by the Coyote workings at some depth.

Silver Glance Inc. Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

CONTROLLED IN BAKERSFIELD—Silver Glance, Inc., is largely owned in Bakersfield and has so far been developed by contributions of a small coterie of residents through the untiring efforts of M. A. Dulgar, president and general manager of the company. G. Cleveland Taylor, in charge of operations, has had wide experience in his profession and possesses intimate knowledge of developments in the Randsburg district.  Judge E. J. Emmons of Bakersfield, is a director and large owner of the company’s stock.  Capital of the company is $300,000, shares of par value of one dollar, of which about 70,000 shares remain in the treasury.”—Southwest Mining New Service

May 28, 1926:  “SILVER GLANCE MINE SHIPS CARLOAD OF ORE—The Silver Glance at Randsburg has shipped to the Selby Smelting Works a 30 ton car of silver and gold ore, and returns are expected within a few days.  It is estimated by those who are competent to judge, that the value of the ore will be between $70 and $100 per ton.  This is the first shipment made by the Silver Glance.  That company is preparing to sink to cut the ledge matter at a lower level.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 17, 1926:  “SILVER GLANCE SHOWS NEW ORE –Breaking into another vein of high grade ruby silver n sinking on the shaft of the Silver Glance mine, at 940 feet in depth, the miners made a sensational strike according to reports brought to this city this evening.  Kent Knowlton, who returned from the camp in company with Robert Lincoln Patterson, candidate for assemblyman, said that the miners regard the strike as important.

Sufficient work had not been done however, to reveal the extent of the vein of high grade ruby silver ore, and the development work during the next few days will attract increased interest.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 26, 1926:  “MINERS LOCATE ANTIMONY VEIN IN RAND DISTRICT –Strike Creates Big Revival of Interest in General Mine Activity.  Encountering an 8-foot antimony vein at the 1000 foot level that runs $27 to $28 a ton in gold values, miners in the Silver Glance mine in Rand mining district, 100 miles east of this city of the Mojave desert, have made an important strike according to information from E. J.  Emmons, a director in the company states yesterday that M. A. Dulgar, superintendent, in a visit to this city over the week end, confirmed the report.

The Silver Glance holdings are adjacent to the California Rand Silver, Inc.; known as the Big Silver in the Rand District.  The low price of silver, it is said, has turned the miners into a search for gold values and the strike on the Silver Glance has created a big revival of interest in mining.

“The Silver Glance also struck a fracture in the drift in the east, finding gold and silver values.” Said Mr. Emmons, “and a juncture with enrichment is expected in the operatin__” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 23, 1927:  NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING —The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Glance, Inc., will be held on the 30th day of January 1927 at the hour of 2 o’clock P. M.in the assembly place of the W. O. W. Hall,  1736 J Street, Bakersfield, California.

All bona-fide owners of stock, or their proxies, will be entitled to vote on all matters coming before the meeting

L. F. ELWOOD

Secretary

Jan. 10 to Jan. 30, 1927 Inc.

May 15, 1928:  “NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING –Silver Glance Inc.————Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Glance, Inc., a corporation, will be held at the W. O. W. Hall located at the corner of Eighteenth and I Streets, in the city of Bakersfield, County of Kern, State of California, on Thursday, the first day of May, 1928, at 2 o’clock in the afternoon of said day,  for the purpose of consenting in the consolidation of this corporation with the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, a corporation, and with the Big Four Mining Company, a corporation, and for the purpose of consenting to the sale, assignment, transfer and conveyance of the whole of  the property of this corporation and the transaction of such other business as may properly come before said  meeting.

By order of the  Board of Directors of Silver Glance, Inc., a corporation.

Dated May 15, 1928

(Corporate Seal)                             L. F. ELWOOD

Secretary of said Corporation

May 15 to 31, incl.

Bakersfield Californian

JOHANNESBURG MINING AND MILLING, INC. (SILVER KING and SILVER MOON)

SILVER MOON

CHRONOLOGY

Silver Moon Shaft. Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family

May 4, 1921: “AT THE SILVER MOON the showing made in the standard double shaft for 19 days, measures 39 ½ feet.  Grab samples from any part of the dump will run, it is said, better than $3.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 4, 1921:  “SILVER MOON LEASE—At 61 feet the formation is changing for the better.” –Bakersfield California

August 8, 1921:  “ON THE SILVER MOON LEASE the operators are reinforcing their tripod, installing a larger engine and erecting necessary buildings.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 29, 1921:   “THE SILVER MOON LEASE, at 108 feet, shows a more favorable formation similar to the sort that the successful strikes of the Grady and Coyote went through before uncovering the white metal ore.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 29, 1921:  “SILVER MOON MINE DEVELOPS GOOD ORE – W. M. Burdick, 603 Grove Street, returned from Randsburg today bringing with him a number of specimens of ore from the Silver Moon mine, in which he is interested.  The ore is very similar in appearance to that found in the Rand Silver incorporated, and according to Burdick runs from $22 to $80 a ton.

The strike in the Silver Moon was made at a depth of 113 feet and it is hoped the ore will show higher values as the depth becomes greater.  The mine s located not far from the Rand mine.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 18, 1921:  “SILVER MOON LEASE has run into a feet, similar to that found in the Grady, Coyote, and Bisbee and Brey, before they hit the  values, a kind of a capping before the rich ore was struck.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 3, 1921:  “THE SURPRISE FOR THE WEEK is the change of formation in the Silver Moon which now resembles that of the Grady lease and the Coyote claim, before they made the find. At 145 feet the Silver Moon cut through this formation into a quartz that carries gold value.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 8, 1921: “SILVER MOON, at 150 feet is going through very hard formation. –Bakersfield Californian

October 9, 1921:  “SILVER MOON at 150 feet going through hard formation.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 10, 1921:  “SINKING ON SILVER MOONSinking on the Silver Moon is worth while watching, at 155 feet it looks as if they are going to follow the log of Grady & Sill lease and the lucky Coyote claim of the Randsburg Mining Co.  At present they are going through the identical capping that the above named passed.  Mr. G. W. Gallaher states that financial aid arrived and that the company has been able to settle all of their delayed payments and accounts.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 19, 1921:  “THE SILVER MOON IS STILL SINKING in the hard but favorable formation.” Bakersfield Californian

October 26, 1921:  “THE SILVER MOON AND THE SILVER KING operated by the Gallagher interests, are being developed.”—Bakersfield Californian

November 11, 1921: “THE SILVER MOON IS SINKING through the hard, plain quartz similar to that struck in the Coyote and Bray shafts.  In both the latter this quartz seemed to be a capping on the formation that brought in the silver values.  The shaft is now down 170 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum.

November 25, 1921: “REPORT ACTIVITY AT JOHANNESBURG CAMP –George W. Gallaher, manager of  the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, of Randsburg, California spent Thanksgiving in Bakersfield with his wife, how is recovering from  an operation.    Mr. Gallaher reports the camp very lively. New houses are going up, also a number of store buildings and a garage.  He also stated that he had put one a double shift at the Silver Moon shaft and would push the work with all possible speed until he reached the silver-bearing ore.  The measure now show silver and gold value and are similar in every respect to those encountered in the Grady, Coyote, and Bisbee shafts, and from present indications high grade ore should be encountered within the next 40 feet.

Mr. Buckley, president of the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, spent two weeks in Randsburg having just returned from Tacoma.  He was highly pleased with the outlook and stated that the financial condition of the company was on a solid basis, as there was plenty of money available to push the work as fast as conditions warranted. –Bakersfield Californian

December 14, 1921:  “MR.HERKELRATH was foresighted enough to have filed on a number of choice claims, among which were the Silver Dyke, Silver Bar, Silver Moon and Dry Wash.   He has leased and bonded, or sold outright, all of these properties to companies preparing to develop.  He has several well-located claims, some of which he will perhaps develop, although he announces that he is among the lucky ones who came early when there was time to choose with judgment, and not in the haste of boom atmosphere.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 31, 1922:  “SILVER MOON is cutting in a station at the 300 level.  Now that they are through the hardest of the hard drilling, sinking will soon be resumed, and all are in hopes of bringing in a strike of ruby ore.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 24, 1922:  “WITH THE SEVERAL DEEP SHAFTS in the immediate vicinity of the Silver Moon, 1650 feet from the California Rand mine, a demand will be placed for a sub-station.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 5, 1922:  “W. V.  Buckley, president of the Johannesburg M. & M. Co., (Silver Moon), and a business man of Tacoma, are visiting the district and are well pleased with the showing made in the Silver Moon claim.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

March 5, 1922:  “SILVER MOON at 50 feet from the 300-foot level is getting into softer formation and the officials are confident that they will make a strike any day.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 9,  1922:  “IN   THE SILVER MOON, the formation is again changing for the better, that is, it is beginning to (to) look like the rock broken into on the K. C. M. (sic) lease before the Erricart hit into the real shipping ore.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

July 1, 1922:  “REPORTS WORK  DONE ON MINING PROPERTY—Randsburg, July 1.—The Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company has been considerable improvement work and makes the following  report for the year ending July 1:

Shaft sunk on Silver King property 360 feet and equipped with a 12 h. p. Fairbanks Morse hoist.  Built blacksmith shop and engine house.  This property adjoins the California Rand on the northeast commencing about 1200 feet from the double compartment shaft of the California Rand, and consists of four claims.

Silver Moon group is  being developed by a shaft 5  x 7 in  the clear now down 300 feet, cross-cuts  and drifts 200 feet, total work 500 feet.  This property is equipped with a 75 h. p. host, 10×17 Ingersoll Rand Compressor, driven by a 100 h.p. motor.  The cost of this work including machinery is $54,720.  This company is financed by Washington people, principally from Tacoma, Washington.

W.  B. Buckley, president of the company has been on the property since June 1, leaving Friday for Tacoma and was well pleased with the outlook, his expert assuring him that he had every reason to believe he will bring in a good mine.

George W. Gallaher of Randsburg is the local manager of this company.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 7, 1922:  “ON THE SILVER MINE they are heading for the Ben-Hur big vein, now out about 107 feet, with the expectation of having to make another 90 feet.  They are also cross-cutting on the 200 for the White Horse vein.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 5, 1923: “THE STRIKE AT THE SILVER KING is improving in extent.  The values are silver glance and ruby silver and are exceedingly high grade.  Engineer Jackson is enthusiastic over the situation.  He also reports good gold assays from the Silver Moon shaft, though the extent of the zone has not been sufficiently explored to class it as commercial at this time.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 24, 1923:  “WITH THE CROSS-CUTTING OF THE RUBY SILVER at and in the “Big Silver’s” No. 6 shaft a new life was given to the many owners and companies operating along the flat under Red Mountain, shortly after the Johannesburg company of Tacoma Wash., made it at 603 in the Silver Moon shaft and now have is for some 70 feet with every possibility of it continuing down.

February 13, 1923:  “STILL DRIFTING ON THE FIFTH LEVEL of the Silver Moon, Superintendent Jackson states that they are out an even hundred feet.  They have a big ledge, running low in values still.  They get as good as $13 in gold.  Mr. Jackson has great faith in the Silver Moon.  President Buckley has returned from Hollywood at which city the Buckleys will make their winter residence.  Mr. Buckley states that the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company will continue to do a lot of developing and advancement on their Silver King and Silver Moon Claims.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 3, 1923:  “ON THE SILVER MOON CLAIM, also owned by the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, they are doing a world of advancement, more so on the fifth level, drifts of 289 feet and cross-cuts of 396 feet.  In several places on the vein they have found good values in gold, showing that there is a possibility of their being in good mineralized ground.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 14, 1923:  “WORK IS PROGRESSING –Superintendent Jackson, for both the Silver Moon and the Silver King shafts, states that the advancement per week is along about 112 feet a week.   They are still prospecting on the 500 foot level of the Silver Moon; on the King they are drifting along the foot wall easterly and westerly; it is possible when the east drift is well on its way toward shaft No. 4 of the Johannesburg Mining and Milling company, that a mutual connection will be made with the California Rand Silver’s No. 6 shaft, if so, the latter hole will have to drop down 129 feet to make the seventh level of the Silver King.” –Bakersfield California

March 22, 1923:  “ON THE SILVER MOON CLAIM they are doing some good prospecting on Nos. 2 and 3.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 5, 1924: ED HERKELRATH is considering a leasing proposition on the Silver Moon claim, wherein a deep shaft may be started and sunk near the lines of the Big Silver, adjoining the latter company’s No 1 shaft.  The Silver Moon at one time  was under option and operation by the Johannesburg M. & M. Co., known locally as the Silver King.” –Bakersfield Californian

SILVER KING

CHRONOLOGY

March 11, 1920:  “MINING LOCATIONS – W. J. Quackenbush and M. J. Lovett have located the Silver Lode mining claim in the Rand district.  Mrs. Alice Lovett has located the Silver King claim in the Rand district.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 21, 1921:  “A NEW GASOLINE ENGINE HOIST is now being installed on the Silver King property, located on the north line of the of the “big silver”; they are now down 55 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 11, 1921:  “DEVELOPMENT WORK –Sinking continues on the Silver King and the Flat Tire groups.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 26, 1922:  “THE SILVER KING on the north lines of the California Rand’s holdings is now enlarging the head frame and other top work.  The big shaft is down 195 feet.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

May 19, 1922:  “WITH  THE LARGE HOIST FROM THE SILVER MOON properly and quickly installed on the Silver King, it will soon be proven whether or not the miners have reached bedrock at 252 feet, the present depth of Silver King shaft.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

May 21, 1922: “Out of (on) the flat things are looming up both north and  south, as stated in yesterday’s report the Silver King may have the bedrock.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

June 7, 1922:  “E. B. KING, W. B. BUCKLEY, P. F. ROSAIA and JOE GHILARIDUCI (all prominent business men of Tacoma, Wash., are registered at the St. Charles hotel in Johannesburg.  They are here on a visit to their mining properties, the Silver  King and Silver Moon.  Incorporated under the name of the Johannesburg Mining and Milling company.  They will  be here for a couple of weeks,  after which they will go to San Francisco to attend the Shriners’ convention there.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 14, 1922: “SILVER KING MAY BE NEXT –The Silver King adjoining the California Rand  Silver on the east looks mighty like the shaft has gotten through the overburden and was about to land on top of something good.  Last Saturday the last round of shots broke up some formation that when brought to the surface in the bucket contained a generous sprinkling of quartz and in this quartz were found heavy sulphides and several traces of silver.  That this shaft is located on valuable property has always been the opinion of mining men and it is fully-expected that the Silver King will get the ore in question and quality eventually.  We feel that the present indications are most favorable now and it wouldn’t surprise anyone to see the Silver King become the next shipper out of the Rand District.

Mr. W. B. Buckley, President of the Silver King Company, together with Mr. L. Ghilarducci, Treasurer and Mr. E. B. King, Director hurried to camp from San Francisco and Tacoma, Wash., upon receipt of the news that the formation in the shaft was changing and remained for several days. They were all feeling most hopeful and assured the News representative that they would do everything in their power to hurry the development of their property for the good of the entire district.” –The Rand District News

July 1, 1922: REPORTS WORK DONE ON MINING PROPERTY –RANDSBURG, July 1. – The Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company has been doing considerable improvement work and makes the following  report for the year ending July 1;

Shaft sunk on Silver King property 360 feet and equipped with a 12 h.p. Fairbanks Morse hoist.  Built blacksmith shop and engine house.  This property adjoins the California Rand on the northeast commencing about 1200 feet  from the  double compartment shaft of the  California Rand, and consists of four claims.

Silver Moon group is being developed by a  shaft 5 x 7 in the clear now down 300 feet,  cross cuts and drifts 200 feet total work, 500 feet.  This property is equipped with a _5 h. p. hoist, 10×17 Ingersoll Rand compressor , driven by a 100 h. p. motor.  The cost of this work including machinery, $54, 720.  This company is  financed by Washington people, principally from Tacoma, Washington.

W. B. Buckley, president of  the company, has been on the  property  since June 1, leaving Friday for Tacoma and  was well pleased with the outlook, his expert assuring him that he had every reason to believe he will bring in a good mine.

George W. Gallaher of Randsburg is the local manager of this property.’ –Bakersfield Californian

October 22, 1922:   “ACROSS THE WAY, the Silver Moon  is doing good work and in the other claim; Silver King of the Johannesburg company, Seattle, Wash.,  they are feverishly expecting to come in any day.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 7, 1922:  “   .” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 13, 1922: “  .” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 27, 1922:  “RICH STRIKE REPORTED IN SILVER KING MINE –After operating for two years, officials of the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company today reported a rich strike on the Silver King adjoining the California Rand Mine on the east.  Twelve hundred feet from the main shaft of  the famous mine eight inches of high-grade ore resembling that of the California Rand have been encountered, according to George W. Gallaher, one of the  original formers of the company.

Below the choice ore there is an approximately four feet of shipping ore and a large body of milling ore,  Gallaher further declares.  This will make possible the immediate shipping of  large quantities of ore, he avers.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 2, 1923:  “JOHANNESBURG MINE SHIPS SILVER ORE—Randsburg, May 2, –Another shipment of silver ore, averaging higher than 100 ounces of the white metal, with some gold values has been sent to the smelter by  the Johannesburg Mining and Milling company from their shaft.  The shipment consisted of 47  tons of ore and reports are to the effect that much more ore of the same quality is now in  sight and frequent shipments will be started within a  short time.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 4, 1923:  “ORE IS SHIPPED—A shipment of silver averaging 100 ounces, containing some gold values, has been forwarded to the smelter by Johannesburg Mining and Milling company from its Silver King.  The consignment consisted of forty-seven tons of ore.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

May 22, 1923:  “MANY PEOPLE ARE UNDER THE IMPRESSION that the local Silver King is the same that is listed on Bush Street, but it is not.  It is the holding of the Johannesburg Mining and Milling company, a Tacoma, Washington, enterprise.  It has shipped a car of very rich high grade and will sent out its second car this week.  The company is extracting the shipping ore from the 603 leel and the 650.  On the 700 level is has drifted N and 32 ½ east some 80 feet, 60 of which shows three feet of good milling ore that will run along better than $20 a ton.” –Bakersfield Californian

November 17, 1923:  “OFFER MADE FOR TWO SILVER KING CLAIMS –Telegraphic advice from Johannesburg, Calif., received this afternoon are to the effect that the stockholders of the Silver King Mining company have received an offer from the Silver Glance interests to buy mines one and two of the Silver King group for a reported consideration of $150,000.  The full purchase price is to be paid over within 18 months from the date of contract, according to the letters that have been mailed to stockholders.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 31, 1924:  “GUGGENHEIMS TO BUY SILVER KING—Big Mining Interests Close $750, 000 Deal for Randsburg Property. –Sale of the Silver King group of mining claims at Randsburg to the Guggenheim interests at a valuation of $750,000, it is said has reached the point of final negotiation, after being under consideration for several months.  The property adjoins the famous “Big Silver” mine owned by the Californian Rand, Inc., composed largely of Bakersfield stockholders.  The Silver King group belongs to the  Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, a Tacoma, Wash., corporation.  George Gallaher of Bakersfield was one of the original organizers and several large blocks of the Johannesburg stock is held locally.  The Silver Glance Company has a lease on a fractional claim on the property on this organization headed by E. J. Emmons with  many local stockholders.  The leasing company is down about 1,000 feet and it is said rich values rivaling the California Rand mine have been encountered.

MONEY IN ESCROW – The sale of the Silver King group is regarded as one of the most important deals ever made in the district.  It is said  that money has been placed in escrow in a Los Angeles bank to finance the deal.  Also work from Randsburg is to the effect that officials of the mining  company and the Guggenheim interests have gone to Tacoma to complete the transfer.  W. B. Buckley president of the mining company together with  ____________ who is general manager of the Guggenheim properties in the southwest, have negotiated the  deal.

The Guggenheims plan to engage in large development operations on the Silver King according to reports, opening from the prospect shaft which was about 700 feet in depth when the Tacoma company became involved in delays through the tragic killing of  one of its members on a trip to the desert.

SHAFT 2000 FEET—Development work will include the sinking of a shaft 2000 feet to obtain the bonanza  values if this be necessary.

Bakersfield  stockholders in the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company control about 240,000 shares of the stock, it is said.  W. A. Hunt, Ward Wright, J. W. McGrath, Roy Clemmons, and L. B Leiberdorfor are among the heavy stockholders locally, taking much interest in the reported sale. ” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 13, 1924:  “TWO BIG MINING DEALS REPORTED –Sale of the Silver King group of claims adjoining the California Rand Silver,  Incorporated for a consideration of $750,000, it is said, is embraced in the terms of and agreement entered into recently by W. H. Buckley, president of the company.  Following expiration of an option to the Guggenhime interests, engineers for eastern capitalists, who hod an option on the property, immediately began a survey of the underground values of the mine about 10 days ago.

Eastern interests are also negotiating for the Wild Rose mines in Panamint district, it is said, at a valuation of $500,000.

Reports from the Panamint district are to the effect that a revival of mining activity in this area is forecast by arrival of heavy operators with ample capital for exploitation.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

December 17, 1924:  “BIG SILVER SALE STARTS ACTIVITIES –Many Companies Hope to Swing In on Wave of Prosperity –Randsburg, Dec. 17.—Following the statement made last January that the Guggenheimers had been given a 60 day option on the Silver King group of four claims, adjoining the Big Silver mine and mill, many representatives of Eastern mining capitalists have visited the field.  Well known engineers have dropped in casually, “Just to see  the camp and district,”  while others have in a way tried to secure long time options on some of the ground that has been opened up or the idle claims close in, without putting up or paying out any good money.  In other words they have been trying to kill time until the various reports of the purchase of Californian Rand Silver’s holdings would get under way…” –Bakersfield Californian

December 24, 1924:  “NEGOTIATIONS FOR THE SALE of the Silver King property and other groups of claims adjacent to the “Big Silver” mine of the Californian Rand are reported to be included in a  big merger program.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 11, 1925:  “ACTIVE WORK, it is said, has started on a number of other properties in the silver zone.  Reports  are to the effect that the  Silver King, North Rand, Silver Belle, and a number of other properties are under option at attractive figures for the owners of stock.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 12, 1925:  “BAKERSFIELD MEN READY TO BID MILLION FOR MINE IN RANDSBURG DISTRICT –Hollywood Group First to Close 60-day Option.  –$750,000 is Offered – Local Company Will Develop Valuable Ore Strike.—Eager to bid one million dollars for the Silver King group of mining claims in Randsburg district,  directors of the Silver Glance Company organized by local people, met in Bakersfield yesterday resolved to take immediate action if an option held by other interest expired.  In a telegram from President Buckley of the holding company came the disappointing information that the mine had been sold.

“The deal was completed this morning at Hollywood” was the terse telegram from President Buckley, read at the meeting of the Silver Glance directors, ready to step into the place of former option holders.

It is understood that the sale was negotiated at a price of $750,000.  The option had been in force during the past 60 days, as exclusively published in The Echo.

SILVER GLANCE IN PAY—Although disappointment reigned in the directors meeting of the local company in losing out in plans to buy the Silver King group, it is thought that a  10 acre lease on the property held by the Silver Glance Company will prove to be a source of great riches.

We were disappointed in not being able to obtain the Silver King group stated Mr. Emmons, “but the other fellow beat us to it.”

WILL START SHIPPING—Immediate shipping of ore from the Silver Glance, and an intensive campaign to put the mine in the big producing class, will be a result of the decision reached yesterday.  High grade shipping ore, running values from $200 to $300 a ton, has been encountered in quantity according to reports.

The directors decided yesterday, to employ and expert engineer to make a survey of the development, which has reached a depth of ___feet.  On the 800-foot level ore has been encountered in both and east and west drifts.  In the 20-foot drift, in the west some water was encountered and the work was pushed to the east in a 280-foot drift.

ENCOUNTER RUBY.—Ore showing ruby is to be seen in both tunnels.  The mineralized zone is five feet in width with three fort of high grade in the pay shute.  Gold values assaying $54 to the ton were encountered on the 700 foot level.  Owing to the depth and extent of the values uncovered the owners of the property feel jubilant.

The property adjoins the California Rand Silver, Inc. which has produced more than $10,000,000 in values since 1919.  Last month the gross production in this mine was more than $300,000.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

February 12, 1925:  “SILVER KING MINE IS REPORTED SOLD–$1,000,000 Offer by Local People Declared to Have Been Turned Down. — Meeting to offer as high as $1,000,000 for the Silver King mining properties near Randsburg, directors of the Silver Glance mining company, were disappointed yesterday to learn that the property had already been sold, the transfer taking place at Hollywood, according to a telegram from President W. B. Buckley, of the Silver King Company, read at the local meeting.  E. J. Emmons, secretary of the Silver Glance Company, estimates that the sale price for the Silver King property would be in the neighborhood of $750,000.  The purchasers of the property are now known as yet.

Mr. Emmons expressed the disappointment of his directorate in being unable to bid in on the Silver King properties, “While we wanted to bid for this group,” explained Mr. Emmons, “It was merely to add to our 10 acre lease which comprises the Silver Glance claim which we believe to be very rich and which is not for sale.”

Mr. Emmons stated that plans in the further development of the Silver Glance property embrace immediate shipments of ore and a detailed survey of the mine’s possibilities by S. J. Pearce a mining engineer who has been appointed by the directors.  Mr. Pearce will also assay the mines ore in the new shute.  Ore running values from $200 to $500 a ton has been assayed from the Silver Glance according to Mr. Emmons.

At this time there is a 900 foot level in the mine with ore encountered in east and west drifts at the 800 foot level.  Some water has been encountered to the westward.  Gold values assaying $54 to the ton have been revealed on the 700 foot level.  The mineral zone is reported to be five feet wide with a three-foot high grade.” –Bakersfield Californian

June 14, 1925:  “RENEW OFFER FOR MINING INTERESTS – Silver Glance Company is Ready to Take Over Property of Silver King.—Negotiations are in progress for purchase of the Silver King group of claims, according to George W. Gallagher, who states that the Silver Glance Company has renewed its offer to pay a million dollars for the property.  The Tremaine interests, it is said, defaulted recently on an option to purchase the property.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 3, 1925:  “$750,000 PAID BY SILVER GLANCE MINING COMPANY—Deal Calls For $20,000 Payment; 80 Acres Sold. – Papers Clinching Transfer Already Signed by Directors.  – JOHANNESBURG CO. SELLING PROPERTY –Three Acres Deeded Rand Silver, According to Agreement. – Agreeing to pay $750,000, Silver Glance Mining Company, lessee, has completed negotiations for the outright purchase of 80 acres of Randsburg property, comprising its claims to Silver Glance Mine (formerly Silver King No. 1), and Silver King Mines N0s. 2,3, and 4,  it became known today.  Final papers binding the deal with Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, lessor, formerly owning the rich property which in the past has been worked under lease by Silver Glance interests, were signed on October 1, according to E. J. Emmons, one of the directors of Silver Glance Mine.

$20,000 CASH—Twenty thousand dollars cash is to be paid Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company within 60 days according to the agreement, the Silver Glance operators to assume immediate possession of the mines.  The balance of the $750,000 is to be paid in the future from the production of the claims, according to Mr. Emmons.

In acquiring the claims, officials of the Silver Glance mines entered into a second agreement in which three and one-third acres adjoining the claim of Uranium N0. 11 are deeded to California Rand Silver, Inc., to settle apex rights with the operators of the Big Silver claim.  It is said by Mr. Emmons that the apex of Uranium No. 11 pitched into the claims of Silver King Mines No. 2 and 4 and that in consideration of the small piece of land the boundary line established by the Californian Rand interests has been made vertical instead of slanting into the Silver King claims as in the past.

“In granting the three and one-third acres to Big Silver, we of the Silver Glance have made the title to our newly-acquired property absolutely safe.,” declared Mr. Emmons.  “The title is absolutely clear and we see not prospect of future litigations.”

Mr. Emmons believes that the move on the part of Silver Glance directors in addition to discoveries made to the shaft of Big Four Mine will, without doubt, make Randsburg a large and permanent camp.  “Silver Glance is down to the 900-foot level now.” He says “and within 30 days we will have a big crew of men on the location to sink the shaft still lower in preparation for sending out new drifts and stoping up to a ledge of high-grade ore that was struck a short time ago between the 700 and 900-foot levels.”

Prominent mining engineers who have looked over the Silver Glance claim declare that is shows all the appearances of developing into a big mine and that patches of ore already discovered are indicative of larger bodies in the vicinity of the shaft and the 300 or so feet of drifting already made.

SELL SHARES—discussing plans of the officials of the mine, Mr. Emmons stated that a limited number of shares in the claim will be sold in the near future.  “But,” he explained, “we are not going to issue more than will be absolutely necessary to continue the work of the mine.  Already 320,000 shares have been issued and we are going to keep the organization as concentrated as possible.  At the present time ours is one of the richest companies in the district and this is the first time from the inception of the Silver Glance work we have offered interest in the mine to the public as an investment.”

W. L. Buckley and J. C. Bonham of Tacoma, Washington, are signatories to the agreement for Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company in the capacity of president and secretary of the organization.  Both are prominent business men in the north and Mr. Bonham is the manager of the fifth largest flour milling company in the world.

Directors of Silver Glance mine are M. A. Dulgar, Bakersfield, president; H. T. Kemp, Pasadena; L. B. Yaeger, Los Angeles; G. B. Moore, Pasadena and E. J. Emmons of Bakersfield.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 4, 1924:  “SILVER KING IS SOLD TO SILVER GLANCE COMPANY.—Sale of the Silver King group adjoining claims in Rand District to the Silver Glance Company, which has been under negotiation for the past three months is nearing completion according to E. J. Emmons.  Under the terms of the sales agreement a cash consideration or $20,000 is to be paid and the balance of $750,000 is to be paid from the production of the mine.

In recent agreements the Johannesburg company deeded the California Rand Silver, Inc., a strip of land claimed under apex rights, and this left the property free of encumbrances.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 7, 1925:  “FIRST PAYMENT ON SILVER KING GROUP IS MADE.  The Silver King group of mining claims adjoining the Big Silver mine in Rand mining district has been taken over by the Silver Glance Company, first payment on the property being made on the first of this month.  Under the direction of George C. Taylor, mining engineer, the Silver Glance Company has placed a crew of hard rock miners at work.  The hoist and other equipment of the Silver King property being used by the new owners.

Under the terms of the sale a payment of $20,000 is to be made by January 1.  This amount will be paid in three installments falling due on November, December, and January 1.

In a statement yesterday attorney E. J. Emmons said that the situation is now clear for active development work upon the mining property, which was purchased at a valuation of $750,000.

Payments are to be made from the production obtained in future operations.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

January 6, 1926:  “FINAL CASH PAYMENT MADE ON KERN MINE—Final cash payments in the purchase of the Silver King mining claims of Randsburg by Silver Glance Company for $750,000 have been made and deeds transferring title to the properties placed in escrow with First National Bank, of Bakersfield.

E. J. Emmons, director of the Silver Glance Company, announced to The Californian today that the cash payments for the properties consisted of $20,000 and that the remaining $730,000 is to be paid by 15 per cent of the net smelter returns.

Purchase of the Silver King group, of which Silver King No. 2 is now known as Silver Glance, was made from Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, of which W. B. Buckley is president.  M. A. Dulgar of Bakersfield is president of the Silver Glance organization.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “THE SILVER KING AND SILVER MOON properties are owned by the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company.  The Silver King property is developed by a 1 ½ compartment vertical shaft, slightly over 700 feet deep.  The upper 469 feet passed through Rosamond strata.  Below 469 feet the shaft is in schist.l  A number of small dikes or rhyolite are reported as having been cut in passing through the lower 200 feet of the Rosamond series.” The schist encountered in the shaft is for the most part bacly broken and altered, being cut by calcite stringers containing scattered cystals of pyrite and stibnite. The first vein, 3 feet thich, was encountered at a depth of 603 feet and dipped to the east at an angle of 18 degrees.  Over a width o 1 foot this vein gave assays of from 600 to 900 ounces of silver.  Two shipments of ore were made from this vein, one of 38 ½ tons, the other of 44 tons.  The shipments returned $5.80 in gold and 93 ounces of Silver, and $8.80 in gold and 98 ounces of silver, respectively. A drift was run 140 east of the shaft on the 600 foot level.  The next drifting was done on the 650-foot level, where 265 feet of openings were run.  This drifting was among a vein striking n. 38 degrees E.  Good ore was obtained near the shaft and also 90 feet south at the shaft where the northeast vein was cut by a north south vein.

Rand Silver King Mine. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Co. Survery. Collection of Betty Hadley Family

Six hundred feet of work has been done on the 700-foot level.  A vein striking north was encountered 40 feet from the shaft.  This vein which is 7 feet wide dips from 62 degrees to 65 degrees east, and gives assays from 9 to 20 ounces of silver per ton across 5 feet. Two veins split off from this north-south vein, one 40 feet from the shaft, the other 115 feet north.  The firs of these veins locally assyays 26.2 ocunces of silver across 3 feet. The Silver moon property lies to the south of the Mizpah Montana Shaft.  It is developed by a vertical shaft 550 feet deep.  Levels are cut at 200, 300, and 550 feet.  Over 100 feet of work was done on the 200-foot level, several narrow veins being prospected.  There are 323 feet of working on the 300-foot level.  One vein, 22 feet thich, was cut 103 feet east of the shaft.  Thie vein here carried only traces of silver. Approximately 850 feet of work was done on the 550-foot level.  The vein encountered on the 300-foot level was fount 269 feet east of the shaft and thoroughly prospected.  It here carried up to 4.4 ounces of silver and $4.00 in gold per ton.–Hulin

May 15, 1928:  “NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS MEETING –Silver Glance Inc.————Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Glance, Inc., a corporation, will be held at the W. O. W. Hall located at the corner of Eighteenth and I Streets, in the city of Bakersfield, County of Kern, State of California, on Thursday, the first day of May, 1928, at 2 o’clock in the afternoon of said day,  for the purpose of consenting in the consolidation of this corporation with the Johannesburg Mining and Milling Company, a corporation, and with the Big Four Mining Company, a corporation, and for the purpose of consenting to the sale, assignment, transfer and conveyance of the whole of  the property of this corporation and the transaction of such other business as may properly come before said  meeting.

By order of the  Board of Directors of Silver Glance, Inc., a corporation.

Dated May 15, 1928

(Corporate Seal)                             L. F. ELWOOD

Secretary of said Corporation

May 15 to 31, incl.

Bakersfield Californian

GOOD MORNING

March 1925: “AMONG THE RECENT WORKINGS (chiefly silver prospects) which the writer was unable to visit may be mentioned the Good Morning , lying 3500 feet eas of the Silver Basin.” --Hulin

GRADY EXTENSION

March 1925: “AMONG THE RECENT WORKINGS (chiefly silver prospects) which the writer was unable to visit may be mentioned the Grady Extension east of the Navajo Shaft.” --Hulin

LITTLE JACK

March 1925: “AMONG THE RECENT WORKINGS (chiefly silver prospects) which the writer was unable to visit may be mentioned the Little Jack southeast of the Navajo shaft.” --Hulin

OSDICK MINE

CHRONOLGY

May 19, 1900: “R.W. CLOUD AND BARNEY OSDICK leave Tuesday evening for the Gunnison country in Colorado, to spend the summer and do a little prospecting.  They expect to return to Randsburg in the fall.” --Randsburg Miner

October 1, 1904: “BARNEY OSDICK, who is working in Merced Claim went out last night on a visit to his home in Kansas.  He expects to get to St. Louis and take in the Fair.” –Randsburg Miner

January 15, 1920: “LYCURGIS LINDSAY, who is co-operating with Mr. Barrington is testing out the Peter Osdick Claim, on which the original Osdick custom mill is located and on which Peter Osdick has lived since the death of his brother Barney.  A six inch cove (core) drill has been installed and test holes of 200 to 300 feet will be put down to definitely determine the depth and extent of the underlying ore body, which geologists declare exists on the flat east and both north and south of the Kelly working shaft.  The tests now being made will be continued until the exact value of the new silver field is fully determined, as Messrs. Barrington and Lindsay have ample capital to go the limit in development, and are in the field to stay. With core drilling in progress on the present extensive scale, the day of the grass-root miner, working on limited capital, will soon be a memory only. Pete Osdick left for Salt Lake Tuesday, January 12, presumably on business connected with the reported strike on his claim, as it is of record fact that at 50 to 60 feet evidence of silver has been found by the core drill, and that the trend of the stringers (three in number) is east of south.  Pete admits of the silver stringers, but refuses to gove out for publication the reason of his trip to Salt Lake.” --Barstow Printer

October 3, 1921: “PETE OSDICK is sinking on two shafts on claims near the Bisbee and Brey lease.” –Bakersfield Californian

March 1925: “AMONG THE MORE RECENT WORKINGS (chiefly silver prospects) which the writer was unable to visit may be mentioned the Osdick property east of Atolia reported to have produced tungsten worth $157,000.” --Hulin

JERSEY LILLY

March 1925: “AMONG THE MORE RECENT WORKINGS (chiefly silver prospects) which the writer was unable to visit may be mentioned the Jersey Lilly north of the Black Hawk mine.” --Hulin

BLANCK LEASE

CHRONOLOGY

October 23, 1919: “OF THE 16 OR MORE LEASES the signs of or indications of pre.warrant the continued development of every lease, and as depth is made, and crosscutting continues, the prospects improve. The Blanck lease north of the Kelly shaft, to date had made most progress, and Mr. Blanck appears to be satisfied with the progress made and the values of his lease.  An indication of this fact is evidence in the added fact that he has leased and additional 100 feet due south of the 87 foot lease which he is working, next to the Kelly Mine.” --Barstow Printer

January 15, 1920: “WORD CAME IN MONDAY that the Blanck lease had struck ore after cross-cutting the antimony, which was struck in the shaft south of the Kelly mine.” Barstow Printer

ALMA AND RED MOUNTAIN LODES

CHRONOLOGY

February 25, 1922: “IN THE ALMA GROUP adjoining the North Rand the controlling interest is held by J. R. Dorsey, district attorney of Kern County.  The shaft is now down 15 feet, all in ore.” Bakersfield Californian Mineral Survey No. 5709, Independence Land District, Surveyed June 16, 1923, Alma and Red Mountain Lodes, owned by Homer Sewell, Improvements consisting of 3 shafts, valued at $1557. Located T.30S.,R.41E.,MDMin west half of sec. 5

NAVAHO EXTENSION

Mineral Survey No. 5733, Independence Land District, claim located April 20, 1923 known as Navaho Extension, owned by E. T. Grady, Improvements consisting of 1 shaft and an undivded ½ interest in a shaft and drift and crosscut, valued at $4014. Locate SE ¼ sec. 6, T30S., R40 E.  M.D.M.

SILVER DELL

Mineral Survey No. 5744, Independence Land District, claim amended September 10, 1923, known as Silver Dell, owned by Charles Norman and J. Robert Burns.  Improvments consisting 3 shafts, 1 shaft and drift, and 1 cut.  Valued at $1041.  Located sec. 6. T30S., R41 E.  M.D.M. and sec. 31 T29S, R41 E, M.D.M.

May 31, 1924:  “GUY DIXON, doing assessment work near the Contact Rand shaft, believed that with a little depth a vein cut into will make good ore.” –Bakersfield Californian

SILVER REEF

Mineral Survey No. 5592, Independence Land District, claim located June 25, 1919, known as Silver Reef No. 1 and Silver Reef No. 2., owned by Charles L. Dignowity and Charles B. Flynn, improvements consisting of 4 shafts and 2 drill holes, valued at  $7370. Located between Hwy.395 and Coyote.

August 14, 1921:  “ON THE SILVER REEF GROUP, the International Diamond drill people of San Francisco, have the contract from Flynn and Elkins, eastern mining capitalists, to sink a series of holes, prospecting  the flat below the “big silver”, the Grady and the Coyote.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

September 5, 1921:  “SILVER LEAF (SIC) GROUP.  The diamond drilling crew finished the first contract.  They have decided where to start the second hole on Silver Reef No. 2.  It is understood that the total contract figure with the drillers, is to be not less than 25,000 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 7, 1921: “SILVER REEF GROUP –The International Diamond Drill people, San Francisco, have finished their initial contract with Flynn and Elkins.  In drilling 500 feet they sent it down at an angle of 60 degrees to a depth of 460 maintaining a vertical dip for the depth contracted for.  Yesterday they decide(d) wher(e) the second hole would be started on the Silver Reef No. 2.  It is understood that the total contract figure with the San Francisco diamond drillers is to be not less than 25,000 feet.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

September 10, 1921: “AT SILVER REEF NO. 1, a shaft is being sunk near where the diamond drill has been operating.  The diamond drill has been moved over to Silver Reef No. 2 and is under full headway.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 15, 1922:  “WORD HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED from Los Angeles that it is the intention of Flynn and Elkins, New York and eastern mining men to sink a shaft on the Silver Reef group, situated just below the “Big Silver” to a depth of 1000 feet.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

January 1922:  “Flynn Group as follows:  Silver Reef No. 1 and Silver Reef No. 2.  With these increased holdings this company materially strengthens its position in this district, and next to the California Rand Silver, Inc. will become the most important factor in the development of the camp.” –MINING IN CALIFORNIA, Monthly Chapter of Report XVIII of the State of Californian

June 14, 1922: “SILVER REEF.  Comprising two full claims adjoining the Coyote on the southeast, have been prospected by cross cuts from the 500-foot level of the Coyote shaft.  Nothing of importance has yet been discovered but persistent effort on the part of the owners should eventually bring results.  The Silver Reef has and interesting personnel behind it, including David b. Elkins of West Virginia, Charles B. _ylan of Cobalt, Canada: Mexico and Washington D. C.: Ex Judge John B. Street of Salt Lake City and Los Angeles: Charles L. Dignowity; John W. Kelly and E. I. Blank, all of Los Angeles.”  -  The Rand District News

June 14, 1922: “SILVER REEF.  Comprising two full claims adjoining the Coyote on the southeast, have been prospected by cross cuts from the 500-foot level of the Coyote shaft.  Nothing of importance has yet been discovered but persistent effort on the part of the owners should eventually bring results.  The Silver Reef has and interesting personnel behind it, including David b. Elkins of West Virginia, Charles B. _ylan of Cobalt, Canada: Mexico and Washington D. C.: Ex Judge John B. Street of Salt Lake City and Los Angeles: Charles L. Dignowity; John W. Kelly and E. I. Blank, all of Los Angeles.”  -  The Rand District News

RED MOUNTAIN LODE Mineral Survey No. 5636, Independence Land District, claim located November 11, 1921, known as Red Mountain Lode, owned by Charles L. Dignowity and W. H. Howard, improvements consisting 1 diamond drill hole, valued at $1884. Located N.E. ¼ sec. 7 and S.E. ¼ sec 6, T30S., R40 E.  M.D.M.

NAVAHO LODE

Mineral Survey No. 5673, Independence Land District, claim located November 8. 1921, known as Navaho Lode, owned by E. T. Grady, improvements consisting 1 shaft, station, and drifts, Value $35,000. Located N.E. sec.7, T30S., R40 E.  M.D.M.

JACK DURNAL

July 25, 1919: “JACK DURNAL MAKES FIND OF SILVER NEAR RANDSBURG—Jack Durnal has returned from the Randsburg district, where he owns several mining claims, which he inspected, and is making assays on ore from one of the claims which shows signs of being rich in silver.  He reports that the Kelly mine at Randsburg is working a full force of men, and a steady output of silver and gold ore is being realized from the mine daily.” – Bakersfield Californian

BREY AND BISBEE

CHRONOLOGY

May 4, 1921: “BREY AND BISBEE, leasers on the Osdick, are down 56 feet.  The formation is changing, favorably.  The local power people set stakes Monday morning, and will have the cement ready to connect up just as soon as the machinery arrives.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 6, 1921:  “BRAY AND BISBEE (some B’s) operating the Pete Osdick claim, broke ground 17 days ago on their double compartment shaft and now are down 56 feet, started with a windlass and small sized bucket,  at present have a gas outfit, timbermen are now cutting timbers for the new gallows, the power field men have set the stakes for poles to the lease which will be up by Tuesday, ready for the wire the next day and,  connections can be made by Thursday, if the carload of machinery now leaded and waybilled arrives.  Do you wonder with such workers here and more of their kind coming, that the Rand district is in for the biggest and best producers in the state.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo.

May 8, 1921: “BACKED BY ALMOST UNLIMITED CAPITAL the leasers of the Osdick claim, located 1200 feet from the Big Silver, are running three shifts on a double compartment shaft.  The formation as they progress is very encouraging.  At present they are operating with a gasoline hoist, later on, when their new electrical outfit arrives and is installed a new record will be hung up for sinking in the Rand district.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 9, 1921:  “THE LEASERS ON THE OSDICK CLAIM have secured the heavy machinery from the Black Hawk Tungsten mill, which I now being trucked over.  A force of men is laying the foundation for the concrete workers and timbermen have the (57?)foot frame near completion.  The sinking of their shaft proceeds.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

May 15, 1921:  “BISBEE AND BREY ARE STILL SPEEDING on the Osdick lease, all of their machinery is well housed, power connected and the frame for their gallows all but completed.”

STRIKE WELL DEFINED LEDGE OF QUARTZ—At 65 feet n their standard shaft, they went through a well defined ledge of quartz carrying gold values from $8 to $10.  As it is the leasers intention to continue sinking.  This fine will not be prospected until the first level (100 feet) is made, at which station a drift will be run to try and tap it. –Bakersfield Morning Echo

May 30, 1921:  “OSDICK LEASE, BISBEE & BREY, leasers, have installed machinery that will enable them to do rapid sinking.  In  addition to the new buildings they have also erected a large shed for the timbermen to work under.  Starting at 92 feet, a full force will be put to work.”  –Bakersfield Californian

August 15, 1921:  “BISBEE AND BREY, leasers on the Osdick claim, are down, 400 feet and will cut a station at that level.  On the third level they are drifting west.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 22, 1921:  “BISBEE & BREY ARE NOW DOWN 416 feet on the Osdick lease.  They are in a soft formation identical with that on top of the finds made in the Grady and Coyote.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 29, 1921:  “ON THE OSDICK LEASE, owing to a breakdown of their compressor, Bisbee and Brey, the leasers, had to lay off the greater part of the force.  Mucking and a general cleaning up is now going on.  A carload of timber is being hauled to the workings.  The diamond drill has arrived and will be placed at the fourth station.” –Bakersfield Californian

September 7, 1921:  “WIRING THROUHOUT THE LOWER WORKINGS has been completed for both lighting and for power to the diamond drill which started Friday.  Peter Osdick is sinking two shafts on as many adjoining claims to the Osdick lease.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 3, 1921: “BISBEE AND BREY are meeting with results both in sinking on shaft number one and with their diamond drill.” Bakersfield Californian

October 8, 1921: “BISBEE AND BREY are now down 510 feet.  Plans are under way for the developing and further prospecting.  At the 450 they have cut a pocket and will run above it to the 400, using 450 for a loading station for skins, at a depth of 530 will cut out another loading station with an incline raise to the 500.  The diamond drill is operating from the 450.  A new compressor is in route, the present one being too light for the work called.” – Bakersfield Californian

October 9, 1921: “Bisbee and Brey, are now down 516 feet.  Plans are under way for developing and further prospecting .  At the 450 they have cut a pocket and will run above it to the 4oo, using for a loading station for skips, at a depth of 550 will cut out another loading station with an incline raise to the 500.  The diamond drill is operating from the 450.

A new compressor is enroute, the present one being too light for the work called.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 13, 1921:  “BISBEE AND BREY ARE MEN WITH RESULTS both in sinking on shaft number one and with their diamond drill.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 16, 1921:  “AT THIS TIME we would like to call the attention to the first real money brought into the Rand district by R. R. Brey, and oil man of the sunny south.  Mr. Brey with Mr. A. W. Bisbee took over a bonding lease from Pete Osdick, on what is known as the Osdick lease.  They have sunk a standard shaft 530 feet.  Now that they are in milling ore they felt safe to incorporate as the Randsburg Mines Inc., capitalization $60,000 fully paid up. Directors, F. R. Kellogg, president of the Richfield Oil company, Everett King, King Lumber company, C. M. Fuller and J. R. Jacobs, Richfield Oil company and R. R. Brey.

Shaft No. 1 lies 1665 feet southwest of the California Rand, and is down 530 feet, a pocket station has been cut in at the 450.  The incline from the 500 foot to the 450 has been started.  Diamond drilling has been completed after drilling a hole 600 feet flat, the second hole was at an angle of 35 to the east.  The results of the diamond drill was most satisfactory.  A double standard drum is now enroute for the main shaft, material and lumber for the concrete foundation for it and a new compressor is  now being trucked in.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 18, 1921:  “RANDSBURG, SEPT. 16 — IN A DRIFT at the bottom of the shaft, 450 feet, a strike has been made on the Brey and Bisbee lease, carrying good values, showing freely in ruby silver.  Further development will no doubt bring it in place; it is the same character of ore that has been brought in so extensively in the California Rand mine, the Grady and Sill lease and the Coyote claim.  Their shaft is 1665 feet south of the California Rand, 16 degrees, 10 minutes east.  The diamond drillers on this same property have advanced another 100 feet for the week.  Owing to the mass of cores sent into Los Angeles by the other drilling contracts, Brey and Bisbee have had no returns on their cores.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

October 19, 1923: “MINING MAN IS KILLED IN WELL—D. W. Bisbee Overcome in 400-Feet Shaft:  Son of Bisbee, Aria. Founder—Randsburg, Oct. 19 –D. W. Bisbee, superintendent of the Randsburg Mining Company and of the Randsburg Water Company, was killed in the 400-foot shaft of the water company well at Randsburg Monday afternoon when he was overcome by the temperature at the bottom of the well and fell from a platform, striking on his head.  He was dead when removed from the well.  His body was found in the water at the bottom of the shaft a few minutes after he had been lowered in the bucket to make an inspection.

Bisbee went to the water plant well shaft, the afternoon he was killed, with George E.  Bragg and Arthur McLaren.  He was lowered down the shaft in the bucket to a platform occupied by a pumping station about 15 feet from the bottom.  After he had been in the well for a few minutes he rang the bell nine times, after giving the signal to raise the bucket.  It is thought that he meant to sound the danger signal, seven rings.

Bragg and McLaren hoisted the bucket at once.  It was empty.  They immediately were lowered into the well and found Bisbee’s body at the bottom.  They placed him in the bucket and were raised, whereupon t was found that the superintendent was dead.

Bisbee was 40 years old.  He was the son of D. W. Bisbee, founder of Bisbee, Arizona.  He was born in San Francisco, where as a boy, he was graduated from Lick high school and later from the University of California, at Berkeley.

An autopsy showed the heard in good condition, and it is believed that Bisbee became overcome by heat when in the well.  It is thought that he felt his weakness approaching and attempted to be raised from the well before fainting.  Bruises at the base of the skull showed where he struck his head in falling from the platform into the water.

Robert G. Bragg, business associate of the late Bisbee and brother of George E. Bragg, came to Randsburg from Los Angeles upon hearing of the fatality, and accompanied the remains to the southern city, where the Bisbee home is now.

According to word received here from Los Angeles, Bisbee had prepared to attend a family reunion at his home in Los Angeles.  His widow is prostrated with grief over the tragedy.

“I can’t understand how this could occur.”  Said Mrs. Bisbee in speaking of the accident, “We were both about to experience the most glorious days of our lives, and plans had already been completed for a “second honeymoon.”  Our trip would have taken us to Europe.” –Bakersfield Californian

October 23, 1921: “DeWITT BISBEE. WHOSE FATHER GAVE HILL CITY ITS NAME, DIES IN CAL. DOUGLAS, Oct, 19. S. P. Applewhite received notice yesterday of the accidental death of DeWitt Bisbee at Randsburg. Cal. Mr. Bisbee fell in an old mine shaft and was killed. The city of Bisbee was named for his father. Mr. Bisbee Is a cousin of Mrs. J. S. Douglas, of this city.” – Tombstone Epitaph

June 11, 1922: “RANDSBURG, CALIF. JUNE 10—The most notable of recent developments in the Rand district is the discovery of a new vein in the Bisbee property opened on the 450-foot level of the Bisbee shaft and for a distance of approximately 80 feet sampling from $20 to $1260 per ton in silver, for an average width of three feet.  The vein apparently is a branch of the main vein system of the California Rand, developed in that mine and in the Coyote and Bisbee ground.  It has a southeasterly trend, the main Rand vein striking almost south. Its course is through the westerly part of the Atolia Fraction and Tip Top-Hardgraft claim and into the One Track claim of the Black Hawk group, owned by the Pittsburgh and Mt. Shasta Gold Mining and Milling Co.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

SILVER BAR

CHRONOLOGY

October 8, 1921: “SILVER BAR, having a deal on, are now taking a deserved rest.” – Bakersfield Californian

December 14, 1921: “JOHNSON, LUCAS TO ORGANIZE COMPANY –A project contemplating development of one of the choice-lying lodes in the Randsburg district is being launched by C. F. Johnson, manager of the Kern River Oil company  for 19 years and known to every oil man in Kern county, and C. E. Lucas, an Arizona mining man. They plan to organize a syndicate for $21,000 for the purchase and development of the Silver Bar lode, lying almost exactly between the great Californian Rand Silver mine and the Erecart, which is the point of original discovery of silver by Nosser and Williams, and which resulted in the finding later of the astonishingly rich blowout that has become famous as the greatest silver producer in the United States in recent years. Engineers advise Messrs. Johnson and Lucas that the veins trending through their property are the same that contact with the dike on the California Rand Silver holdings, and that the showing in the shaft, which is now 80 feet deep, justifies extensive development. It is not intended at this time to incorporate, but to first sink to 5 (5+1) 5 feet, and then perhaps submit a larger proposal to buyers of mining shares. Sinking will be done by contract as offering the fastest return for the money expended, and the promoters have already received numersous bids from responsible contractors. It is understood that the syndicate is about completed and that work will begin within the next few days—before Christmas if possible. Especial Bakersfield interest centers around the Silver Bar project because it lies adjacent to the Red Dyke, which will be developed by a group of the best known men in Kern County.  The Gallagher, another very promising property, and which is making a most satisfactory showing—in fact, is reported in the high-grade ore at 200 feet—lies just next south.  This strike in the Gallagher makeS ore in the Silver Bar almost a foregone fact.” – Bakersfield Californian

February 25, 1922: “THE STAMPEDE GROUP, north of the North Rand, has been incorporated under the name of the SILVER BAR.  Floyd H. Barnett of Bakersfield is trustee. It is planned to start work at once.  Mr. Barnett also controls 160 acres of patented land in the stringer district which has given assays of high value in gold and silver.” – Bakersfield Californian

SILVER WARE MINING CO.

January 14, 1922: “KENT S. KNOWLTON AND JAMES STOCKTON of the Silver Ware Mining company at Randsburg are in Bakersfield today.” – Bakersfield Californian

RANDSBURG MONARCH MINES CO.

February 25, 1922: “THE RANDSBURG MONARCH MINES COMPANY is contemplating a deep working shaft on its claim, upon which work will begin at once, it was said.  This concern has home offices in Los Angeles.  Officers of the company are A. J. Kisselburgh, New York, president;  E. W. Carroll, Jerome Ariz.; W. S. Holmquist, Ely Nev.; W. S. Montgomery, Cripple Creek, Colo., and A. L. Jameson, Los Angeles.”—Bakersfield California

RAND CENTRAL

February 25, 1922: “ADJOINING THE MYRA QUEEN on the south is the Rand Central. This property is being promoted by William C. Borchers of Bakersfield and upon it work will be started immediately.” –Bakersfield Californian

BEN HUR

CHRONOLOGY

April 4, 1922: “BEN HUR COMPANY BUYS DRY WASH CLAIM—Randsburg, April 4.—The Dry Wash Claim has been purchased by the Ben Hur Mining Company of Tonopah, Nev., through their agent Mr. Hall, the deal being concluded Saturday.

It was purchased from Max Hess, Ed Herkelrath and Charles Hammer of Randsburg and Wilbur Price of Catalina, the consideration being $23,000.

This claim is above the Silver Moon shaft and in line with Errecart lease, upon which the strike was recently made which gives it added value.  The present owners intend to work it themselves, all the stock being held by the Ben Hur Company.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 7, 1922:  “NEVADA MINING COMPANY INVADES RANDSBURG—Convincing evidence that the fame of Randsburg as the greatest operating silver camp in the world, is spreading rapidly into other states, is established by the fact that the Ben Hur Mining Company, a Nevada corporation, has come into the field, from the famous old Tonopah country, prepared for immediate development of the Dry Wash, a claim recently secured from Tom Royal and associates.

The Dry Wash adjoins Uranium 1 and Uranium 3 on the south and east and 1230 feet easterly from K. C. N. No. 1, the original silver discovery in this camp made by Jack Nosser in 1918.  The southeast corner of Dry Wash is about 1200 feet from the great glory hole on the California Rand Silver, out of which, during the past two years and one half, has been shipped several million in high-grade silver ore.

The men directing affairs of Ben Hur have all established reputations as successful Nevada operators, and will devote personal attention to the intelligent exploration of the splendid vein system cropping on Dry Wash.  Complete machinery equipment, according to A. B. Hall, consulting engineer and manager-director, is being loaded at Tonopah, and is expected on the ground, ready for installation about the last of the coming week.

Officers of the Ben Hur are George Brandon, president, Goldfield, who made a lot of money out of the Pioneer leases years ago, and is also interested in numerous other mining properties; Albert Kelly, vice-president, mining operator and capitalist of Tonopah; R. J. Kelly, secretary-treasurer, member of the firm of Campbell & Kelly, Tonopah, dealers in mining machinery.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 9, 1922:  “QUERIES ARE BEGINNING TO COME IN FROM San Francisco mining men in reference to reports that they hear from a long distance range.  With the advent of the Ben Hur Co., taking over the Dry Wash claims there will be a tendency of Tonopah capital to flow in here, which in itself means San Francisco and Eastern capital will come with a rush as this class of mining men is looking for properties to open up and operate. It will mean that all of the gold producers will be equipped with standard machinery and in the hands of practical superintendents who know mining from every angle, getting results that will increase the reputation of Randsburg and the Rand Mining district.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

April 14, 1922:  “WITH THE COMING of the Ben Hur people we expect to see notables of the old silver state.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 21, 1922:  “A CARLOAD OF THE VERY BEST AND LATEST mining machinery and a carload of mine timber, building lumber, material and supplies arrived Wednesday night via the Santa Fe from Tonopah for the Ben Hur Co.  Billy Atkinson with a string of 5 and 6-ton trucks is now delivering the same to the Dry Wash Claim.  The foundations for the machinery, shops and comfortable houses are in order.  They are down 18 feet in what will be the main shaft.  In breaking ground for the hoist and compressor the miners cut a stringer rich in gold, but General Manager Hall is not being coaxed away from the company’s intention of going down until they do bring in high grade silver.” –Bakersfield Californian

May 27, 1922:  “A. B. HALL, the general manager of the Ben Hur, has returned from a week’s visit to Tonopah.  Mr. Hall states that Nevada s taking notice of Randsburg and the Rand mining district, he further states that number of well-known operators from the Silver State will visit Randsburg in June.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

June 20, 1922:  “SERETARY R. J. KELLY OF THE BEN HUR MINE, accompanied by Albert Kelly, Roger Daughtery and C. W. Brandon, officials and heavy stockholders, came in last evening from Tonopah, making the trip in 18 hours.  After a visit to the Ben Hur, they expressed themselves well pleased with the through workmanship of installing machinery, building, etc., and a shaft down 100 feet in five weeks, besides the showings and formation warrants them to believe that within the next 150 feet they will be showing values if not shipping ore.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

July 23, 1922:  “A WIRE FROM SAN FRANCISCO, informs us that over 40,000 shares of Ben Hur around 8 and 9 cents and 50,000 shares of Belcher Ex. At 3 and 4 cents were traded in Friday.  Big interest going in both of these the only two Rand companies listed in the San Francisco board.  It is to be remembered that both of these stock came up from a one-cent quotation mark.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 3, 1922: “BEN HUR HAS BEEN ON THE DECLINE the past week, touching the nickel figure. With the showings and the good formation encountered in the shaft, as it was sunk to the 200 much can be expected as soon as the miners cut through the present vein matter.  It is only a question in the next 100 feet about their hitting it. ” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

August 8, 1922:  “CHAS. BRADON AND J. R. KELLEY, prominent Nevada mining men interested in the Ben Hur, arrived Friday afternoon.  A visit to the underworkings of the Ben Hur was made late in the evening, just before the miners were ready to shoot.  The showings made both in the deep shaft and the drifts were a revelation to the visitors and it gave them a clear and positive assurance that the ore is near.  W. H. Hart, a well-known mining man from Colorado to Nevada, and the man that took more good ore out of the  Florence for the space of time than any other mine, was one of the  best pleased in knocking down the good looking rock.  Another of Tonopah’s successful leasers in its balmy days. Tom Lynch expressed himself satisfied that the Ben Hur would soon be in the shipping class.  The visitors left for Tonopah with a story of 11 feet of $1500 ore in the famous Kelly mine of Randsburg.” – Bakersfield Morning Echo

September 10, 1922:  “A PARTY OF HEAVY STOCKHOLDERS interested in the Ben Hur are here from San Francisco watching the developments now on the 300 of the Ben Hur.  They want to be on the ground in case General Manager Hall shoots into the ruby silver which is now believed to be very near.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 11, 1922:  “WE ARE DELUGED WITH QUERIES as to why Ben Hur fell from 24 to 20.  As in all live listed securities the profit taker must have his, they there is the broker that is short, it is up to him to bear, no matter how.  In this case they could only throw out than as the Ben Hur intended putting in a new and complete machinery plant there would not be anything doing for a month; in other works the “mine would be shut down for a month.”  Don’t ever believe it; just as soon as the machinery is put on the cars at Tonopah then the present plant will be installed on the Ben Hur Ex and without any loss of time to mention, both shafts will be resumed.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 11, 1922:  “BRIGHT AND EARLY MONDAY MORNING two of the big Campbell and Kelly trucks left Tonopah, Nev., loaded down with 8 ½ tons of the latest and modern electrical mining machinery destined for the Ben Hur mine, Randsburg.  Wires Saturday as to whether it would be better to ship by truck or train were exchanged between the machinery men an  General Manager Hall, the local engineer in charge.  From past experiences it was shown that less handling and better time could be made in shipping by truck notwithstanding that the White Mountains may be heavily covered with snow.

It might be well at this time for the many companies now operating to make note of this item and the time it will take to install, and the hour that the plant will be running as smoothly as the power that will supply it.  All of which means that both the Ben Hur and the Ben Hur Ex., will make history for the Rand District of California.” –Bakersfield Morning Echo

November 16, 1922:  “FOX WILL MANAGE BEN HUR COMPANY—Randsburg, Nov. 16.—J. M. Fox, formerly mining engineer of the Tonopah Mining Company and at present consulting engineer for the Tonopah Belmont, and other prominent companies, has succeeded A. B. Hall as managing engineer of the Ben Hur Mining Company, effective immediately, according to a telegram from secretary J. R. Kelly.” –Bakersfield Californian

December 1922:  “AT THE BEN HUR in the same district new hoisting equipment has been installed and is in operation.” –Pacific Mining News of the Engineering and Mining Journal Press

January 5, 1923: “THE BEN HUR is cutting a station at 400.” –Bakersfield Californian

Ben Hur Divide Mining Company Stock Certificate. Collection of the Rand Desert Museum

January 23, 1923:  “ITS NEIGHBOR, THE BEN HUR at 70 foot feet from the shaft on the 400 passed through a six-foot vein of hard bluish quartz; the cross cutting to be continued until  the main vein is reached, a possibility of another 75 feet.” –Bakersfield Californian

January 25, 1923: “A WIRE FROM SAN FRANCISCO states that Ben Hur sales are being made at 12 cents.  As a lot of this stock is held in Kern County, the new will travel fast.” – Bakersfield Californian

THE BEN HUR COMPANY of the Divide District of Nevada has acquired what was known as the Dry Wash Claim.  This was formerly owned by Herkelrath, Hess, Price and Hammer, who had sunk a shaft 75 ft. deep and had done about 125 ft. of open cut work and trenching on the various veins on this claim.  This claim lies west of the so-called ‘dyke’ of the district.  Five to six veins appear to outcrop within its boundaries; the strongest of these is the Ben Hur vein, which averages, where trenched across, 8 ft.  The formation is schist, highly silicified.

Under the direction of Mr. A. B. Hall, a shaft 41/2’ x 8’ in the clear has been sunk to a depth of 125 ft. and he anticipates cutting the vein in this shaft at a depth of 200 ft.  Assays running 5 to 6 ounces of silver have been obtained from some of the open cuts and trenches.  From his personal inspection which the writer made of this property he was strongly impressed by the very competent manner in which this claim was being explored.” –California Journal of Mines and Geology Volume 18

February 3, 1923:  “WITH THE NUMBER OF HEAD FRAMES set up, under way or in transit, there are several hoists being installed, The Rand White Horse have theirs on the concrete, the Ben Hur Extension landed all of the gas plant from the Ben Hur proper, the Silver Kings big hoist arrived from Goldfield and is now being trucked over from the freight yard to the shaft.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 13, 1923:  “A VISIT TO SEVERAL OF THE SHAFTS that are striving to get under way found the Ben Hur Extension hoist installed and sinking from the 70-foot resumed.” –Bakersfield Californian

February 27, 1923: Randsburg Feb. 27.—A SHORT HIKE through the active field shows the Ben Hur Ex. Going good, now down 90 feet. Machinery running nicely, a building covering same nearing completion.” – Bakersfield Californian

Ben Hur Mine. 1922 Southern Sierra Power Co. Survey. Collection of Betty Hadley Family

March 8, 1923:  “ON THE BEN HUR they are cross-cutting on the fourth level and drifting on the third.” –Bakersfield Californian

April 10, 1923:  “THE BEN HUR EX., in the cross cut on the first level went through 10 feet of mineralization that has the appearance of rock that would carry gold values; as they are after  one of the Gold Coin rich ledges cross cutting will continue.” –Bakersfield Californian

August 30, 1923: “COMPANY DISPOSES OF RANDSBURG PROPERTY—Randsburg, Aug. 30. –For and in consideration  of a cash payment in the four figures, the Ben Hur Divide Mining Company has disposed of all of the machinery, buildings, ventilating and air pipe, trackage and in fact, everything movable on top, to the Silver Basin Mining Company of Randsburg.  The latter company has a promising gold prospect and are now about ready to decide at which site they will sink their main and permanent shaft.  In the meantime, they will start the preliminary work of laying the foundation for complete electrical equipment, water, power and telephone lines.  The Silver Basin ground adjoins the Black Hawk holdings, in the proven gold district.”—Bakersfield Californian

March 1925:  “THE BEN HUR PROPERTY, comprising a single patented claim, was operated by the Ben Hur Divide Mining Company.  The property is developed by a vertical 1 ½ compartment shaft, 400 feet deep.  Levels occur at 200 feet, with 350 feet of workings; 300 feet, with 375 feet of workings; and 400 feet, with 910 feet of workings.

Three veins which occur on the property were thoroughly prospected by these workings.  The veins possessed strikes from north to southeast and fairly steep dips to the east and southeast.  They carried small quantities of silver minerals.

Although severely criticized by local press for their action, the operators of the Ben Hur in 1923, after having thoroughly prospected these veins and finding the valueless, properly proceeded to shut down the property and dismantle its equipment.

BEN HUR EXTENSION—This property, which lies a short distance southeast of the Baltic mill, was prospected by a vertical shaft 100 feet deep , and a  drift 240 feet in length extending northwest from the bottom of the shaft.  Several stringers were cut which showed the presence of traces of gold.

The property was taken over in the fall of 1923 by the Monarch Rand Company.” –Hulin

BEVIS

February 27, 1923: SINKING ON THE BEVIS LEASE has been resumed, at 70 feet there is a favorable change showing.” – Bakersfield Californian

BIG FOUR

March 24, 1923: “SINK DOUBLE SHAFT—Up on the side of Red Mountain, on the Big 4 workings they are making good time in sinking on their double compartment shaft, now down 364 feet and still keeping the pace of three sets of timbers every two days.  For a spell due to poor caps or an inferior bunch of powders they were bothered with misfired holes likewise the lumber consignments were delayed in transportation, all of which will soon be remedied by the powder and railway people.  Their extra or emergency hoist has been installed and soon as can be connected up will be in commission.  The Big 4 shaft is a standard double compartment, 4 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches each compartment, the manway is 2 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches, the timbering of which requires a steady supply of the best mining timbers in the market.” – Bakersfield Californian

CLIMAX MINING, MILLING AND TUNNEL

April 2, 1923: “LOS ANGELES CAPITAL IS NEVER SLOW when shown an opportunity to take a chance.  The latest and only corporation of its intended developments, is the Climax Mining, Milling and Tunnel company located about one and one quarter miles from the California Rand No. 6 shaft.  Their representative F. A. Vickery, has just closed a contract for running the first 50 feet of a tunnel which will be driven in on their Red Mountain holdings.” – Bakersfield Californian

RANDSBURG EXPLORATION

May 5, 1923: “NOTICE OF DATE OF HEARING of Application for Voluntary Dissolution—In the Superior Court of the State of California, in and for the County of Kern. In the matter of the application of Randsburg Exploration Company, a corporation to discorporate…..”Bakersfield Californian

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